Lessons learned technical series



Yüklə 0.59 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə4/7
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü0.59 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

Table 1: Common avian species encountered during surveys.

Species name

Total count

Survey type

Wattled honeyeater 

Foulehaio carunculata

329

Point and transect



Silvereye 

Zosterops lateralis

 

269


Point and transect

Giant forest honeyeater 

Gymnomyza viridis

148


Point and transect

Collared lory 

Phigys solitarius

136


Point and transect

Polynesian triller 

Lalage maculosa

132


Point and transect

Fiji bush-warbler 

Cettia ruficapilla

127


Point and transect

White-rumped swiftlet 

Aerodramus spodiopygius

108


Point and transect

5.3  Endemic Species and High Conservation value 

Species

Fifteen of the bird species recorded during the survey are endemic to Fiji. These were recorded 



during both surveys and incidental sightings. Generally, these endemic species were abundant 

across the study region. Those species encountered at lower rates tended to be species that are 

considered to be of conservation significance.

Masked shining parrot Prosopeia tabuensis, listed as Near Threatened (IUCN Redbook) was 

widespread and whilst not abundant (26 individuals recorded along transects and points) it was 

regularly encountered across the study region. The Black-throated shrikebill Prosopeia tabuensis 

(IUCN Vulnerable) was observed along one transect (male and female) and was re-recorded 

on a replicate survey. After observation of this species, call identification was enhanced, and 



Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

37

subsequently this species was noted on a second transect based on call identification. The 



Vulnerable Pink-billed parrot finch Erythrura kleinschmidti was observed incidentally in the last 

week of the survey period along a section of roadway to the west of the Monasavu Dam and 

the Long-legged warbler Trichocichla rufa (IUCN Endangered) was observed incidentally whilst 

undertaking reconnaissance to establish survey locations. 

5.4  Introduced Avian Species

During the survey three species of invasive bird species were regularly recorded – Red-vented 

bulbul Pycnonotus cafer, Indian or Common myna Acridotheres tristis and the Jungle myna 

Acridotheres fuscus. These species were most abundant along roadways, tracks and easements. 

DISCUSSIOn

6.1 Kulawai

Unfortunately the continuing inability to locate the Kulawai may indicate that this species has in 

fact become extinct within Fiji. Careful consideration needs to be taken should this status change 

occur. However, the lack of ecological knowledge of this species may be contributing to the lack of 

records with surveys being designed more on luck that strategic scientific basis.

There are two potential hypothesis for the presence (or lack thereof) of the Kulawai in the 

Monasavu region over the survey period, if this area is indeed the stronghold of the species. 

The first hypothesis is that the species is nomadic and moves away from this area outside of peak 

vuga flowering times, in search of other food resources. The species’ wing design suggest the ability 

for the birds to fly long distances (Watling pers com), suggesting it may be nomadic, searching 

out appropriate food resources. This behavioural pattern is well known in a number of lorikeet 

species. For example the Australian Swift parrot (Lathamus discolor) migrates between mainland 

Australia and the blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) woodlands of Tasmania during the breeding 

season. Breeding corresponds with the peak flowering of the blue gum (SPRAT 2011). It may be that 

similar movement patterns occur in the Kulawai and the lack of food resources in the Monasavu 

region during the survey period indicates that the population of the species is elsewhere during 

low flowering period. The question then becomes one of where do the birds go? This hypothesis 

then raises the question of whether the flowering cycles of the vuga in the Monasavu region is an 

indicator of the presence and subsequent breeding of the red-throated lorikeet, assuming that the 

species is as dependant on this plant as believed. Again, should there be a connection between 

intense periods of flowering in the Monasavu and lorikeet breeding, one could then expect the 

potential detection for the species to increase during this period particularly if birds congregate 

in high resource. Birds also tend to call and be more obvious during breeding. This would then 

suggest that the region is a core breeding area, rather than the “stronghold” of the species. 

The second hypothesis is that the species remains in the Monasavu region throughout the year, 

but is much more widely dispersed and much more nomadic during periods of low food resource 

availability. This suggests that the species can utilise a range of flower types and as such is not 



COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

38

as dependant on the vuga as believed. This will dramatically decrease the chances of locating 



the species, which if it is already at naturally low densities will become even scarcer. This further 

decreases the chances of locating individuals outside of peak flowering seasons. Subsequently 

individuals will only congregate, thus making detection easier, during periods of high food 

resource availability. It was based on this hypothesis that time was spent in eucalypt plantations, 

that the abundance of food resources (both nectar and pollen) would be concentrated enough to 

pull Kulawai into the plantations from the wider rainforest. This was not substantiated during the 

survey period.

Either one of these hypothesis would direct the methodology and timing of surveying for the 

Kulawai. Paradoxically, without ecological knowledge on the species the best methods of surveying 

cannot be determined, but this knowledge will not be obtained without finding the species first.

At present, the survey methods will depend purely on chance. There are a number of possible 

ways to increase the chances of finding the species. The first of these is the timing of the surveys 

undertaken. In is the belief of the author that this survey, plus the other two reports of Swinnerton 

and Malikovic (2002) and Masibalavu and Mucklow (2008) were undertaken at the wrong time of 

the year to optimise the chances of locating Kulawai in the Monasavu region. 

Historic records of specimen collections as summarised in Swinnerton and Maljkovic (2002) have 

most individuals collected between May and October, Watling (pers comm.) observations fall within 

this time period and the last recorded observation of the species in 2008 was in July. Each of the 

recent surveys to locate Kulawai were undertaken over the wet season, with the 2002 survey run 

from November through to April, the 2008 survey undertaken in January and the current survey 

undertaken between January and March. For each survey Vuga (and other potential food resources) 

were noted to be patchy in flowering, but were the focus of intensive observational surveys. These 

methods have assumed that the second hypothesis – that birds are present all year round in the 

region – is the correct ecological assumption, and that individuals will be drawn to the patchy food 

resources available. To date this has obviously not resulted in the successful detection of the species.

Anecdotal observations indicate peak flowering of Vuga and other possible food sources occurs 

between April and July in the Monasavu area, with a second event between August and October 

(Swinnerton and Maljikovic 2002). These flowering event correspond with the historic collection 

dates and observation dates in the Monasavu. Should the peak flowering of Vuga be an important 

event in the Kulawai reproductive cycle (hypothesis 1), then this would suggest that these peak 

periods would be the optimal time to conduct surveys.

The timing of the survey is only one consideration. The actual methods applied also need to be 

considered. At this time, until confirmation of the species occurs and further ecological knowledge 

is obtained, again increasing the chance of locating individuals is the best bet to locating the 

Kulawai. 

A large scale field survey, timed to co-ordinate with a peak Vuga session may locate individuals. A 

number of teams of 2-3 people may be posited around the Monasavu area at areas of extensive 

flowering. Teams would spend a day at a single location observing the bird activity in the area. 

Volunteers for such a survey could be easily sourced from within the greater international birding 

community as the opportunity to spend time in an area with the avifauna that the Monasavu area 

supports would be appealing to many birders worldwide. By providing accommodation, transport 

to Nadala/Nadarivatu from Tavua and food, such a survey would also provide revenue for the local 

villages in the Monasavu region.


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

39

I believe at this time, the most effective method to try to confirm that the Kulawai is extant is to get 



as many bodies on the ground as possible during a peak flowering event of Vuga. Timing does not 

necessarily have to co-ordinate with the beginning of this event; in fact it would probably be more 

effective to time the surveys from the middle towards the end of the flowering events. This will give 

time for birds to arrive in the region in response to the event, and hopefully time surveys with peak 

numbers of individuals in the region. 

6.2  Other Avian Species

The record of all (bar 3) bird species expected in the Monasavu region is a good indication that the 

assemblage in this region is still intact and the ongoing land management has not caused a loss of 

species in the region. The impact of land management on the abundance of individuals is unknown 

however, anecdotally, there are stark contrasts in the activity of birds in the mahogany plantations 

with native forest; the plantations appear to support few if any birds, and there are elevated 

numbers of nectarivores in the eucalypt plantations during periods of flowering. 

Surveys undertaken in 2006 by ECF failed to locate owls in the region, though they were believed 

to occur there. Confirmation of the presence of Barn owls Tyto alba in the region occurred during 

the current surveys. An individual was observed early morning on the Monasavu Road and a pellet 

was discovered at the base of Monasavu Dam. 

The SPREP Bird Conservation Priorities and a Draft Conservation Strategy for the Pacific Islands 

region (Sherley 2001) identifies the lack of a national project to monitor the forest birds of Fiji as a 

key area that needs developing. This requirement stems directly from the Fiji Biodiversity Strategy 

and Action Plan: Objective 2.4: Achieve a detailed knowledge of the occurrence and status over time 

of Fiji’s biodiversity resources, in particular the threatened endemic forms – Action 36.Objective 4.1: 

Effectively manage threatened species – Actions 60, 61, 63

The general avian surveys undertaken during this study may contribute to establishing a number 

of locations in the Monasavu area to contribute to the ongoing monitoring of the forest birds of 

Fiji. Ongoing surveying of the established transects, will over time, enable a more comprehensive 

understanding of what is happening with regards to the forest avifauna.

6.3  Invasive Species

The increasing use of the forest around the Monasavu region for forestry, agriculture and other 

purposes is opening up access to these forests for invasive avian species. Surveys undertaken in 

2008 by Masibalavu and Mucklow failed to locate either common or jungle myna at one of her 

survey sites and she considered them to be generally uncommon at other survey sites. Red-vented 

bulbul were considered very common however (Masibalavu and Mucklow 2008). This current 

survey found similar abundances of red-vented bulbul, but increased numbers of common myna. 

Miscellaneous observations also found high numbers of this species around the banks of the 

Monasavu dam, and prevalent along powerline easements and walking tracks. These tracks are 

increasing the penetration of these aggressive, introduced species into the remaining forest which 

may contribute not only to the decline of the red-throated lorikeet, but also may impact on the 

sustainable populations of other avian species.

Blanvillain et al (2003) found that both common myna and red-vented bulbul contributed to the 

decline in the breeding success of the Tahiti flycatch (Pomarea nigra), and Thibault et al (2002) suggest 



COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

40

that both these introduced species are compounding extinction effects on Polynesian monarchs. 



Pell and Tidemann (1997) found directly that mynas were more aggressive in the competition for 

nest hollows, out competing a number of Australian parrot species. There may be size parameters 

that limit direct competition between mynas and kulawai for nest hollows, however there may be an 

overlap in hollow sizes that once accessible to the lorikeets are now no longer available. This potential 

loss of breeding resource, combined with habitat loss and increasing nest predation from introduced 

rodents, may be another contributing factor to the apparent decline in the Kulawai.

6.4  Survey Constraints

As with all other surveys in the Monasavu region the main constraints to the current survey were 

access to forested areas and weather conditions. The topography of the region is mountainous, 

with steep drop offs, confining most access ways to ridgelines or along waterways. Subsequently 

large tracts of forest are literally inaccessible. These access issues may bias the results of both 

surveys for kulawai and general bird surveys. It is likely that disturbance tolerant species, including 

invasive species, will be more readily detected along established transects. More cryptic and “non-

edge” species will be harder to detect. 

Weather played havoc to surveys, confining most of the survey work to the mornings. Generally 

mid-day and afternoons were rained out. Mornings were also plagued by low cloud, impacting on 

observational distances.

6.5  Community Involvement

A secondary outcome of this survey was the involvement and training of two local community 

members. Both provided local knowledge of the area, as well as access to village land. It is hoped 

that the skills passed on in bird identification and survey planning – such as the need for accurate 

information to be communicated by local guides – will enable the development of eco-tourism 

ventures based around birding. The Monasavu region supports a unique avifauna, which will 

appeal to many travellers. Combining this demand with local knowledge, accommodation, 

transport requirements and catering, there is the potential to develop a sustainable industry that 

will benefit not just the trained guides, but the community as a whole. If home stays are arranged, 

the local women engaged to cater for tour groups or local drivers contracted to provide transport 

from Tavua to and around the mountains, the entire region should be able to benefit.

The skills learnt by local community members will also be passed onto other community groups. 

The involvement of the Tomanivi Nature Club will become invaluable in the ongoing monitoring 

of not only Kulawai, but the avifauna as a whole in the region. The Nature Club was establish and is 

run with the guidance and support of NatureFiji–MareqetiViti. 

Conclusion

Unfortunately the outcomes of this survey raise further questions as to the likelihood that the 

Kulawai has in fact gone extinct. There has been no confirmed record of this species in recent times, 

and specific, targeted surveys have failed to turn up any signs of the species. Survey timing may 

have a significant influence on the inability to detect the species and until surveys are run at other 

times of the year, any changes of status to the species should be refrained from being made.



Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

41

General bird surveys and locations of transects may be the first step in establishing a formal, long 



term project to monitor the avifauna in the Monasavu region. This area supports a high number 

of species, and it appears that the natural species assemblage has been maintained in the region, 

regardless of past land management. This should be considered should any future plans to modify 

the local landscape be developed. 

Reference

Beehler, B.M., Pratt, T.K. and Zimmerman, D.A. 1986. Birds of New Guinea. Princeton: Princeton 

University Press.

Birdlife International (2006) Important bird areas in Fiji: Conserving Fiji’s natural heritage. Suva, Fiji: 

Birdlife International Pacific Partnership Secretariat. 

Blanvillain, C., Salducci, J. M., Tutururai, G., and Maeura, M. (2003). Impact of introduced birds on 

the recovery of the Tahiti Flycatcher (Pomarea nigra), a critically endangered forest bird of Tahiti 

Biological Conservation, 109, pp 197-205

ECF ( 2006). Management Plan for the Tomanivi Nature Reserve, Ba. Unpublished report prepared for 

Department of Forests by Environment Consultants Fiji, on behalf of Bird Life International, Fiji.

IUCN 2011. Accessed July 2011. Charmosyna amabilis. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 

2011.1.

Juniper, T. and Parr, M. 1998. Parrots: a guide to the parrots of the world. Pica press.

Masibalavu, V.,and Mucklow, C. (2008). Red-throated Lorikeet Survey January 2008 including 

recommendations for future survey work for this Critically Endangered species in Fiji. Unpublished 

report.


Pell and Tidemann (1997) The impact of two exotic hollow-nesting birds on two native parrots in 

Savannah woodland in eastern Australia. Biological Conservation, 79, pp 145 153.

Swinnerton, K. and Maljikovic, A. (2002). The Red-throated Lorikeet in the Fiji Island. Unpublished 

report prepared for the National Trust for Fiji, World Parrot Trust and Environment Consultants Fiji 

(ECF).

Thibault, J-C., Martin, J-L., Penloup, A. And Meyer, J-Y. (2002). Understanding the decline and 



extinction of monarchs (Aves) in Polynesian Islands. Biological Conservation, 108, pp 161–174

Sherley, G. (2001) South Pacific Regional Environment Plan (SPREP) Bird Conservation Priorities and a 

Draft Conservation Strategy for the Pacific Islands region. Apia, Samoa.

SPRAT (2011). Accessed July 2011 www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicspecies.

pl?taxon_id=744

Watling, D. (2001). A guide to the birds of Fiji and Western Polynesia: including American Samoa, Niue, 

Samoa, Tokelau, Tuvalu and Wallis and Futuna. Suva, Fiji. Environmental Consultants (Fiji) Ltd. 


COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

42

Appendix 1



TRAnSECT LOCATIOn AnD DESCRIPTIOn

ID

Start 

point 

(WGS 

72)

End point 

(WGS 72)

Length 

(m)

Location description

Replicates

NDL


602886 

8051016


602961 

8050099


1000

Behind Nadala village, access from road 

running behind school, track runs north/

south towards Navai. Combination of 

open, agricultural land and forest.

2 – both 

rained out

KR1


599384 

8055562


599489 

8054658


925

Walking track of road to Koro towers. 

Track runs north/south. Track runs 

through forestry land, into plantation 

mahogany. End point before plantation 

starts.


2 – second 

replicate 

rained out

NDR1


603584 

8045580


602827 

8045723


1000

Forestry track runs from Nadrau Road to 

river. Runs through combination forestry/

impacted agricultural land and forest. 

Used is other surveys, and is believed 

to be general location where last 2008 

observation occurred. Runs east/west.

2

NDR2



604199 

8044857


603896 

8044430


1700

Loop of track through forest. Northern 

section established as access to power 

line easement. Runs east west of Nandra 

Road, and loops back, with parallel track 

south of access track.

2

NDR3


603107 

8042671


604056 

8042850


1100

Southern most transect off Nadrau Road. 

Runs from west to east through old 

growth, low impacted forest. Initial access 

through agricultural land. Runs towards 

edge of Monasavu lake.

2

MSV1


607904 

8041516


608677 

8041048


1000

Northern most Transect of Monasavu 

Road. Old forestry track, beginning to 

overgrow. Runs south/north through low 

impacted forest.

2

MSV2



606052 

8045657


606112 

8046274


650

Section of road along Monasavu Road. 

Selected due to high levels of Vure in 

flower at initiation of surveys. Runs 

through forest, with good views down 

into canopy. End at walking track that 

heads to Monasavu Lake.

2


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

43

Appendix 2



POInT COUnT LOCATIOn 

Transect ID

Point ID

Easting (WGS 

72)

Northing 

1   2   3   4   5   6   7


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə