Lessons learned technical series



Yüklə 0.59 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə7/7
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü0.59 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

Details

Amount ($)

Hire of exhibition space

$500:00

Catering for 100 people



$1,500:00

Fuel 


$80:00

Miscellaneous expense ( blu tack + kava + lunch)

$67:25

Total expenses

$2147.25

Table 2: Summary of the revenue received during and after Animal model exhibition launch.

Total Revenue expected

Quantity No. sold/ 

No. available

Expected Amount ($)

(a)Amount received 

($)


Tickets sold @ $20 each

75/100


$2,000 

$1,500:00 

sponsor for animal models 

18/20


$4,000 

$4,444:20 

Total amount on paintings 

that have received biddings 

(

only highest bidder for each 



model recorded as of 8

th

 June 



2012)

7/20


$2000

$1400:00


Total amount received

 

 

$7,344:20

Excess of Income over Expenditure as of the 22nd June 2012: $5,196.95 FJD

DISCUSSIOn

130 people attended the Fiji Museum animal model exhibition organized by NatureFiji-

MareqetiViti, which included members, guests, sponsors and the general public and the press. Two 

presentations were given highlighting the plight of Fiji’s threatened species especially the Kulawai. 

The models created a great deal of interest and awareness of the threatened animal species and 

this will be continued with the exhibition at the Museum remaining until the end of July at least. 

Awareness was raised of the activities undertaken by NatureFiji-MareqetiViti, especially with the 

Tomaniivi Nature Club (TNC) consisting of a group of youths from Nadala and nearby villages, 

situated near Mt. Tomaniivi, the area where the last confirmed sighting of the Kulawai, Red-throated 

Lorikeet was made.

This report reflects the revenue and expenses received from the 1st – 22nd June 2012. Masi 

paintings are still available for auction which will end on the 29th of July. Two animal models are 

available for sponsorship until the end of August 2012. 

For details on the animal model sponsors see Appendix 3.



Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

69

REFEREnCES



Herman, K. J. 2011. Red-throated Lorikeet “Kulawai” Charmosyna amabilis Monasavu-Tomanivi, Viti 

Levu. Report from January – March 2011 survey. Unpublished NatureFiji – MareqetiViti Report # 

MV18: 2011/06, Suva.

IUCN list of threatened species, Version 2011.2, viewed 8th June 2012.

APPENDIx 1 ExHIBITION FLYER


COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

70

APPEnDIx 2: SPOnSORSHIP AGREEMEnT



Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

71

APPENDIx 3: ANIMAL MODEL SPONSOR DETAILS



Sponsor

Animal model sponsored

Amount sponsored ($)

Siwatibau & Sloan barristers

 and solicitors

Rotuman myzomela

& Pink-billed parrotfinch

$400:00 FJD

Raintree lodge

Masked shinning parrot

$200:00 FJD

Austrop foundation

Pacific sheath-tail bat & Fijian flying fox

$500:00 AUS

Birdlife International Pacific 

Secretariat

Red throated lorikeet; Collared petrel;

Bristled thighed curlew

$900:00 FJD

Natural Solutions Pacific

Silktal

$200: 00FJD



Wildlife Conservation Society

Baby vonu & Hawksbill turtle

$400:00 FJD

Multiple Intelligence School

Black tipped-reef shark

$200:00 FJD

Marita Brodie

Fijian burrowing snake

$300:00 FJD

National Trust of Fiji

Crested Iguana

$200:00 FJD

Gilianne Brodie

Giant Fiji long-horned beetle

$200:00 FJD

Environment Consultants Fiji Ltd

Fijian copper-headed skink

$300:00 FJD

Suliana Siwatibau

Fiji ground frog

$200:00 FJD

BSP bank


Giant Forest Honeyeater

$200:00 FJD

Kadavu fantail

Yet to be sponsored

Kadavu whistling dove

Yet to be sponsored



COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

72

APPENDIx 4: MASI PAINTINGS ‘SILENT AUCTION’ DETAILS



(as at June 22nd 2012)

Pacific 


Sheath-tail bat [ID: PST_05]

Pink billed parrot-finch [ID: PBP_20]

Red-throated Lorikeet [ID: LRK_16]

$150:00


Mary

$181:00


Matt Capper 

$333:33


J Sloan 

 Lorikeet [ID: LRK_08]

$333:33

J Sloan


Rotuman myzomela [ID: RMA_14]

$333:33


JSloan

Silkatil [ID: SL_02]

$100:00

Deidre Madden



Young turtles [ID: TRT_07]

shark [ID: SHK_12]

Fiji burrowing snake [ID: FBS_06]

Bristled thighed curlew [ID: BTC_15]

Collared petrel [ID: CLP_18]

Crested Iguana [ID: CI_01]

Fiji flying fox [ID: FFF_10]

Fiji Giant long horn beetle  [ID: LHB_09]

Fijian copper headed skink [ID: CHS_13]

Fijian ground frog [ID: FGF_04]

Giant forest honeyeater [ID: GFH_03]

$101  


Nick & Natalie Askew

Hawksbill turtle [ID: HBT_11]

Kadavu fantail [ID: KFT_17]

$100:00


Mary

Kadavu whistling dove [ID: wsd_19]

$100:00

Deidre Madden



Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji   COMPLETIOn REPORT

73

CEPF Small Grant Final Project Completion Report 



Organization Legal Name

Fiji Nature Conservation Trust

Project Title

Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

Date of Report

31st July 2012

Report Author and Contact Information

Dick Watling 

CEPF Region

Polynesia-Micronesia Hotspot

Strategic Direction 

Strategic Direction 3. Build awareness and participation of local leaders and community members 

in the implementation of protection and recovery plans for threatened species.

Grant Amount

 $ 19,173

Project Dates

1 November 2010 – 30 June 2012

Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji

BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION 

LESSONS LEARNED TECHNICAL SERIES

PART 5


COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

74

Implementation Partners for this Project 



Please explain the level of involvement for each partner 

Department of Environment – overview – receives copies of all reports prepared and updates and 

NBSAP meetings;



Ba Provincial Authorities – overview – receives reports and updates for local district meetings;

Tomaniivi Nature Club – the Site Support Group for the Tomaniivi IBA/KBA – co-implementer of the 

project;


BirdLife International Fiji Programme and Conservation International – provision of advice when 

needed.


Conservation Impacts 

Please explain/describe how your project has contributed to the implementation of the CEPF 

ecosystem profile

The project has provided the longest series of searches for the Critically Endangered Red-throated 

Lorikeet, ever undertaken. In recent times (since 1965) this small lorikeet has only been recorded 

with certainty from the Tomaniivi IBA/KBA and adjacent forests and is one of the key species 

contributing to the designation of the Tomaniivi IBA/KBA. As such the work done has been a 

major contribution to our knowledge of the importance of the site, specifically for its role in the 

conservation of the Red-throated Lorikeet.

That the project’s searches have failed to confirm the continued existence of the Red-throated 

Lorikeet gives rise to the greatest concern. The last confirmed sighting of the Red-throated Lorikeet 

was in 1993, although there have been several unconfirmed sightings since that time, the current 

project’s work added to the several other unsuccessful searches for the Lorikeet in the past decade, 

means that we now have to acknowledge that Red-throated Lorikeet may well have been extirpated 

from Viti Levu. We have not done enough survey work on Taveuni where there remains significant 

undisturbed forest to reach a similar conclusion from there.

Please summarize the overall results/impact of your project against the expected results detailed 

in the approved proposal

1.  A professional forest survey programme set up specifically for the Red-throated Lorikeet, and 

implemented.

2.  No confirmed or unconfirmed sighting of the Red-throated Lorikeet – we need to acknowledge 

now that Red-throated Lorikeet is probably extirpated on Viti Levu;

3.  Training for community members in bird observation and monitoring. Not very successful, 

however, two members of the Tomaniivi Nature Club trained and competent in searching for 

the Red-throated Lorikeet. One of whom, a lady became a proficient bird observer and very 

interested. However, it was not possible to train a cadre of youth in bird observation such that 

they could meaningfully regularly monitor transects and sites for the Red-throated Lorikeet. 

This was because of a variety of factors including logistics (sites were not close enough to the 

villages to be easily accessed at the right time of day); difficulties in teaching untrained birders to 


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji   COMPLETIOn REPORT

75

accurately identify birds that they have no experience of; difficulties in maintaining interest in 



the absence of the trainer and/or incentives.

4.  The potential for an ecotourism initiative, specifically bird guiding at Tomaniivi centered around 

one community member who did become a proficient bird observer and was keen to initiate a 

bird guiding programme for tourists, was evaluated on site by an overseas specialist;

5.  Activities that raised the awareness of the Tomaniivi Nature Club as well as community members 

and local schools about the Red-throated Lorikeet. This included a visit and workshop by the 

Kulawai – the National Women’s volleyball team as part of a National HIV Awareness Programme.

6.  Very successful function held at the Fiji Museum in the name of the Red-throated Lorikeet where 

models of Fiji’s endangered species made from recycled materials were exhibited and then 

auctioned with good publicity. An exhibition on display at Fiji Museum for nearly three months.

7.  A detailed Species Recovery Plan prepared.

Please provide the following information where relevant

 

„

Hectares Protected: N/A



 

„

Species Conserved: N/A



 

„

Corridors Created: N/A



Describe the success or challenges of the project toward achieving its short-term and long-term 

impact objectives

The project has provided a highly significant contribution in respect of our knowledge of the 

Red-throated Lorikeet – one of the IBA/KBAs most important species. Unfortunately, the result 

was a negative one – there is no evidence of its continued existence, which in itself is still highly 

significant, such that we need now to acknowledge that the Red-throated Lorikeet may well be 

extinct.

The bulk of the survey work was undertaken by highly experienced bird observers, rather than 

community members, as such there is little doubt about the overall outcome – no confirmed or 

unconfirmed observations. 

In retrospect, it was probably unrealistic to believe that one could train community youth to a level 

where they could independently undertake surveys for species such as the Red-throated Lorikeet 

which is both extremely rare (perceived situation at the beginning of the project) as well as being 

extremely difficult to detect (retiring, crepuscular nature of the bird). Nonetheless the awareness 

raised during the project was excellent and there is at least one lady with the ability, interest and 

energy to undertake bird guiding for tourists.

The project was able to leverage a visit and report by two experienced overseas persons on the 

ecotourism potential of the area and the Tomaniivi Nature Club.

A very successful function was held at the Fiji Museum in the name of the Red-throated Lorikeet 

where models of Fiji’s endangered species made from recycled materials were exhibited and then 

auctioned with good publicity. An exhibition on the Red-throated Lorikeet and other endangered 

species was on display at Fiji Museum for nearly three months.



COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

76

Were there any unexpected impacts (positive or negative)?



It was unexpected and very concerning that we would not observe the Red-throated Lorikeet 

during the project.

The following reports were prepared during the project:

Herman, K. J. 2011. Red-throated Lorikeet “Kulawai” Charmosyna amabilis Monasavu-Tomanivi, Viti 

Levu. Report from January – March 2011 survey. Unpublished NatureFiji – MareqetiViti Report # 

MV18: 2011/06, Suva.

Macedru, K. 2012. Promoting Awareness of the Kulawai, Red-throated Lorikeet Charmosyna 

amabilis. An Exhibition of Models and Masi Paintings of Endangered Fijian Fauna at the Fiji Museum 

and their Auction for the Project. Unpublished NatureFiji – MareqetiViti Report # MV18: 2012/11, 

Suva.


Masibalavu, V. 2011. Reports of surveys of the Red-throated Lorikeet, Kulawai Charmosyna amabilis 

with the Tomaniivi Nature Club, Nadala, Ba, Vti Levu. Unpublished NatureFiji – MareqetiViti Report # 

MV18: 2011/12, Suva.

Steven, Rochelle 2012. An investigative study into whether the Nadala/Vatumoli area could 

support nature-based tourism; and, a survey for the Critically Endangered Red-throated Lorikeet 

(Charmosyna amabilis). Unpublished report prepared for NatureFiji-MareqetiViti, Griffith School 

of Environment and International Centre for Ecotourism Research, Griffith University, Queensland, 

Australia

Watling, Dick 2011. Report on the Birds with Particular Reference to Threatened Species of the 

Wainavadu-Waisoi Catchments, Namosi, Viti Levu, Fiji. Unpublished NatureFiji-MareqetiViti Report # 

MV18: 2011/11, Suva

Watling, Dick 2012. Kulawai Red-throated Lorikeet Charmosyna amabilis Species Recovery Plan 

2013-2017. Unpublished NatureFiji-MareqetiViti Report # MV18: 2012/20, Suva


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji   COMPLETIOn REPORT

77

Lessons Learned



Describe any lessons learned during the design and implementation of the project, as well as any 

related to organizational development and capacity building. Consider lessons that would inform 

projects designed or implemented by your organization or others, as well as lessons that might be 

considered by the global conservation community.

The primary objective of the project – to provide up to date information on the Red-throated 

Lorikeet was realized, although in the end the bulk of the work was undertaken by highly 

experienced bird observers rather than trained community members.

In retrospect, it was probably unrealistic to believe that with the resources the project could offer, 

one could train community youth to a level where they could independently undertake surveys for 

species such as the Red-throated Lorikeet which is both extremely rare (perceived situation at the 

beginning of the project) as well as being extremely difficult to detect (retiring, crepuscular nature 

of the bird). 

Project Design Process: (aspects of the project design that contributed to its success/

shortcomings)

Centering the project on the Tomaniivi Nature Club Site Support Group enabled the small grant 

resources to be applied immediately to activities with known individuals/communities. This 

dispensed with the necessary preliminaries of entry into and getting to know a new community(s) 

and their environment. Despite this we underestimated the logistical requirements (time and cost) 

of getting community members into the right location to undertake meaningful surveys for the 

Red-throated Lorikeet.

On the other-hand the project was flexible enough to switch the survey component to surveys 

being done by highly experienced bird observers, such that they were professionally implemented.

Project Implementation: (aspects of the project execution that contributed to its success/

shortcomings)

The project was flexible enough to switch the survey component to surveys originally planned 

for community members, being done by highly experienced bird observers, such that they were 

professionally implemented. This was especially important in that the initial surveys with the 

community members did not reveal any Red-throated Lorikeets indicating that a broader survey 

effort was required.

Overall the number and location of surveys combined with the experience of the observers 

provided a high level of confidence in the ‘negative’ result.

Other lessons learned relevant to conservation community:

Although an attractive idea to both the community and the umbrella organisation, expecting 

untrained community members to become trained to make useful scientific observations of an 

extremely rare and difficult to detect bird, was probably unrealistic. This might be considered 

specific to the situation at Tomaniivi, the nature of the bird and the resources available from a small 

grant, but it also likely to be true in many similar situations when the competence of communities 

to be trained to undertake scientific observations is overestimated.



COnSERvATIOn InTERnATIOnAL

Biodiversity Conservation Lessons Learned Technical Series

78

Additional Funding



Provide details of any additional donors who supported this project and any funding secured for 

the project as a result of the CEPF grant or success of the project. 

Donor

Type of funding



*

Amount


Notes

Dr Kerryn Herman 

A

$18,000


Six weeks as volunteer 

community trainer and 

expert search coordinator

Environment Consultants Fiji

A

$9,500


15 Red-throated Lorikeet 

search days by Dick Watling 

with associated costs

Clare Morrison, Rochelle Steven, 

Griffith University

A

$7,000



One week survey work and 

evaluation of ecotourism 

potential report

Anne O’Brien of Anniemals 

B

$3,000


20 models of endangered 

Fijian animals made from 

recycled materials and 

15 paintings auctioned 

for Red-throated Lorikeet 

project


 

*

Additional funding should be reported using the following categories:



A  Project co-financing (Other donors contribute to the direct costs of this CEPF project)

B  Grantee and Partner leveraging (Other donors contribute to your organization or a partner organization as 

a direct result of successes with this CEPF project.)

C  Regional/Portfolio leveraging (Other donors make large investments in a region because of CEPF investment 

or successes related to this project.)

Sustainability/Replicability

Summarize the success or challenge in achieving planned sustainability or replicability of project 

components or results. 

Further work on the Red-throated Lorikeet will not seek to replicate the community involvement 

envisaged by this project. It will rely entirely on expert input until such time as a site is located 

where the species can be regularly observed.

NatureFiji-MareqetiViti intends to follow up on the ecotourism-bird guiding potential with the 

community members trained during the project.

Summarize any unplanned sustainability or replicability achieved.

None


Building community support to search for the Red-throated Lorikeet in Fiji   COMPLETIOn REPORT

79

Safeguard Policy Assessment



Provide a summary of the implementation of any required action toward the environmental and 

social safeguard policies within the project.

None required

Information Sharing and CEPF Policy

CEPF is committed to transparent operations and to helping civil society groups share experiences, 

lessons learned, and results. Final project completion reports are made available on our website, 

www.

cepf.net


, and publicized in our newsletter and other communications. 

Full contact details:

Name: Dick Watling

Organization name: NatureFiji-MareqetiViti

Mailing address: Box 2041, Government Buildings, Suva , Fiji

Tel: +679 3100598

E-mail: 

watling@naturefiji.org



BIODIvERSITy

 

COnSERvATIOn



 

LESSONS LEARNED 



TECHNICAL SERIES

24
1   2   3   4   5   6   7


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə