M. Sh. Khubutiya, M. L. Rogal', E. A. Tarabrin, A. N. Smolyar, A. M. Kuz'min, S. G. Gyulasaryan



Yüklə 55.94 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix13.12.2016
ölçüsü55.94 Kb.

 



Transplantologiya - 2016. - № 1. - P. 25-28.

 

 

Acute complicated calculous cholecystitis  

after bilateral lung transplantation

 

M.Sh. Khubutiya, M.L. Rogal', E.A. Tarabrin, A.N. Smolyar,  



A.M. Kuz'min, S.G. Gyulasaryan 

N.V. Sklifosovsky Research Institute for Emergency Medicine of Moscow 

Healthcare Department, Moscow, Russia

 

Contact: Aleksey M. Kuz'min, 



wolverine88@bk.ru

 

 



The  paper  describes  a  case  of  successful  treatment  of  acute 

destructive calculous cholecystitis after bilateral lung transplantation.

 

Keywords:  acute  calculous  cholecystitis,  lung  transplantation, 

surgical treatment

 

 



Lung  transplantation  is  the  only  option  to  treat  the  end-stage  chronic 

obstructive  pulmonary  disease  (including  bronchiectasis),  idiopathic 

pulmonary  fibrosis,  cystic  fibrosis,  and  pulmonary  hypertension.  An 

increased  bile  lithogenicity  in  combination  with  drug  immunosuppression 

therapy  after  transplantation  raise  the  risk  of  biliary  complications  [1]. 

Abdominal  surgical  complications  occur  in  28%  of  patients  after  heart 

transplantation or combined heart-lung transplantation [2], and in 10% after 

lung 


transplantation 

[3]. 


Abdominal 

diseases 

in 

patients 



on 

immunosuppressive, anti-bacterial, and anti-viral therapies are characterized 

by  atypical  course  with  "vague"  clinical  pattern  and  severe  complications 

[4]. Most investigators [5] believe that preventive cleansing of biliary tree is 

not indicated in the patients on the waiting list for kidney transplantation or 

those after transplantation. There is no standardized tactics for cholelithiasis 



 

treatment  in  patients  with  the  end-stage  heart  disease,  and  those  after  heart 



transplant. Three mutually exclusive points of view  still exist: to perform a 

planned laparoscopic cholecystectomy before heart transplantation [6], after 

it  [7],  or  at  the  onset  of  clinical  symptoms  of  cholelithiasis  complications, 

including  such  as  hepatic  colic,  acute  cholecystitis,  and  biliary  pancreatitis 

[8].  Elective  cholecystectomy  is  well  tolerated  by  the  patients  after  heart 

transplantation  [9], the  laparoscopic  approach  being  the preferred  one  [10]. 

There are only few reports in literature on the treatment of cholelithiasis and 

its complications after lung transplantation [1, 3, 10]. Therefore, we believe 

it appropriate to present a clinical case report from our experience.

 

Patient  T.,  44  years  old  (medical  record  #2376814),  was  referred  to 



the N.V.Sklifosovsky Institute for Emergency Medicine on 18.09.2014 with 

complaints on an occasionally occurring moderate epigastric pain, the body 

temperature elevation up to 38° C once in 3 days.

 

From the previous history we revealed that on December 5, 2013, the 



patient  underwent  bilateral  lung  transplantation  for  severe  bronchiectasis 

lung  disease  with  chronic  respiratory  failure,  the  transplantation  was 

performed  in  the  N.V.Sklifosovsky  Institute  for  Emergency  Medicine.  The 

postoperative  period  was  without  major  complications,  and  on  the  18

th

  day 


after  surgery,  the  patient  was  discharged  home  to  be  followed-up  by  a 

pulmonologist  at  the  local  clinic  on  residence.  Gallstone  disease  and 

cholecystolithiasis had been first diagnosed by ultrasonography several years 

before  lung  transplantation.  There  were  no  clinical  symptoms  of  gallstone 

disease. 

 

After  lung  transplantation,  the  patient  was  on  immunosuppressive 



therapy (Prograf, 3 mg/day; methylprednisolone, 16 mg/day; mycophenolate 

mofetil, 2000 mg/day), received antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal drugs 



 

(azithromycin,  750  mg/week;  co-trimoxazole,  960  mg/day;  valganciclovir, 



900 mg/day; voriconazole, 400 mg/day).

 

In July 2014, the patient reported  an episode of moderate pain in the 



epigastric area that was controlled by a single dose of No-Spa. There was no 

nausea,  vomiting,  or  fever.  In  August  2014,  the  pain  attack  repeated,  the 

patient had occasional rises in the body temperature up to 38° C (once every 

3  days).  The  patient  was  evaluated  at  an  out-patient  setting,  the  physical 

examination 

included 

abdominal 

and 


kidney 

ultrasonography, 

esophagogastroduodenoscopy.  The  surgeon's  and  gastroenterologist's 

examination did not reveal any acute abdominal  surgical diseases. It should 

be  emphasized  that  hematology  and  biochemistry  blood  tests  gave  normal 

results  with  one  exception  (hemoglobin  96  g/L)  suggesting  moderate 

anemia.

 

On September 9, the patient was hospitalized with persisting fever to a 



local  public  hospital  for  further  observation.  Ultrasonography  revealed  the 

signs of acute phlegmonous calculous cholecystitis, and perivesical abscess. 

On  September  18,  2014,  the  patient  was  transferred  to  the  Department  of 

Urgent Hepato-Biliary Surgery of the N.V.Sklifosovsky Institute.

 

The  patient  was  examined  on  admission.  Ultrasonography  revealed 



the  signs  of  infiltration  in  the  right  subhepatic  space  involving 

mesogastrium,  acute  calculous  gangrenous-perforating  cholecystitis, 

perivesical  abscess.  On  the  day  of  admission  the  patient  underwent  a 

percutaneous  transhepatic  microcholecystostomy  and  a  percutaneous 

transhepatic  drainage  of  the  perivesical  abscess  under  ultrasonographic 

guidance using a single-staged method with Pigtail 9Fr drainage system; the 

procedures  being  performed  under  local  anesthesia.  The  drainage  system 

evacuated 50  ml  of  purulent  discharge  from  the  gallbladder,  and 100  ml  of 



 

similar  purulent  discharge  from  the  abscess  cavity;  the  microbiology  study 



of  pus  showed  Klebsiella  pneumonia  with  a  titer  of  10

7

,  sensitive  to 



imipenem.

 

Fistulography  (see  Fig.)  demonstrated  the  signs  of  a  gall  bladder 



internal  fistula  with  communication  to  the  right  curvature  of  the  colon 

through  the  abscess  cavity,  calculous  cholecystitis,  timely  entering  of  the 

contrast agent to the duodenum, no evidence of choledocholithiasis. 

 

 



 

 



 

 

B



 

Fig. Fistulography:

 

A – Gall bladder;



 

B – Perivesical abscess

 

 

The abscess drain was replaced by a larger-bore tube (30 Fr) in a step-



wise  fashion,  the  antibiotic  therapy  was  continued  (imipenem,  1000 

mg/day),  as  were  the  detoxification  therapy,  the  fractional  lavage  of  the 

abscess cavity and the gall bladder.

 

The patient's condition improved, the pyo-intoxication symptoms were 



controlled, however, that did not result in the abscess cavity reduction, nor in 

the fistula cure. The patient's perivesical infiltrate also persisted involving a 



 

hepatic  flexure  of  the  colon  that  made  the  differentiation  of  organ  walls 



hardly  possible.  The case  was discussed  at  the  concilium  of  specialists  that 

made the following decisions: 1. To operate the patient using the laparotomy 

approach. 2. To make the resection outside the infiltrative focus in order to 

avoid  the  dissemination  of  the  purulent  process.  According  to  the  decision 

taken  at  the  concilium,  on  October  22,  2014,  the  patient  was  operated  on. 

Using endotracheal anesthesia, we performed laparotomy, cholecystectomy, 

and  right  hemicolectomy  with  "end-to-side"  ileotransverse  colon 

anastomosis. Samples of the colon, the small intestine, and the gall bladder 

were  sent  to  histological  examination  that  gave  the  following  results:  "the 

wall  of  the  gallbladder  having  multiple  sclerosis  across  all  layers,  edema, 

diffused  and  focal  lymphocyte  infiltration  with  a  moderate  admixture  of 

plasma  cells,  macrophages,  and  few  granulocytes  outside  the  abscess,  the 

sclerosis  and  inflammatory  infiltration  in  the  adjacent  area  being  more 

pronounced;  the  infiltration  contains  large  numbers  of  granulocytes.  The 

walls  of  both  abscesses  contain  fibrous  tissue,  the  lumen  is  laid  with 

amorphous  acellular masses, pyo-necrotic  detritus;  there is the  colonization 

of  the  fungus  mycelium.  Inflammation  affects  the  wall  of  the  colon  from 

outside;  the  small  and  large  intestine,  and  the  appendix  wall  outside  the 

abscess  wall  are  without  inflammatory  abnormalities.  Findings  in  the 

external  intestinal  wall  in  the  fistula  area  are  typical  of  the  abscess  wall 

pattern;  the  mucosal  damage  is  secondary,  of  short-term  standing.  There  is 

chronic  calculous  cholecystitis  in  exacerbation.  Pericystic  and  intercellular 

abscesses  contain  fungus  mycelium  colonization,  drained  into  the  colonic 

lumen".  After  surgery,  the  patient  continued  antimicrobial  (Meronem,  3 

g/day) and immunosuppressive therapy. The early postoperative period was 

uneventful.

 


 

At  day  7  after  surgery,  the  patient  developed  the  signs  of  systemic 



inflammatory  response  with  fever  up  to  39°  C,  leukocytosis  14x10

9

/L  with 



the  shift  to  myelocytes  (7%)  in  the  white  blood  cell  differential  count.  At 

examination,  no  findings  of  intra-abdominal  pyo-septic  inflammation  were 

seen.  A  superficial  suppuration  of  the  laparotomy  wound  was  found.  The 

skin  sutures  were  removed  and  the  topical  treatment  was  initiated. 

Microbiological  study  of  wound  discharge  revealed  Klebsiella  pneumonia

The wound gradually cleared itself; "sluggish" granulations appeared.

 

However,  the  patient's  hyperthermia  still  persisted.  Ultrasonography 



revealed localized  fluid collections in the  anterior  abdominal wall  and  both 

gluteal  areas.  At  day  20  after  surgery,  the  abscesses  of  the  anterior 

abdominal wall, and both gluteal areas were incised and evacuated yielding 

30, 80, and 60  ml of thick yellow-greenish pus, respectively. Microbiology 

study  of  the  abscess  contents  detected  Klebsiella  pneumonia.  No  flora 

growth  was  found  in  blood  cultures.  A  systemic  antibiotic  therapy  with 

sulperason  (4  g/day)  was  initiated  to  control  the  dissemination  of  purulent 

process. The topical therapy was continued. The intoxication was gradually 

controlled,  purulent  cavities  cleared  themselves  and  healed  by  secondary 

intention. 

 

Further  postoperative  course  was  complicated  by  a  right  lower  lobe 



pleuropneumonia.  The  antibacterial  therapy  was  supplemented  with 

meropenem  (2  g/day), tigacil  (100  mg/day);  the patient  received  the  course 

of  antifungal  therapy  with  Vfend  (400  mg/day),  and  inhalations  with 

colistin,  and  amphotericin  B.  The  microbiology  of  sputum  and  bronchial 

washings showed no abnormal flora.

 

The  patient  was  discharged  from  hospital  in  a  satisfactory  condition 



for outpatient follow-up care on the 92

nd

 day from hospital admission.



 

 

 



Conclusion

 

Due  to  a  mandatory  immunosuppressive  therapy,  the  patient  had  a 



non-typical  course  of  acute  calculous  cholecystitis.  Mild  to  moderate  pain 

and occasional rises in the body temperature hampered a timely diagnosis of 

gallstone  disease  complications.  Immunosuppression  led  to  multiple 

infection  complications  with  the  pathogen  non-typical  for  abdominal 

surgery, and all those delayed the healing process. The  authors believe that 

the  described  clinical  case  report  serves  an  evidence  in  favour  of  planned 

cleansing measures for chronic surgical diseases in patients undergoing lung 

transplantation.

 

 

R e f e r e n c e s  



1.  Gupta  D.,  Sakorafas  G.H.,  McGregor  C.G.,  et  al.  Management  of 

biliary tract disease in heart and lung transplant patients. Surgery. 2000; 128 

(4): 641–649. 

2.  Steed  D.L.,  Brown  B.,  Reilly  J.J.,  et  al.  General  surgical 

complications in heart and heart­lung transplantation. Surgery. 1985; 98 (4): 

739–745. 

3.  Hoekstra  H.J.,  Hawkins  K.,  de  Boer  W.J.,  et  al.  Gastrointestinal 

complications in lung transplant survivors that require surgical intervention. 



Br J Surg. 2001; 88 (3): 433–438. 

4.  Kleyza  V.Yu.,  Narbutas  P.V.,  Kaluyna  G.A.,  Daynis  B.E. 

Oslozhneniya  so  storony  organov  pishchevareniya  posle  transplantatsii 

pochki  [Complications  from  the  digestive  organs  after  kidney 

transplantation]. Khirurgiya. 1982; 4: 88–90. (In Russian). 


 

5.  Melvin  W.S.,  Meier  D.J.,  Elkhammas  E.A.,  et  al.  Prophylactic 



cholecystectomy is not indicated following renal transplantation. Am J Surg. 

1998; 175 (4): 317–319. 

6.  Carroll  B.J.,  Chandra  M.,  Phillips  E.H.,  Harold  J.G.  Laparoscopic 

cholecystectomy in the heart transplant candidate with acute cholecystitis. 



Heart Lung Transplant. 1992; 11: 831–833. 

7.  Delorio  T.,  Thompson  A.,  Larson  G.M.,  et  al.  Laparoscopic 

cholecystectomy in transplant patients. Surg Endosc. 1993; 7 (5): 404–407. 

8.  Kazakov  E.N.,  Saitgareev  R.Sh.,  Shumakov  D.V.,  et  al. 

Transplantatsiya  serdtsa  v  FGU  «FNC  transplantologii  i  iskusstvennykh 

organov  imeni  akademika  V.I.  Shumakova»  [Heart  transplantation  in  FSI 

«V.I. Shumakov Federal Research Center of Transplantology and Artificial 

Organs  »].  In:  S.V.  Gautier,  ed.  Tezisy  dokl.  V  Vseros.  s"ezda 

transplantologov,  g.  Moskva,  8–10  oktyabrya  2010  g.  [Abstracts  of  the  V 

All­Russian Congress of the Transplantation, Moscow, October 8–10, 2012]. 



Vestnik transplantologii i iskusstvennykh organov. 2010; XII (Supple): 154–

155. (In Russian). 

9.  Takeyama  H.,  Sinanan  M.N.,  Fishbein  D.P.,  et  al.  Expectant 

management  is  safe  for  cholelithiasis  after  heart  transplant.  J  Heart  Lung 



Transplant. 2006; 25 (5): 539–543. 

10.  Courcoulas  A.P.,  Kelly  E.,  Harbrecht  B.G.  Laparoscopic 

cholecystectomy  in  the  transplant  population.  Surg  Endosc.  1996;  10  (5): 

516–519. 

11.  Pakhomov  V.I.,  Vasina  T.A.,  L'vitsina  G.M.  Lechenie  gnoynykh 

ran na fone immunodepressivnoy terapii u bol'nykh posle allotransplantatsii 

pochki  [Treatment  of  purulent  wounds  on  immunosuppressive  therapy  in 

patients after renal allograft]. Khirurgiya. 1977; 1: 23–28. (In Russian). 



 

12. Sutariya V., Tank A. An audit of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in 



renal transplant patients. Ann Med Health Sci Res. 2014; 4 (1): 48–50. 

13. Peterseim D.S., Pappas T.N., Meyers C.H., et al. Management of 

biliary  complications  after  heart  transplantation.  J  Heart  Lung  Transplant. 

1995; 14 (4): 623–631. 



 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə