Lessons learned technical series



Yüklə 0.59 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/7
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü0.59 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

Collection

Collection No. Collector

Date 

collected

Locality

Sex

Comments 

n/a


n/a

C. Pearce

17 June 1875 Ovalau

Male


TYPE, description only  (Ramsay 1875)                            

n/a


n/a

C. Pearce

17 June 1875 Ovalau

Female


TYPE, description only  (Ramsay 1875)

n/a


n/a

C. Pearce

15 June 1875 Ovalau

Unknown


TYPE for aureicinctus, description only  (Layard 1875)

Macleay 


B.1797

C. Pearce

Unknown

Ovalau


Male

Paralectotype (Fisher & Longmore 1995)   

Macleay 

B.1798


C. Pearce

Unknown


Ovalau

Male


Lectotype (Fisher & Longmore 1995)

Macleay 


B.1799

C. Pearce

Unknown

Ovalau


Female

Paralectotype (Fisher & Longmore 1995)

Macleay 

B.1799a


C. Pearce

Unknown


Ovalau

Female


Paralectotype (Fisher & Longmore 1995)

Liverpool 

T.2774

C. Pearce



15 June 1875 Ovalau

Unknown


TYPE, Syntype aureicinctus (Fisher & Longmore 1995) 

Liverpool 

T.2773

E.L. Layard



August 1875 Taveuni

Unknown


BM-Tring

89.1.20.106

E.L. Layard

1 Aug 1875

N'Gila, Taveuni

Male


Food: flowers. Beak: orange, legs: orange, iris: buff

BM-Tring


89.1.20.107

E.L. Layard

2 Aug 1875

N'Gila, Taveuni

Female

Food: flowers. Beak: orange, legs: orange, iris: buff



BM-Tring

89.1.20.108

E.L. Layard

22 July 1875 N'Gila, Taveuni

Female

Food: flowers. Beak: coral, legs: coral, iris: pale scarlet



BM-Tring

89.1.20.146

E.L. Layard

22 July 1875 Taveuni

Male

Food: flowers. Beak: coral, legs: coral, iris: pale scarlet



BM-Tring

89.1.20.178

E.L. Layard

2 Aug 1875

N'Gila, Taveuni

Male


Food: flowers. Beak: orange, legs: orange, iris: buff

BM-Tring


98.12.2.167

E.L. Layard

18 Aug 1875 N'Gila, Taveuni

Juvenile


Food: flowers. Beak: orange, legs: orange, iris: buff

BM-Tring


98.12.2.168

E.L. Layard

1 Aug 1875

N'Gila, Taveuni

Male

Food: flowers. Beak: orange, legs: orange, iris: buff



BM-Tring

98.12.2.169

E.L. Layard

2 Aug 1875

N'Gila, Taveuni

Female


Food: flowers. Beak: orange, legs: orange, iris: buff

BM-Tring


1912.6.14.8

A.R. Tarte 

24 Jan 1912

Taveuni


Female

(Juvenile)."Lived in confinement for 4 months"

Australian 

A2646


J.A. Boyde

Sept 18781

Fiji

Female


Australian 

30595


Grant

19021


Fiji

Unknown


Australian 

A836


W.J. Abbott2

Nov 18771

Levuka, Ovalau

Female


"kulawai" 

Australian 

Unknown

W.J. Abbott



Unknown

Levuka, Ovalau

Unknown

No details, on loan to J. Forshaw



Philadelphia 50571

E.L. Layard3

1877

Unknown


Male

Obtained from Australian Museum

Vienna

49.948


Th. Kleinschmidt

mid Dec 1875 Taveuni

Male

Obtained from Museum Godeffroy (No. 12809) in 1877



AMNH

618263


Th. Kleinschmidt4 Unknown

Viti Levu

Male

Native name: Thula Wai



AMNH

618264


Th. Kleinschmidt

Unknown


Viti Levu

Unknown


Native name: Thula Wai

AMNH


618265

Th. Kleinschmidt

Unknown

Viti Levu



Male

Native name: Thula Wai



Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

25

Collection



Collection No. Collector

Date 

collected

Locality

Sex

Comments 

AMNH


618266

Th. Kleinschmidt

Unknown

Viti Levu



Male

Native name: Thula Wai

AMNH

618267


Th. Kleinschmidt

Unknown


Viti Levu

Male


Native name: Thula Wai

AMNH


618268

Th. Kleinschmidt

Unknown

Viti Levu



Unknown

AMNH


618269

Th. Kleinschmidt

Unknown

Viti Levu



Unknown

AMNH


221440

R.H. Beck

5 May 1925

Viti Levu

Female

Iris/legs/bill: yellow. Sex organs: swelling



AMNH

249464


R.H. Beck

5 May 1925

Viti Levu

Female


Iris/legs/bill: yellow. Sex organs: swelling

AMNH


249465

R.H. Beck

5 May 1925

Viti Levu

Female

Iris/legs/bill: yellow. Sex organs: swelling



AMNH

249466


R.H. Beck

6 May 1925

Viti Levu

Female


Iris/legs/bill: yellow. Sex organs: swelling 

AMNH


249468

R.H. Beck

7 May 1925

Viti Levu

Female

Iris/legs/bill: yellow. Sex organs: small



AMNH

249469


R.H. Beck

8 May 1925

Viti Levu

Female


Iris/legs/bill: yellow. Sex organs: small

AMNH


249470

R.H. Beck

8 May 1925

Viti Levu

Female

Iris/legs/bill: yellow. Sex organs: small



AMNH

249471


R.H. Beck

13 May 1925 Viti Levu

Female

Iris/legs/bill: yellow. Sex organs: swelling



AMNH

249472


R.H. Beck

13 May 


19255

Viti Levu

Female

Iris/legs/bill: yellow



Ex-AMNH

249473


R.H. Beck

13 May 1925 Viti Levu

Male

Given to Dr. Streseman in Berlin, 1927



DMNH 

[AMNH]


39670 

[249463]6

R.H. Beck

1 May 1925

Viti Levu

Female


Iris: orange, bill & feet: yellow, sexual organs swelling

DMNH 


[AMNH]

39671 


[249467]6

R.H. Beck

6 May 1925

Viti Levu

Male

Iris, bill & feet: yellow, sexual organs small



Fiji, Suva 

Unknown


F. Clunie

17 Sep 1977 Nadarivatu, Viti 

Levu

Female


Caught in a mist net

Victoria


57589

Unknown


Unknown

Unknown


Unknown

Mounted. No details, on loan to J. Forshaw

Victoria

57590


Unknown

Unknown


Unknown

Unknown


Mounted. No details, on loan to J. Forshaw

Notes:

1

 Date registered with the museum.



2

 Also on museum’s records as donated by Abbott: one specimen exchanged to Walter Chamberlain (see note 

3

) and two missing from the collection. 



3 Specimen obtained from the Walter Chamberlain collection in exchange with the Australian Museum, and is 

probably the same specimen as detailed in note 2. 

4 Kleinschmidt collected for the Godeffroy Museum, Hamburg, between 1850 and 1880 (Watling 1982). Wood 

& Wetmore (1926) state ‘five skins in the Tring Museum were collected by T. Kleinschmidt in the interior of 

Viti Levu about 1872’ (but not currently at Tring).

5 Date not recorded but assumed same as specimen before and after.

6 Acquired from AMNH, [ ] = AMNH old collection number.


COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

26

Attachment 2



Red-throated Lorikeet Sightings since 1965 

COMPILED By DICK WATLInG



Observer

Date seen

Location

Altitude

Comments

Status

Reference

Island

Locality

(m)

1

Watling


1965 – 1973

Viti Levu

Nadarivatu/ 

Nadrau 


> 800

Two observations at Lomalagi and one near 

Navai. No more than three birds

2

.



Confirmed

DW obs.


Clunie

1972


Viti Levu

Joske's 


Thumb

433


In fresh peregrine prey remains, feathers & 

contents of pellets. Not confirmed by fossil 

bone material from the eyrie.

Confirmed

Clunie (1972). 

Worthy 


(1999).

Gorman


Nov 1970 – 

May 1973


Viti Levu

Nabukulevu

120-180

78 hours observation at 150m–610m. Seen 



infrequently, rare.

Confirmed

Gorman 

(1975a)


Gorman

Nov 1970 – 

May 1973

Viti Levu

Nadarivatu 

plateau: 

Navai to 

Nadrau


760-910

25 hours observation. Seen infrequently, rare.

Confirmed

Gorman 


(1975a)

Gorman


Nov 1970 – 

May 1973


Viti Levu

Mt. 


Tomaniivi

610-910


26 hours observation.

Confirmed

Gorman 

(1975a)


Blackburn

Aug / Sept 

1970

Viti Levu



Nausori 

Highlands



< 550

Two birds by P. Crombie. Not on Taveuni. 

Unconfirmed

3

Blackburn 



(1971)

Holyoak


28 June – 6 

July 1973

Viti Levu

Waisa, 


Vunidawa

200-250


Not uncommon on a forested ridge, seen 

twice and heard repeatedly 

Unconfirmed

3

Holyoak 



(1979)

Holyoak


28 June – 6 

July 1973

Viti Levu

Naitaradamu

800

Several seen.



Unconfirmed

3

Holyoak 



(1979)

Holyoak


12 – 21 July 

1973


Taveuni

Not stated

510-1000

Widespread in the rainforest, seen or heard 

on 5 days. Two feeding in canopy of a tall 

tree at 700m, with collared lory and wattled 

honeyeater (unconfirmed)

3

.



Unconfirmed

3

Holyoak 



(1979)

Watling


Aug 1975

Viti Levu

Nadrau 

plateau


> 700 

Small flock (4 or 5) seen feeding in a white 

flowered tree on path from Nadrau to 

Monasavu dam site along Nanuku Creek. 

Confirmed

DW obs. 


Beckon

1975 – 1978

Viti Levu

Monasavu


700-800

Photographs and video footage.

Confirmed

Clunie


6 – 21 Oct 

1979


Viti Levu

Nadrau 


plateau

730-820


Well known to everyone at Nadrau, saw 1 

group of 3 and lone individual feeding in 

vuga, alongside kula. Said to be seen when 

vuga flowers, in small groups with kula in 

same tree.

Confirmed

Clunie (1979) 

Watling


28 Sept 

1981


Viti Levu

Road to 


Nadrau

c. 800


Three seen feeding in a white flowered tree, 

filamentous flower. Also present, collared 

lory, wattled honeyeater, orange-breasted 

honeyeater.

Confirmed

DW obs. 


Watling

13 May 1985

Viti Levu

Mt. 


Tomaniivi

c. 800


Pair seen flying overhead at base of 

mountain.

Confirmed

DW obs. 


Watling

22 Oct 1986

Viti Levu

Mt. 


Tomaniivi

> 800


Two or three seen briefly, flying and then 

visiting a vuga tree.

Confirmed

DW obs. 


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

27

Watling



24 July 1991

Viti Levu

Mt. 

Tomaniivi 



(base)

c. 800


Pair in vuga with collared lory and wattled 

honeyeaters, for c. 15 minutes coming and 

going around the tree. At one point chased off 

a wattled honeyeater. 

Confirmed

DW obs. 


Kretzschmar

Jan 1993


Vanua 

Levu


Natewa 

Peninsula, 

Navonu 

Forest 


Station

<100

Two in flight in secondary forest 

(unconfirmed)4. After Cyclone Kina.

Unconfirmed

4

In litt. to DW 



Kretzschmar

c. 1993


Ovalau

Near airport



< 50

In flight.

Unconfirmed

4

In litt. to DW



Watling

12 Aug 1993

Viti Levu

Road to 


Nadrau

c. 800


Three seen on a flowering drala. Distant view 

for c. 10 minutes, feeding on flowers with 

collared lory.

Confirmed

DW obs.

Allport


Sept 1998

Viti Levu

Nausori 

Highlands



< 550

A single and a group of four or five. 

Observation was in dry conditions in the 

middle of an El Nino. 

Unconfirmed

3

In litt. to DW



Pohlman

26 June 


1999

Taveuni


Road to Des 

Voeux Peak

c.900

Single adult perched high in the canopy



Unconfirmed

3

In litt. to DW



Hayman

10 June 


2002

Viti Levu

Mt. 

Tomaniivi



800-1000

Two or three, visiting a red-flowered tree.

Unconfirmed

3

In litt. to DW 



and BLI

Skevington & 

Mathiesen

29 January 

2006

Taveuni


Road to Des 

Voeux Peak

900

16º50'20" S, 179º58'12" W. Possibly this 



species heard.

Unconfirmed

3

In litt. to DW 



(trip report)

Kretzschmar

2008

Viti Levu



Near Nadrau 

settlement

c. 800

Single bird seen feeding on Vuga. 



Additional 2 hrs at site without success and 

two intensive days of searching Vuga in 

Nadarivatu-Monasavu area – c.300 trees 

without success

Unconfirmed

4

In litt. to DW



nOTES:

1 Altitudes recorded in feet have been converted to metres. 

2 Visited site 3-4 times a year for about two days.

3 Observations are treated as unconfirmed if made without supporting photographs by: an 

individual; an individual with no or little experience of Fijian birds; in an area in which they have not 

previously been recorded. 

4 Kretzschmar is an experienced ornithologist with considerable Fijian experience (but see note 3).

A reference in the Appendix in Lees (1990) to a sighting in Taveuni has no supporting field data and 

is not included here.


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

29

Red-throated Lorikeet ‘Kulawai’ 



Charmosyna amabilis

Monasavu-Tomanivi, viti Levu

January–March 2011 survey report

DR KERRYN HERMAN

InTRODUCTIOn

The Red-throated Lorikeet, or ‘Kulawai’ (Charmosyna amabilis) is one of 14 members of 

the Charmosyna genus and is the only representative found across the Fijian islands. 

It is the eastern most distributed of the genus and is endemic to the Fiji islands. The 

genus is generally considered to inhabit mountainous areas of high rainfall (Juniper 

and Parr 1998) and are notoriously difficult to study (Beehler et. al 1986, cited in 

Swinnerton and Maljkovic 2002) . In Fiji all historical records across Viti Levu have been 

in the highlands, however records in Taveuni and Ovalau have been at lower elevations. 

Since 1993, no confirmed sightings of the species have been made though a number 

of unconfirmed records do exist. Previous reports have summerised the historic records 

of this species (see Swinnerton and Maljkovic 2002) and so this won’t be replicated in 

this document. However, in addition to these records, two unconfirmed sightings have 

since been recorded, one on the footslopes of Tomanivi and the other near Nadrau 

village (Watling pers com).

The Kulawai is listed as ‘Critically Endangered’ under IUCN redbook (IUCN 2011) listings 

and has been the focus of a number of surveys in recent years; as yet with no success in 

locating and subsequently confirming that the species is still extant. Much of this work 

has been carried out across the Tomanivi-Monasavu area in the Viti Levu Highlands, as 

this is believed to be the stronghold of the species. Some work has been undertaken 

further afield by local ornithologist Vilikesa Masibalavu, and Taveuni was surveyed in 

2002 (Swinnerton & Maljkovic 2002).

The aim of the current survey was to try and locate Kulawai in the Tomanivi-Monasavu 

area and confirm that the species persists.

PART 2


COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

30

ECOLOGy


What is known on the ecology of the Kulawai is limited to the few observations that have been 

made of the species and is in general anecdotal. 

The species is believed to be highly nectarivorous, and reliant on mature old growth forests 

(Swinnerton & Maljkovic 2002; BLI 2011 Fact sheet). Observations have placed it in the mid to 

upper canopy where is forages in the blossoms of local trees. The species is believed to be highly 

dependent on the Vuga (Metrosideros collina, Myrtaceae) blossom (NFMV fact sheet 2010), which 

was focused on during Swinnerton & Maljkovic (2002) survey. Most recent records of the species 

have placed it foraging in this tree (Watling pers com, Joerge Kretzschmar 2008).

Nothing is known on the species reproductive timing, habitat requirements or reproductive 

behaviour. Nothing is known on the species seasonal movements, however morphology would 

suggest that the species is highly mobile and capable of roaming over large areas in search of 

appropriate resources (D. Watling pers com).

LAnD USE AnD SITE LOCATIOnS

Over a six week period in February and March of 2011 surveys were undertaken in the Monasavu 

area of the Fijian highlands (Figure 1a).

The lands surveyed fall within the Nadala Village boundaries and land use is varied. Areas have, 

historically, been used for forestry with experimental plots of Eucalyptus deglupta and Pinus 

caribaea , interspersed with extensive areas of mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) plantation. These 

areas make up a mosaic with remnant native forest and modified agriculture land, some of which 

has been left fallow and is reverting to native cover.

Three broad native vegetation types can be distinguished across the survey area; Lowland 

Rainforest (to 700m asl), Upland Rainforest (700 – 850m asl) and Cloud Forest (+850m asl) (BLI 

2006). Within the upland forest, three more specific vegetation types have been identified, based 

on the environmental and physiognomic characteristics of the area (ECF 2006). These are:



 

Slope Forest: floristically diverse and encountered on the mountain slopes. Understorey is dense.



 

Ridge Forest: unique vegetation composition along undisturbed ridges, generally dominated by 

gymnosperms.

 

Riparian Vegetation: found along the many creeks and rivers, with common endemic species 

including Acalypha rivularis, Syzygium seemannianum and Ficus bambusifolia.

Cloud forest occurs on the higher peaks and is characterised by stunted growth forms (<6m), high 

precipitation and dense covers of bryophytes (ECF 2006).


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

31

The topography of the area is very rugged and steep, limiting access to much of the region. 



Roads, old forestry tracks and established walking tracks make up the majority of the access ways 

into much of the remnant forest. These tend to run along ridge lines. There are a number of peaks 

over 1000m asl, including Mt Tomanivi, which at 1,324m asl is Viti Levu’s (and subsequently Fiji’s) 

highest point. 

Two areas designated as Important Bird Areas (IBA) have been identified in the vicinity of the survey 

area. These are the Greater Tomanivi IBA (FJ07) and the Rairaimatuku Highlands IBA (FJ08) (Bird Life 

International 2006). Both these areas were peripherally included in this survey. However access into 

the heart of these IBA areas was prohibitive with the time available and weather conditions.

Climate within the survey area is classed as a cool, wet montane (ECF 2006), which is quite a 

contrast to the hot and humid tropica climate generally associated with Fiji. Rainfall is seasonal, 

with highest falls recorded from Dec-March (wet season). Daily experience found mornings tended 

to be dry, whist afternoons would invariably end up wet, with torrential rain beginning from around 

2pm and continuing until well after dark. This substantially impacted on the time available to 

effectively survey. 

Figure 1b provides a map of the survey area, replicated transect location as well as other areas 

walked in search of kulawai. 



Figure 1a: Viti Levu . Monasavu region identified by bordered area.

COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

32

Figure 1b: Survey area. Pink lines show the location of established transects, 

green lines show other tracks walked, and blue shows roadways driven. 

METHODS

Three standard survey methods were applied during the current survey; measured transects, timed 



point count surveys and general observations.

4.1 Transect surveys

A total of 7 transects were established throughout the survey period. Initially it was hoped to 

establish all transects at 1km in length. However, due to the topography and access to forested 

areas transect lengths were adapted to fit within the working environment. Sections of road, old 

forestry tracks and walking tracks were used as these gave an opening into the canopy where birds 

could be observed, as well as 10-20m penetration into the vegetation and canopy (depending 

on the transect). Transect information is provided in appendix 1. Transects were preferentially 

placed in areas where other nectarivorous bird species were prevalent, indicating an abundant 

food resource. The four indicator species were the Collared lorikeet (Kula Phigys solitarius), Wattled 

honeyeater (Kikau Foulehaio carunculata), Giant forest honeyeater (Ikou Gymnomyza viridis) and 

Orange-breasted myzomela (Delakula Myzomela jugularis). The start and end time of each transect 



Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

33

was waypointed to allow for accurate replication, and the actual route GPS to enable calculation of 



distances surveyed. Start and end time recorded on each pass. Generally transects were walked at 

approximately 1km/hr, though this varied depending on condition of track, or identification time. 

Surveys were undertaken from sunrise and completed within 4 hours post sunrise to correspond 

with maximum periods of bird activity (Swinnerton and Maljkovic 2002).

Records of birds seen or heard within 20m either side of the transect centre were taken. In 

particular focus was on the four indicator species and the Fiji parrot-finch (Kulakula Erythrura pealii). 

However, all other species were recorded as incidentals. 

Records were only taken of individuals seen or heard ahead of the observer. Any birds flying along 

the transect from behind were not recorded, unless they were a new species for that survey period. 

This was to reduce the chance of re-counting individuals. Local guides were also present, with 

their main task of looking for red-throated lorikeets. Training of guides in bird identification was 

undertaken along transect lines.

4.2  Point counts

Times point counts were undertaken at each end of the transects as well as the approximate 

midpoint of the transects lines. Appendix 2 provides the co-ordinates for each of the point count 

locations. Counts were undertaken over a 30min period, with all individuals heard or observed 

within approximately 100m radius recorded by the author. Two local guides were also undertaking 

observations, however their focus was on looking for signs of kulawai as well as developing their 

observation and identification skills.

4.3  Targeted observations

Surveys were undertaken in a number of the eucalypt plantations around the survey area. These 

were one of the few location where any flowering was observed and as such supported large 

numbers of nectarivorous avifauna. The plantation eucalypts Eucalyptus deglupta are members of 

the Myrtaceae family, as is the Vuga. The structure of the flowers are similar within the family, and 

as there were limited nectar resources observed throughout the survey area, it was thought that 

perhaps the lorikeets may be able to exploit alternate food sources to the Vuga. The prevalence of 

other nectarivores indicated that the nectar availability within the plantations was abundant and 

the eucalypts may indeed provide a seasonal resource for nectarivores in the Monasavu area. 

Towards the end of the survey period Vuga was found to be in flower on the western slopes above 

Monasavu Dam. Prior to this, the only observed flowering of the Vuga had been on the summit of 

Mount Tomanivi, which due to safety concerns and logistics was unable to surveyed. 

Observations were undertaken at flowering trees (both individual trees or small stands) for the 

duration of the flowering period. Observations were also undertaken at other species found to be 

flowering during the survey period. 



COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

34

4.4  Miscellaneous observations



Observations and species presence were recorded along drives to and from sites, along tracks and a 

number of additional point counts were undertaken off transects. 

RESULTS

A total of 558 hours were spent in the field searching for Kulawai. Of this total time about 500hrs 



can probably be considered as effective survey time – that is focus and concentration were at an 

optimum. Weather condition heavily influenced the amount of time available for effective surveying. 

Most mornings were found to be dry for the first 3-4 hours after sunrise, with rain generally setting 

in around the middle of the day and continuing throughout the afternoon. Unfortunately, whilst 

mornings tended to be dry, the cloud cover was dense and prohibitive for bird surveying.

5.1 Kulawai

No sightings of the Kulawai were recorded. Four unidentified green birds were recorded early on 

in the survey by one of the field guides. However, observations were of the back of the birds so the 

characteristic red-throat was unable to be confirmed. The distance over which the observations were 

made as well as the described size of the birds make it unlikely that the birds seen were Kulawai.

5.1.1  Foraging resources

For much of the survey period there were few, if any, noticeable flowering events across the greater 

study region. Small concentrated events were noticed within eucalypt plantations and individual 

eucalypt trees. Observations undertaken at these locations found high densities of nectarivorous 

species, with wattled honeyeaters and collared lorikeets the most abundant. Both myzomela 

and giant forest honeyeaters were also present. The detection of myzomela in the upper canopy 

was used as a positive indication that should they be present, red-throated lorikeets would be 

detectable from the forest floor. A Syzygium sp. (Myrtaceae) was also noted to be in flower during 

the survey period (pic). This was not flowering in high densities.

   


Syzygium sp. Photographed within the survey region.

Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

35

Prior to starting the surveys, substantial amounts of vure (Geissois superba) were noted to be 



in flower along a number of roadways. This included the roads to the southern and northern 

transmitter towers above Nadarivatu, and the road between Monasavu Dam and Navai. Once 

surveying started, these flowering events had finished. However, in early April, at the cessation of 

the surveys, vure was beginning to flower again.

Small areas of Turrillia ferruginea (Proteacea) displayed flowering through the survey period. 

Outside of the plantations this appeared to be the most widespread nectar resource, and 

was frequently found to have nectarivores foraging when located. Densities of birds were not 

comparable to plantations.

  

Turrillia ferruginea in flower in the survey region. This plant was the most abundant in flower throughout 



the survey period.

The final weeks of the survey period found consistent flowering of vuga on the western slopes 

above Monasavu dam. Individual plants were flowering along approximately 2km stretch of the 

access road to the weirs associated with the dam and the power generation. It was noted that the 

first trees found in flower were at higher altitudes and the progression of flowering was to lower 

sites, suggesting a possible temperature effect on the flowering of this species. Trees were noted 

to hold flowers for little more than a week once buds began to open, providing a finite window of 

opportunity for both foraging species and observers.

  

Metrosideros collina blossom. Large image shows the patchiness of the flowering during the survey 



period.

COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

36

5.2  Other Bird Species



Whilst undertaking focused searches for Red-throated Lorikeets, all other bird species encountered 

along transects and at points were recorded. A complete list of bird species recorded during the 

survey is presented in Appendix 3. All species expected to be recorded in the Monasavu area were 

recorded except for three species – Friendly ground dove (Gallicolumba stairi), Slaty Monarch 

(Mayrornis lesson) and Blue-crested Broadbill (Myiagra azureocapilla), and it is likely that the latter 

two were heard, but not recognised due to inexperience in call identification by the author. 

The recorded diversity of species is a positive indication that whilst much of the accessible areas 

of the Monasavu area have been modified for forestry and some agricultural use, there has been 

enough native forest retained to support a complete assemblage of native avian species. This 

further highlights the importance of this region for bird species conservation and should be the 

focus of ongoing management for avian conservation.

Of the systematic point count and transect surveys 7 species countered over 100 individuals when 

data were analyses. These seven most abundant species are presented in table 1.

1   2   3   4   5   6   7


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə