M. K. Vasudeva Rao, Shiv Ranjani Housing Society, Pune, India



Yüklə 4.31 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü4.31 Mb.

9384

No

te

LOGOs


Journal of Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 September 2016 | 8(11): 9384–9390

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2682.8.11.9384-9390   

Editor: M.K. Vasudeva Rao, Shiv Ranjani Housing Society, Pune, India. 

Date of publication: 26 September 2016 (online & print)

Manuscript details: Ms # 2682 | Received 20 April 2016 | Final received 13 July 2016 | Finally accepted 02 September 2016

Citation: R. Ramasubbu, C. Divya & S. Anjana (2016). A note on the taxonomy, field status and threats to three endemic species of Syzygium (Myrtaceae) from the 

southern Western Ghats, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa 8(11): 9384–9390; http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/jott.2682.8.11.9384-9390



Copyright: © Ramasubbu et al. 2016. Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. JoTT allows unrestricted use of this article in any medium, reproduc-

tion and distribution by providing adequate credit to the authors and the source of publication.



Funding: DST- SERB, New Delhi, India (SB/YS/LS-118/ 2013 dated 30.10.2013) 

Conflict of Interest: The authors declare no competing interests.

Acknowledgements:  We thank DST- SERB, New Delhi, India for providing funds (SB/YS/LS-118/ 2013 dated 30.10.2013) to carry out the research. 

A note on the taxonomy, field status 

and threats to three endemic species of 

Syzygium (Myrtaceae) from the southern 

Western Ghats, India

R. Ramasubbu

 1

, C. Divya

 2

 & S. Anjana

 3

1,2,3 


Department of Biology, The Gandhigram Rural Institute - Deemed 

University, Dindigul, Tamil Nadu 624302, India

racprabha@yahoo.com (corresponding author), 



divyabotany111@gmail.com, 

anjana27v@gmail.com



Myrtaceae, the myrtle family, of 

the order Myrtales, comprises about 

130–150 genera and 5650 species.  

This family is distributed in tropical 

and  concentrated  in  America  as 

well as Malesia and Australia.  The 

species of this family are known for 

their rich volatile oils which are of 

medicinal importance.  Myrtaceae is 

easily distinguished from the other 

related families by tanniferous evergreen trees or shrubs 

with simple and more or less pellucid punctate leaves 

with  oil  glands,  curving  nerves  anastomosing  distally 

into  intra-marginal  nerves;  numerous  brightly  colored 

and  conspicuous  epigynous  stamens,  bisexual  flowers 

with calyptrate or non calyptrate petals; actinomorphic, 

ovary inferior or semi-inferior (Vinodkumar 2003).

About 1,100 species of trees and shrubs which have 

a native range extending from Africa and Madagascar to 

southern Asia (Raju et al. 2014).  The evergreen forests 

in the high ranges of the southern Western Ghats are 

a  potential  region  for  the  distribution  of  Syzygium  in 

India.  Most of the species of Syzygium are economically 

important  as  they  are  a  source  of  timber,  essential 

oils,  spices,  edible  fruits,  fuelwood  and  also  in  folk 

medicine.  The  leaves  and  bark  of  most  of  the  species 

of this genus have antibacterial (Shyamala & Vasantha 

2010),  anti-inflammatory  (Chaudhuri  et  al.  1990), 

antimicrobial  (Kiruthiga  et  al.  2011),  antifungal  (Park 

et  al.  2007;  Ayoola  et  al.  2008),  antitumor  (Kiruthiga 

et  al.  2011),  antihyperglycemic  (Rekha  et  al.  2010), 

antihyperlipidemic,  antioxidant  (Nassar  et  al.  2007), 

antidiabetic  (Nonaka  et  al.  1992;    Kumar  et  al.  2008), 

antigastric  and  anti-HIV  properties  (Reen  et  al.  2006).  

The bark of the trees is employed in folk medicine for 

the  treatment  of  inflammation  (Muruganandan  et  al. 

2001). 

Being  an  economically  important  genus,  most 



species of Syzygium are overexploited for their valuable 

compounds from parts like leaves, bark, and seeds and 

thereby are under  severe threat of  extinction.   Of  the 

52 species reported from the Western Ghats, 26 species 

of Syzygium have been listed under the IUCN Red List 

category.  Among them, five species are included under 

Critically  Endangered  and  eight  species  are  under  the 

Endangered category. Of the species under danger, the 

following three species, Syzygium densiflorum Wall. ex 

Wight & Arn., Syzygium myhendrae (Bedd. ex Brandis) 

Gamble and Syzygium travancoricum Gamble, have not 

received much attention from conservation perspective.   

All  the  tree  species  have  potential  biochemical 

compounds which are used in several indigenous health 

care  systems.    Overexploitation,  habitat  degradation, 

irregular  phenological  events,  lower  productivity  and 

lesser seedling establishment in the natural habitat are 

the  real  factors  for  the  vanishing  of  the  population  of 

most  of  the  species  of  Syzygium  (Vinodkumar  2003).  

ISSN 0974-7907 (Online)

ISSN 0974-7893 (Print)

OPEN ACCESS


Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 September 2016 | 8(11): 9384–9390

9385

Syzygium species from southern Western Ghats 

Ramasubbu et al.

To  prevent  the  population  reductions,  alternative 

strategies  are  to  be  developed  to  protect  these  little 

known  important  tree  species.    In  order  to  assess  the 

population density of all the three species of Syzygium

extensive field trips were conducted in different forest 

areas  of  Western  Ghats  of  Kerala  (Agasthyamalai) 

and  Tamil  Nadu  (Megamalai,  Palni  hills,  Nilgiry)  from 

October  2014  to  April  2016.    Further,  the  populations 

of  S.travancoricum  were  also  located  at  Kalasamala 

Kavu,  the  sacred  grove  of  Kerala.    The  distributional 

status  of  the  species  was  confirmed  through  field 

visit,  consultation  with  herbarium  specimens  and  also 

through  standard  literature.    All  the  three  species  of 



Syzygium were monitored periodically for flowering and 

fruiting phenology, seed germination in in vitro and in 

vivo, insects or pests, etc. 

Syzygium densiflorum 

Wall.  ex  Wight  &  Arn.,  Prodr.  329.  1834;  Nair  & 

Henry. Fl. Tamil Nadu 1. 1983. Vajr., Fl. Palghat District 

199. 1990; Anil Kumar, Fl. Pathanamthitta District 265. 

1994; Sasidharan et al. KFRI research report. 99. 8. 1994. 

Sasidh.,  Fl.  Periyar  Tiger  Reserve  137.  1998;  Sasidh., 

Fl.  Chinnar  Wildlife  Sanctuary  129.  1999;  Mohanan 

&  Sivad.,  Fl.  Agasthyamala  261.  2002.  Sasidharan  et 

al.  KFRI  research  report.  282.  2006.  Nayar  et  al.  Fl. 

Plant  of  Kerala  451.2006;  Maridass,  Ethnobotanical 

leaflet. 14: 616. 2010. Bruce, Food plants International. 

2014.  Ramachandran.  Adv.  Poll.  Spor.  Res.  30.  167. 

2014. Nayar et al. Fl. The Western Ghats, India, 1:674. 

2014.  Syzygium  arnottianum  Walp.,  Rep.  2:180.1843; 

Gamble,  Fl.  Pres.  Madras  475(338).  1919;  Mohanan 

&  Henry,  Fl.  Thiruvananthapuram  Dist.  187.  1994; 

Subram., Fl. Thenmala Division 134. 1995; Greller et al. 

J.  South  Asian  Nat.  Hist.  2(2).  165.1997;  Swarupandan 

et  al.  KFRI  Research  report  154.  30.  1998;  Menon  & 

Balasubramanyan., KFRI Research report 281. 28. 2006; 



Eugenia arnottiana (Walp.) Wight, Ic. t. 999. 1845; Hook. 

f., Fl. Brit. India 2: 483. 1878.

Large  canopy  trees,  above  15m  tall,  bark  surface 

blackish-grey, rough; branchlets terete. Leaves aromatic, 

simple,  opposite-decussate,  estipulate;  petiole  3–20 

mm  long,  slender,  grooved  above,  glabrous;  lamina 

3.5–9×1.8–3.7 cm, elliptic-lanceolate or elliptic-oblong, 

base  attenuate  or  acute,  apex  acuminate  or  caudate-

acuminate, margin entire, glabrous, glandular punctate, 

coriaceous,  olive-green  when  dry;  finely  dotted  on 

both  sides,  main  nerves  numerous,  parallel,  slightly 

ascending,  inconspicuous  on  both  sides,  secondary 

nerves numerous, closely parallel, looping at the margin, 

marginal nerve 0.1mm away from the margin.  Flowers 

bisexual,  white,  10–12  mm  long,  sessile,  in  dense 

clusters forming compact, terminal trichotomous cyme 

congested; calyx tube 5mm, turbinate; lobes 4; no thick 

disc;  petals  free,  deciduous;  stamens  many,  free,  bent 

inwards  at  the  middle  in  bud;  ovary  inferior,  2-celled, 

ovules  numerous;  style  1;  stigma  simple.  Fruits  berry, 

oblong-ovoid,  dark  purple,  fleshy,  single-seeded.  Stalk 

and pedicel stout and short. 

Vernacular  name:  Malayalam:  Ayuri,  Karayambuvu, 

Njaval,  Vellanjaval,  Ayura;  Tamil:  Kurunjaval,  Kuruthal, 

Kuruthamaram, Nagay, Naval, Pillanjaval.

Materials examined: MH Acc: No: 174906, 14.iv.2008, 

Naduvattam, coll. M. Mohanan & J.V. Sudhakar; MH Acc: 

No: 174905, 14.iv.2008, Naduvattam, coll. M. Mohanan 

&  J.V.  Sudhakar.  MH  Acc:  No:  174540,  9.iv.2008, 

Naduvattam, coll. M. Mohanan & J.V. Sudhakar; MH Acc: 

No: 174541, 9.iv.2008, coll. M. Mohanan& J.V. Sudhakar; 

GUH  206,  31.xii.2015,  Vattakkanal,  Kodaikanal, 

8

0



41’01.73”N  &  77

0

11’23.99”E,  coll.  Felix  Irudhyaraj 



&  Ramasubbu;  GUH  209,  25.iii.2015,  Agasthiyamalai 

10

0



12’29.60”N  &  77

0

28’50.32”E,  coll.  Manikandan 



&  Ramasubbu;  GUH  204,  19.iii.2016,  Megamalai, 

9

0



41’56.35”N  &  77

0

23’59.12”E.  coll.  Mohanraj  & 



Ramasubbu;  GUH  216,  18.iii.2016,  Vattakkanal, 

Kodaikanal,  8

0

41’01.73”N  &  77



0

11’23.  99”E,  coll.  Felix 

Irudhyaraj & Sasikala. 

Distribution  and  ecology:  It  is  a  native  tree  which 

grows  in  the  riparian/marshy  area  of  evergreen  forest 

at  higher  elevations  between  1,500–2,300  m  (Image 

1),  reported  from  Maharashtra,  Karnataka,  Kerala 

(Thiruvananthapuram,  Eravikulam,  Pathanamthitta, 

Kottayam,  Idukki,  Palakkad,  Kozhikode,  Kasargod)  and 

Tamil  Nadu  (Palni  Hills,  Aanamalai  and  Nilgiri  Hills 

(Vinodkumar 2003).

Economic  importance:  The  local  tribes  of  the 

Nilgiris  have  been  using  the  leaves  of  S.  densiflorum 

for  the  treatment  of  diabetes  mellitus  from  ancient 

times.  Clinical  investigators  working  in  India  have  also 

confirmed  the  effectiveness  of  S.  densiflorum  against 

diabetes mellitus.  Trace elements from this plant make 

a good daily supplement for people suffering from bone 

and anaemic disorders (Subramanian et al. 2012).  The 

oil  extracted  from  the  leaves  possesses  a  higher  anti-

oxidant capacity (Saranya et al. 2013).  It has potential 

phytochemical  compounds  such  as  tannin,  saponins, 

flavonoids,  alkaloids,  quinine,  cardiac  glycosides, 

terpenoids,  phenols  and  carbohydrates  (Nasrin  & 

Pandian 2015). 

Field status: The large number of mature individuals 

of  Syzygium  densiflorum  has  been  already  exploited 

from the Palni Hills only a very meager number of mature 



Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 September 2016 | 8(11): 9384–9390

9386

Syzygium species from southern Western Ghats 

Ramasubbu et al.

individuals  and  seedlings  exist.    The  mean  number  of 

mature  individuals  observed  at  different  shola  forests 

of Palni Hills was only 36±09.  S. densiflorum is closely 

associated  with  other  shola  arboreals  like  Eleocarpus 

recurvatus, E. variabilis, Rhododendron arboreum, 

Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, Litsea coriacea and  several 

Eucalyptus species.  The tree growing shola forests have 

regular phenoevents, but flowering is not observed as 

a regular event in most of the individuals of Syzygium 

densiflorum.    A  very  few  mature  individuals  only 

flowered once in two years and the period of flowering 

was also unpredictable.  However, a major percentage 

of  the  flowers  and  fruits  withered  away  prematurely.  

The  fruits  are  edible  and  also  the  food  source  for 

many  birds,  insects,  Malabar  Giant  Squirrel  and  Nilgiri 

Langur.  The shelf life of seeds has been observed to be 

a maximum of one year, but it is best to be sowed within 

4–6 m months.  Fresh fruits were brought to the nursery, 

depulped  manually,  dried  for  some  days  and  sown  in 

artificial beds (1×1 m plots) prepared in the forest land 

and  germination  was  noticed.    The  seeds  showed  a 

maximum 60% of germination and the least percentage 

(13%)  of  seedlings  alone  emerged  as  viable  seedlings.  

According  to  the  previous  literature  and  recent  field 

survey,  S.  densiflorum  is  distributed  in  selected  forest 

areas of the southern Western Ghats.  Due to the lack of 

updated information, the species being included under 

Vulnerable category by IUCN, and authenticated survey 

reports  have  to  be  communicated  to  IUCN  to  include 

under  the  endangered  category.    During  January–

March, five foliicolus fungi viz., Asterina sp., Lambosia 



hosagoudari,  Meliola syzygii-benthamiani,  Meliola 

densa,  Trichothyrium asterophorum  can  be  commonly 

seen on the most part of leaves.  The fungal infestation 

has also been retarding the growth and reproduction of 

the trees.



Syzygium myhendrae

(Bedd. ex Brandis) Gamble, Fl. Pres. Madras 478 (338). 

1919 [1: 338. 1957 (Repr.)]; V. Chitra in N.C. Nair & A.N. 

Henry (Eds), Fl. Tamilnadu Anal. 1: 157. 1983; Gopalan 

& Henry, End. Pl. India SW Ghats 398. 2000; Sasidh. et 

al. J. Econ. Tax. Bot. 26: 609. 2002. Sasidharan et al. KFRI 

research report. 282. 2006. Sasidh., Biod. Doc. Kerala pt. 

6, Fl. Pl.: 178. 2004; Nayar et al.  Fl.  Pl. Kerala-Handb.: 

451.  2006.  Nayar  et  al.  Fl.  Plant  of  Kerala.452.2006; 

Nayar et al. Fl. The Western Ghats, India, 1:677. 2014. 



Eugenia myhendrae Bedd. ex Brandis, Indian Trees 325. 

1906; Bourd., Forest Trees Travancore 189. 1908; Rama 

Rao, Fl. Pl. Travancore. 171. 1914.

Medium  sized  trees,  upto  12m  high,  bark  greyish 

pink;  branchlets  tetragonous.  Leaves  aromatic,  simple, 

opposite,  estipulate;  petiole  2–5  mm  long,  slender, 

glabrous;  lamina  3–7  x  2–2.5  cm,  oblanceolate  or 

obovate,  base  cuneate,  apex  obtusely  acuminate,  tip 

of acumen obtuse, margin entire, glabrous, coriaceous; 

lateral  nerves  many,  slender,  close,  parallel,  obscure, 

looped  at  the  margin  forming  intramarginal  nerves; 

intercostae  reticulate,  obscure.  Flowers;  petals  free, 

bisexual,  small,  white,  sessile  in  terminal  corymbose 

cymes  of  umbellules,  branches  of  inflorescence 

quadrangular; calyx tube 3mm, turbinate; lobes 4, round, 

petals  4,  caducous;  stamens  many,  regularly  folded  at 

middle in bud, 5mm long; ovary inferior, 2-celled, ovules 

many;  style  filiform,  shorter  than  the  stamens;  stigma 

simple,  acute.  Fruit  sessile,  7–8  mm  across,  globose, 

pink-purple, crowned by persistent calyx limb (Images 2 

& 3).

Materials  Examined:  GUH  231,  07.vi.2014,  Kardana 



Estate,  Megamalai,  9

0

30’–10



0

30’N  &  77

0

–78


0

30’E, 


coll.  Anjana  &  Ramasubbu;  GUH  211,  26.ii.2015, 

Agasthiyamalai,  10

0

12’29.60”N  &  77



0

28’50.32”E,  coll. 

Ramasubbu  &  Manikandan;  GUH  212,  19.iii.2016, 

Megamalai,  9

0

30’–11


0

32’N  &  77

0

–79


0

32’E,  coll. 

Ramasubbu  &  Mohanraj;  GUH  203,  28.vi.2015, 

Megamalai, 9

0

30’–10


0

30’N & 77

0

–78


0

30’E, coll. Divya & 

Ramasubbu;  GUH  219,  20.iii.2016,  Megamalai,  9

0

30’–



10

0

30’N & 77



0

–78


0

30’E, coll. Anjana & Felix Iruthyaraj.

Distribution  and  ecology:  Syzygium myhendrae is 

mainly distributed in Karnataka, Kerala (Idukki, Kollam, 

Thiruvananthapuram) and Tamil Nadu (Mutukuzhivayal, 

Tirunelveli)  (Shareef  &  Rasiya  2015).    Recently,  it  has 

been collected from the Megamalai Hills, Theni District, 

Tamil Nadu.

Phenology: Flowers in June and fruit set in September.

Image 1. Flowers of Syzygium densiflorum

© R. Ramasubbu


Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 September 2016 | 8(11): 9384–9390

9388

Syzygium species from southern Western Ghats 

Ramasubbu et al.

Pl. Alappuzha Dist. 333. 2000; Balasubramaniam et al. 

J. Econ. Tax. Bot. 29 (2): 382. 2005; Nayar et al. Fl. Plant 

of  Kerala.453.  2006;  Krishnakumar  &  Shenoy  J.  Econ. 

Taxon.  Bot.  30(4):  900.  2006;  Subash  et  al.  The  open 

Conservation Biology Journal. 2:1. 2008; Udhayavani et 

al. NeBIO. 4(5).68. 2013. Ramachandran. Adv. Poll. Spor. 

Res. 30: 167. 2014; Nayar et al. Fl. The Western Ghats, 

India, 1:674. 2014.

Medium  sized  to  large  trees,  upto  25m  high,  bark 

grayish brown; branchlets distinctly four angled, glabrous, 

longitudinally fissured, peeling off in thin irregular flakes, 

inner  bark  grey.    Leaves  simple,  opposite,  exstipulate, 

ovate to elliptic, lamina 10–17×5–10 cm, base narrowed 

and decurrent, apex bluntly acuminate, papery, hairless, 

obtuse, margin entire, chartaceous, shiny; lateral nerves 

10–15  pairs,  parallel,  distantly  arranged,  prominent, 

looped near the margin forming indistinct intramarginal 

nerve, intercostae reticulate, faint, joining near margin; 

petioles 2cm long.  Flower small, bisexual, about 3mm 

across, white, mildly fragrant, arranged in 8–15 cm long 

axillary corymbose cymes, 5–8 cm long, peduncle 4.5–8 

cm long, their branches also long, ascending; calyx tube 

short,  1mm  across,  lobes  4,  very  short;  no  thickened 

staminal  disc;  petals  white,  calyptrate;  stamens 

numerous,  free,  bent  inwards  at  middle  when  in  bud; 

ovary  inferior,  2-  celled,  ovules  many;  style  1;  stigma 

simple.  Fruit,  a  berry,  smooth,  hairless,  oblong-obtuse 

on both sides, 1x0.5 cm, deep violet, pericarp juicy; seed 

one, white (Image 4).

Vernacular 

name: 

Malayalam: 

Poriyal, 

Vathamkollimaram,  Kulirmavu,  Thenmavu;  Tamil: 

Kattunaval, Neernaval.

Materials examined: K000821398, 6.iii.1995, coll. T. F. 

Bourdillon; MH Acc No. 113361, 1.iii.1979, Sacred grove 

Kodumon, coll. C.N Mohanan; 113360, 1.iii.1979, Sacred 

grove Kodumon, coll. C.N. Mohanan; 113362, 4.iv.1980, 

sacred  grove  Kodumon,  coll.  C.N  Mohanan;  113363, 

4.iv.1980,  sacred  grove  Kodumon,  coll.  C.N.  Mohanan; 

113358,  4.iv.1980,  AickadAdoor,  coll.  C.N.  Mohanan; 

GUH  221,  18.vii.2015,  Keel  Nadugani,  11

0

27’181N  & 



76

0

22’451E,  coll.  Mohanraj  &  Manikandan;  GUH  226, 



25.iii.2016, Kalasamala, 10

0

40’27.8N & 76



0

5’27.1E, coll. 

Manikandan & Mohan; GUH 228, 08.iii.2016, Nadukani, 

11

0



28’183N  &  76

0

24’458E,  Felix  Iruthyaraj;  GUH  234, 



09.iii.2016,  Nadukani,  11

0

28’183N  &  76



0

24’458E,  coll. 

Mohanraj & Ramasubbu; GUH 227, 07.ii.2016, Palode, 

Thiruvananthapuram, coll. Ramasubbu & Mohanraj.

Distribution:  Syzygium travancoricum  distributed 

in  Kerala  (Thiruvananthapuram,  Pathanamthitta, 

Kollam,  Thrissur,  Kulathupuzha,  Wayanad  and  Idukki) 

and Tamil Nadu (Nadukani, Nilgiri Hills) and exclusively 

found  in  such  swampy  area  of  evergreen  forest  in 

higher  elevation  between  500–1,200  m  (Vinodkumar 

2003).  But most of the individuals are protected under 

Kalasamala  sacred  groves  at  Kerala  (Image  5).    These 

species also occur in Uttara Kannada, Kumaradhara river 

riparian forest (Karnataka). The dominated populations 

of  S. travancoricum  also  exist  in  Thirthahalli,  Shimoga 

District. 

Phenology: The flowering and fruiting period of the 

species  recorded  from  April–February.    However,  the 



Image 4. Flowering branch of Syzygium travancoricum

Image 5. Adult mature individual of S. travancoricum protected at 

Kalasa mala Kavu, Kerala

© R. Ramasubbu

© R. Ramasubbu

Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 September 2016 | 8(11): 9384–9390

9389

Syzygium species from southern Western Ghats 

Ramasubbu et al.

flowering and fruiting periods were not regular events 

and severe oscillations were observed during the study 

period.


Economic  importance:  Syzygium travancoricum is 

known  for  its  astringent,  bactericidal,  hypoglycemic, 

and  neuropsychopharmacological  effects  and  for  their 

significant odors (Jirovetz et al. 2001; Radha et al. 2002).  

The antimicrobial activity of essential oil was found to 

be  more  effective  on  yeasts  than  on  bacteria.  It  has 

some major compounds such as trans β-ocemene, trans 

β-aryophyllene, α-humulene  and  α-farnesene (Shafi  et 

al. 2002).

Field status: Bourdillon collected the species in March 

1895 in Swampy places of Travancore, Kerala and it was 

described by Gamble in 1981.  The tree was said to be 

extinct once, but it was rediscovered by Krishnakumar 

& Shenoy (2006) from the forests of Dakshina Kannada, 

mainly  Netravathi  basin.    Recently  this  species  has 

been  included  in  the  Flora  of  Tamil  Nadu  (Thomas  & 

Ramachandran  (2014).    In  Kerala,  very  few  individuals 

have been reported from a sacred grove at Kundumon 

and Aikad of Quilon (Nair & Mohanan 1981).

According to the IUCN list, this tree is considered as 

critically endangered and grows partially in the interior 

area  of  Kumaradhara.    These  species  are  associated 

with  some  endangered  species  such  as  Hopea ponga

Veteria indica  and  some  vulnerable  species  such  as 

Ochreinauclea missionis and Gymnacranthera canarica 

(Ramachandran et al. 2013).

Several  factors  are  responsible  for  the  reduction 

of  the  population  of  these  tree  species  in  the  natural 

habitats. Some insects such as Bracon fletcheri Silvestri 

and Ophiorrhabad sp. are reported as major infestation 

agent on fruits of S. travancoricum which is the major 

casual  factor  affecting  natural  regeneration  of  the 

species  (Hussain  &  Anilkumar  2015).    The  seed  pest 

incidence,  therefore,  is  responsible  and  predicts  the 

endangerment  of  the  species  in  the  near  future  and 

warrants conservation measures for posterity.

Further,  in  vitro  seed  germination  confirms  its 

viability upto 76% and healthy seedlings were developed 

at mist house, GRI.  A plant tissue culture technique has 

been adapted to propagate in large number.  Very few 

explants responded and the research work in progress.  

Saplings of S. travancoricum were established through 

vegetative cuttings of roots and stems. 

Syzygium  densiflorum,  S. myhendrae and S. 

travancoricum  face  severe  problems  due  to  low  seed 

viability,  the  incursion  of  exotic  trees  into  the  forest 

area,  an  extension  of  agricultural  land,  illegal  timber 

trading,  forest  degradation  and  depletion  by  human 

invasion.  It has a direct effect on the reduction of this 

tree  population  in  the  natural  habitat.    Their  rarity 

in  the  Western  Ghats  indicates  thinner  population 

status and therefore warrants immediate action for its 

conservation  and  restoration.    A  proper  conservation 

measure has to be taken for their effective conservation 

and regeneration. 

References 

Ayoola, G.A., F.M. Lawore, T. Adelowotan, I.E. Aibinu, E. Adenipekun, 

H.A.B. Coker & T.O. Odugbemi (2008).  Chemical  analysis  and 

antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Syzygium aromaticum 

(Clove) African Journal of Microbiology Research 2: 162–166.

Bourdillon, T.F. (1908). The Forest Trees of Travancore. The Government 

Press, Trivandrum, India, 189pp.



Brandis,  D.  (1906).  Indian Trees:  An Account of Trees, Shrubs and 

Woody Climbers, Bamboos and Palms Indigenous or Commonly 

Cultivated in the British Indian Empire. Archibald Constable & Co. 

Ltd., London, 325pp.



Chaudhuri,  A.K.N.,  S.  Pal,  A.  Gomes  &  S.  Bhattacharya  (1990). 

Anti-inflammatory  and  related  actions  of  Syzygium  cuminii  seed 

extract. Phytotherapy Research 4: 5–10; 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/

ptr.2650040103 

Gamble, J.S. (1981).Flora of the Presidency of Madras - Vol. 1. Adlard 

& Sons Ltd., 21, Hart Street W.O., London, 475pp.



Hussain, A. & C. Anilkumar (2015). New records of two seed insect 

pest,  Bracon  fletcheri  Silvestri  and  Ophiorrhabad  sp.  in  Syzygium 



travancoricum Gamble. A critically endangered tree of the southern 

Western Ghats. Indian Forester 141(6): 293–696.



Jirovetz, L., G. Buchbauer, P.M. Shafi, M.K. Rosamma & M. Geissler 

(2001).  Analysis  of  the  composition  and  aroma  of  the  essential 

leaf oil of Syzygium travancoricum from south India by GC-MS and 

Olfactometry.  Seasonal  changes  of  composition.  Chromatographa 

53: 372–374; 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02490359

Kumar,  A.,  R.  Ilavarasan,  T.  Jayachandran,  M.  Deecaraman,  P. 

Aravindan, N. Padmanabhan & M.R.V. Krishan (2008). Anti-diabetic 

activity  of  Syzygium cumini  and  its  isolated  compound  against 

streptozotocin-induced  diabetic  rats.  Journal of Medicinal Plants 

Research 2: 246–249.

Manickam, V.S., C. Murugan & G.J. Jothi (2008). Flora of Tirunelveli 

Hills(Southern Western Ghats) - Vol. 1 - Polypetalae. Bishen Singh 

Mahendra Pal Singh, Dehradun, 66pp.



Mohanan,  M.  &  A.N.  Henry  (1994).  Flora of Thiruvananthapuram

Botanical Survey of India, Calcutta.



Nasrin, S.B. & R. Pandian (2015). Qualitative and quantitative analysis 

of medical trees belonging to Myrtaceae family. Proceedings of 31



st

 

IRF International conference, Pune, India, 54–59pp.

Muruganandan,  S.,  K.  Srinivasan,  S.S.  Chandra,  S.  K.  Tandan,  J.  Lal 

&  V.  Raviprakash  (2001).  Anti-inflammatory  activity  of  Syzygium 

cumini  Bark.  Fitoterapia  72:  369–375; 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/

S0367-326X(00)00325-7

Nair,  N.C.  &  C.N.  Mohanan  (1981).  On  the  rediscovery  of  four 

threatened  species  from  the  sacred  groves  of  Kerala.  Journal of 



Economic and Taxonomic Botany 2: 233–235.

Nassar, M.I., A.H.Gaara, A.H.E.Ghorab, A.R.H. Farrag, H. Shen, E.Huq 

& T.J. Mabry (2007). Chemical  constituents  of  clove  (Syzygium 

aromaticum, Fam. Myrtaceae) and their antioxidant activity. Revista 

Latinoamericana de Quimica 35: 47–57.

Nonaka, G., Y.Aiko, K. Aritake & I. Nishioka (1992). Tannins and related 

compounds. CXIX: Samarangenins A and B, novel proanthocyanidins 

with  doubly  bonded  structures, from Syzygium samarangens and 

Syzygium aqueumChemical and Pharmaceutical Bulletin 40: 2671–

2673.


Park, M.J., K.S. Gwak, I. Yang, W. S. Choi, H.J. Jo & J.W. Chang (2007). 

Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 September 2016 | 8(11): 9384–9390

9390

Syzygium species from southern Western Ghats 

Ramasubbu et al.

Antifungal  activities  of  the  essential  oils  of  Syzygium  aromaticum 

(L.)  Mer.  et  Perry  and  Leptospermum  petersonii  Bailey  and  their 

constituents against various dermatophytes. Journal of Microbiology 

45: 460–465.

Radha, R., R. Latha & M.S. Swaminathan (2002). Chemical composition 

and  bioactivity  of  essential  oil  from  Syzygium travancoricum 

Gamble. Flavour and Fragrance Journal 17: 352–354.

Raju,  A.J.S.,  J.R.  Krishnan  &  P.H.  Chandra  (2014).  Reproductive 

ecology  of  Syzygium alternifolium  (Myrtaceae),  An  endemic  and 

endangered  tropical  tree  species  in  Southern  Eastern  Ghats  of 

India.  Journal of Threatened Taxa  6(9):  6153–6171;

  http://dx.doi.

org/10.11609/JoTT.o3768.6153-71



Ramachandra,  T.V.,  M.D.S.  Chandran,  H.S.P.  Shenoy,  G.R.Rao,  S. 

Vinay, M. Vishnu & N. Sreekanth (2013). Kumaradhara river basin, 

Karnataka Western Ghats: Need for conservation and Sustainable 

use. ENVIS Technical Report, 54pp.

Reen-Yen  Kuo,  K.  Qian,  S.L.  Morris-Natschke  &  K.-H.  Lee  (2006). 

Plant-derived  triterpenoids  and  analogues  as  antitumor  and  anti-

HIV agents. Natural Product Reports 26: 1321–1344; 

http://dx.doi.

org/10.1039/b810774m

Rekha, N., R. Balaji & M. Deecaraman (2010). Antihyperglycemic and 

antihyperlipidemic effects of extracts of the pulp of Syzygium cumini 

and  bark  of  Cinnamon zeylanicum  in  strepto-  zotocin-induced 

diabetic rats. Journal of Applied Bioscience 28: 1718–1730.



Krishnakumar,  G.  &  H.  S.  Shenoy  (2006).  Syzygium travancoricum 

(Gamble)  (Myrtaceae)  -  a  new  record  to  Karnataka.  Journal of 



Economic and Taxonomic Botany 30(4): 900–902.

Saranya J., P. Eganathan & P. Sujanapal (2013). Influence of altitudinal 

variation  on  the  antioxidant  capacity  of  essential  oil  of  Syzygium 



densiflorum  from  southern  Western  Ghats,  India.  International 

Journal of Green Pharmacy 7: 287–300.

Sasidharan, N., P. Sujanapal & J. Augustine (2002). Reappearance of 

Syzygium myhendrae (Bedd.  ex  Brandis)  Gamble  and  Ellipanthus 

tomentosus  Kurz  in  the  southern  Western  Ghats.  Journal of 

Economic and Taxonomic Botany 26: 609–611.

Shafi, P.M., M.K. Rosamma, J. Kaisar & P.S. Reddy (2002). Antibacterial 

activity  of  Syzygium cumini  and  Syzygium travancoricum  leaf 

essential oils. Fitoterapia 73: 414–416.

Shareef,  S.M.  &  A.B.  Rasiya  (2015).  Lectotypification  and  status  of 

Syzygium myhendrae (Bedd. ex Brandis) Gamble (Myrtaceae) - an 

endemic myrtle of southern Western Ghats, India. Taiwania 60(1): 

59‒62.

Shyamala  G.S.  &  K.  Vasantha  (2010).  Phytochemical  screening  and 

antibacterial  activity  of  Syzygium cumini  (L.)  (Myrtaceae)  leaves 

extracts.  International  Journal  of  PharmTech  Research  2:  1569–

1573.


Subramanian, R., P. Subbramaniyan & V. Raj (2012). Determination of 

some minerals and trace elements in two tropical medicinal plants. 



Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine 555–558.

Thomas,  B.  &  V.S.  Ramachandran  (2014).  Additions  to  the  Flora  of 

Tamil Nadu, southern India. The Journal of Biodiversity Photon 113: 

355–359.

Vinodkumar, T.G. (2003). Systematic Studies of the Family Myrtaceae 

in  Kerala.  PhD  Thesis,  Department  of  Botany,  Mahatma  Gandhi 

University, Kottayam, Kerala.

Threatened Taxa


All articles published in the Journal of Threatened Taxa are registered under Cre-

ative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License unless otherwise mentioned. 

JoTT allows unrestricted use of articles in any medium, reproduction and distribution 

by providing adequate credit to the authors and the source of publication.



September 2016 | Vol. 8 | No. 11 | Pages: 9289–9396

Date of Publication: 26 September 2016 (Online & Print)

DOI: 10.11609/jott.2016.8.11.9289-9396

www.threatenedtaxa.org



ISSN 0974-7907 (Online); ISSN 0974-7893 (Print)

OPEN ACCESS

Threatened Taxa

Review 

Distribution records and extended range of the Sri Lanka Frogmouth 

Batrachostomus moniliger (Aves: Caprimulgiformes: Podargidae) in 

the Western Ghats: a review from 1862 to 2015

-- Anil Mahabal, Sanjay Thakur & Rajgopal Patil, Pp. 9289–9305 



Short Communications

Small carnivores of Parambikulam Tiger Reserve, southern Western 

Ghats, India

-- R. Sreehari & P.O. Nameer, Pp. 9306–9315



First record of the Diadem Leaf-Nosed Bat Hipposideros diadema 

(E. Geoffroy, 1813) (Chiroptera: Hipposideridae) from the Andaman 

Islands, India with the possible occurrence of a hitherto unreported 

subspecies

-- Bhargavi Srinivasulu, Aditya Srinivasulu, Chelmala Srinivasulu, 

Tauseef Hamid Dar, Asad Gopi & Gareth Jones, Pp. 9316–9321

New distribution records of Mesoclemmys vanderhaegei 

(Testudines: Chelidae) from southeastern Brazil, including 

observations on reproduction

-- Fábio Maffei, Bruno Tayar Marinho do Nascimento, Guilherme 

Marson Moya & Reginaldo José Donatelli, Pp. 9322–9326

Spiders (Arachnida: Araneae) of Gujarat University Campus, 

Ahmedabad, India with additional description of Eilica tikaderi 

(Platnick, 1976) 

-- Dhruv A. Prajapati, Krunal R. Patel, Sandeep B. Munjpara, Shiva S. 

Chettiar & Devendrasinh D. Jhala, Pp. 9327–9333

New records of Termite species from Kerala (Isoptera: Termitidae) 

-- Poovoli Amina, K. Rajmohana, K.V. Bhavana & P.P. Rabeeha, 

Pp. 9334–9338

Odonata (Insecta) diversity of southern Gujarat, India

-- Darshana M. Rathod, B.M. Parasharya & S.S. Talmale, Pp. 9339–

9349

An update on the distribution pattern and endemicity of three 

lesser-known tree species in the Western Ghats, India

-- K. Sankara Rao, N.V. Page, A.N. Sringeswara, R. Arun Singh & 

Imran Baig, Pp. 9350–9355

Heavy metal distribution in mangrove sediment cores from selected 

sites along western coast of India 

-- P. Vidya & Rajashekhar K. Patil, Pp. 9356–9364



Notes

New distribution record of the Bhutan Takin Budorcas taxicolor 

whitei Hodgson, 1850 (Cetartiodactyla: Bovidae) in Bhutan

-- Tashi Dhendup, Tshering Tempa, Tsethup Tshering & Nawang 

Norbu, Pp. 9365–9366

Recent records and distribution of the Indian Brown Mongoose 

Herpestes fuscus Gray, 1837 (Mammalia: Carnivora: Herpestidae) 

from the southern Western Ghats, India

-- R. Sreehari, Sandeep Das, M. Gnanakumar, K.P. Rajkumar, 

K.A. Sreejith, Navaneeth Kishor, Dhaneesh Bhaskar, P.S. Easa & 

P.O. Nameer, Pp. 9367–9370



First record of Dobson’s Long-tongued Fruit Bat Eonycteris spelaea 

(Dobson, 1871) (Mammalia: Chiroptera: Pteropodidae) from Kerala, 

India

-- P.O. Nameer, R. Ashmi, Sachin K. Aravind & R. Sreehari, Pp. 9371–

9374

Road kills of the endemic snake Perrotet’s Shieldtail Plectrurus 

perrotetii, Dumeril, 1851 (Reptilia: Squamata: Uropeltidae) in 

Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu, India

-- P. Santhoshkumar, P. Kannan, B. Ramakrishnan, A. Veeramani, 

A. Samson, S. Karthick, J. Leonaprincy, B. Nisha, N. Dineshkumar, 

A. Abinesh, U. Vigneshkumar & P. Girikaran, Pp. 9375–9376



Reappearance of the rare Shingle Urchin Colobocentrotus 

(Podophora) atratus (Camarodonta: Echinometridae) after eight 

decades from the rocky shore of Kodiyaghat (Port Blair), South 

Andaman Islands, India

-- Vikas Pandey & T. Ganesh, Pp. 9377–9380



Sallywalkerana

, a replacement name for Walkerana Dahanukar et al. 

2016 (Anura: Ranixalidae)

-- Neelesh Dahanukar, Nikhil Modak, Keerthi Krutha, P.O. Nameer, 

Anand D. Padhye & Sanjay Molur, P. 9381

A sighting of Plastingia naga (de Nicéville, [1884]) (Lepidoptera: 

Hesperiidae: Hesperiinae) from central Assam, India

-- Gaurab Nandi Das, Arajush Payra & Bitupan Boruah, Pp. 9382–9383



A note on the taxonomy, field status and threats to three endemic 

species of Syzygium (Myrtaceae) from the southern Western Ghats, 

India

-- R. Ramasubbu, C. Divya & S. Anjana, Pp. 9384–9390



Arnebia nandadeviensis Sekar & Rawal (Boraginaceae) a new 

synonym of Onosma bracteata Wall. 

-- Umeshkumar L. Tiwari, Pp. 9391–9393



Exosporium monanthotaxis Piroz. (Fungi: Ascomycota: 

Pezizomycotina) from Biligirirangan Hills, southern India 

-- Rashmi Dubey & Shreya Sengupta, Pp. 9394–9396





Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə