Meeting Eleven of the Myrtle Rust Transition to Management Group



Yüklə 82.1 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü82.1 Kb.

 

Minutes  

 

 

 

 



Page 1 of 11

 

Meeting Eleven of the Myrtle Rust Transition to Management Group 

 

 



Teleconference held on Tuesday 19 February, 2013 

 

Attendees: Colin Grant, DAFF (Chair); Louise Clarke, DAFF; Melissa Hart, DAFF; David Forsyth, 

DSEWPaC; Alex Blanden, DSEWPaC; Greg Fraser, PHA; Rod Turner, PHA; Jenna Taylor, PHA 

(Secretariat); Geoff Pegg, DAFF Queensland; Satendra Kumar, NSW DPI; Graham Wilson, OEH; Pat 

Sharkey, DPI Vic; Russell McMurray, DPI Vic; Stuart Holland, DPI Vic; Lucy Sutherland, ASBP; Gavin 

Matthew, AFPA. 

 

Apologies: Vanessa Findlay, DAFF; Andrew Wilson, DAFF; Rose Hockham, DAFF; Nin Hyne, DAFF; 

Belinda Brown, DEWHA; Suzy Perry, DAFF Queensland; Jim Thompson, DAFF Queensland; Mark 

Panitz, DAFF Queensland; Gordon Guymer, DSITIA; Bruce Christie, NSW DPI; Kathy Gott, NSW DPI; 

Anne Dennis, DSE; Hugh Bramwells, DSE; Andrew Greenwood, DSE; Shaun Suitor, DSE; Peter Grist, 

AFPA. 

 

Item 1 – Welcome by the Chair 



 

Colin Grant welcomed all Members of the Myrtle Rust Transition to Management Group (MRTMG). 

 

Item 2 – Endorsement of Minutes from the Previous Meeting 

 

It was discussed that the draft minutes from Meeting Ten had been circulated for comment out of 



session. No comments or amendment requests had been received and the minutes were taken to be 

endorsed. They have been made available on the Myrtle Rust Transition to Management Program 

website. 

 

Item 3 – Action Items from the Previous Meeting 

 

Colin Grant ran through the action list from Meeting Ten and the status of each action item was 



discussed. 

 

Item 4 – Report from PHA 

 

Contracts 

 

Rodney Turner reminded Members that all but one of the contracts for the Australian Government 



funded projects in the Plan for Transition to Management of Myrtle Rust have been signed and the 

researchers are actively undertaking work. 

 

Since the last meeting, PHA has received three progress reports from researchers. These have been 



circulated to the MRTMG for their information. They have also been circulated to the members of the 

Myrtle Rust Scientific Advisory Group (MRSAG) who have been invited to provide comment on the 

reports if they wish to. 

 

There are three further progress reports due. Jenna Taylor will circulate these to both the MRTMG and 



the MRSAG as soon as they are received by PHA. 

 

With regards to the remaining contract, as has been advised previously, one of the Australian 



researchers in Acelino Alfenas’ collaborative group of international researchers working on P. psidii 

was to contact Acelino then develop and provide to PHA a proposal for Acelino to make collections of 



P. psidii in South America and send them to Australia for use in research that will complement the 

whole genome sequencing of U. rangelii that is currently being undertaken by NSW DPI. The 

collections may be used in morphological work also. Acelino is available to travel to Australia in June 

to attend a Myrtle Rust workshop in Sydney. This workshop will be funded by the Myrtle Rust 



 

Minutes  

 

 

 

 



Page 2 of 11

 

Transition to Management Program and will provide an opportunity to discuss the Program’s research 

projects, the outcomes of this science, as well as future directions. 

 

Item 5 – Report on Myrtle Rust Activities in Queensland 



 

Geoff Pegg gave an update on Myrtle Rust activities in Queensland. His report is attached at 

Attachment A. 

 

Item 6 – Report on Myrtle Rust Activities in NSW 



 

Satendra Kumar and Graham Wilson gave an update on Myrtle Rust activities in NSW. His report is 

attached at Attachment B. 

 

Item 7 – Report on Myrtle Rust Activities in Victoria 



 

Russell McMurray gave an update on Myrtle Rust activities in Victoria. His report is attached at 

Attachment C. 

 

Item 8 – Report on National Myrtle Rust Activities 

 

David Forsyth gave an update on national Myrtle Rust activities. His report is attached at  



Attachment D. 

 

Item 9 – Report on the Australian Seed Bank Partnership  

 

Lucy Sutherland gave an update on the Australian Seed Bank Partnership’s Myrtle Rust activities. Her 



report is attached at Attachment E. 

 

Colin Grant suggested that Lucy take the lead on coordinating the development of a Caring for our 



Country application and to liaise with PHA in arranging a meeting with any MRTMG Members who are 

interested in contributing to the development of this proposal. 

 

Item 10 – Report on Forestry Activities 

 

Gavin Matthew gave an update on the Forestry industry’s Myrtle Rust activities. His report is attached 



at Attachment F. 

 

Item 11 – Cessation Strategy 

 

Colin Grant reminded the Members that the Myrtle Rust Transition to Management Program would 



conclude at the end of June 2013 and it is likely that there will be no further funding available beyond 

June other than Caring for our Country and Biodiversity Fund funding. As such, Colin had asked Jenna 

Taylor to draft a Cessation Strategy for the Program which was similar to the Cessation Strategy that 

was written by DAFF Queensland for the Asian Honey Bee Transition to Management Program. Jenna 

has done so and a draft Cessation Strategy was circulated to the MRTMG prior to the meeting. 

 

Colin highlighted the fact that future activities have been identified in the draft Cessation Strategy. In 



some cases a party has already agreed to fund the activity, for example maintenance of the Myrtle 

Rust Transition to Management Program website by PHA. In other cases, although no one party has as 

of yet agreed to fund the activity, we can be confident that it will be funded, for example national 

registration of the most effective fungicide(s) for controlling Myrtle Rust (as identified in the Myrtle 

Rust Transition to Management Program-funded fungicide efficacy trials) will be completed and funded 

by chemical registrants. In other cases still, for example the building of a comprehensive ex situ 

collection of Myrtaceae species to support conservation placing prioriy on collecting threatened species 

and building a genetically diverse collection, it is intended that a funding proposal will be submitted 

for the activity.  

 


 

Minutes  

 

 

 

 



Page 3 of 11

 

In the case of the activities that remain, funding must be committed to each before the end of June so 

that the MRTMG will not have to coordinate this beyond the conclusion of the Myrtle Rust Transition to 

Management Program. It was discussed that many Members do not yet have an indication of their 

organisation’s budget for the next financial year and as such are unable to commit funding at this 

stage. 


 

It was agreed that this issue should be discussed further at the next meeting at which time the 

Members may be aware of their organisations’ budgets for the next financial year and therefore which 

activities they may be able to commit to. 

 

Item 12 – Next Meeting 

 

Members were reminded that the next meeting was scheduled for 3.00-4.00pm AEDST on Tuesday 



16th April 2013 and were asked to add this time and date to their diaries. 

 

Item 13 – Close of Meeting 

 

The Chair thanked the Members of the MRTMG for their participation in the teleconference and closed 



the meeting. 

 

 



 

Minutes  

 

 

 

 



Page 4 of 11

 

Attachment A 

 

 

 

Myrtle Rust in Queensland – report from DAFF Queensland for Myrtle Rust Transition 

to Management Group Meeting Eleven held by teleconference on Tuesday 19 February, 

2013 

 

Reports 

 

Myrtle Rust reports have declined in the last couple of months following extended hot and dry 



weather conditions. However, recent rains have seen a slow increase in infection levels on 

known hosts. 

 

Host Range 

 

New hosts for Queensland detected in January/February 2013 

 

Nine new species were identified as hosts of Myrtle Rust in Queensland in January and February. 



These are: 

 



 

Austromyrtus sp. (Lockerbie scrub) 

 



Backhousia hughseii 

 



Rhodamnia blairiana 

 



Syzygium apodophyllum 

 



Syzygium bamagense 

 



Syzygium erythrocalyx 

 



Syzygium endophloium 

 



Syzygium pseudofastigiatum 

 



Syzygium macilwraithianum 

 

Research 

 

Impact on Melaleuca quinquenervia 

Approximately two years of data has now been collected from a natural regeneration site of 



Melaleuca quinquenervia with disease ratings completed on a monthly basis. Other data collated 

includes impact on growth rate (done 6, 12 and 18 months since first detection) and impact on 

flowering rate. 

 

The findings are that there is a significant correlation between disease severity and apical 



growth rates and also between disease levels and flower production. 

 

Flowering was monitored over time and seed has now been collected from trees that were more 



resistant under field conditions. Seedlings have been germinated and will be tested under 

glasshouse conditions to determine levels of resistance/susceptibility within the progeny. 

 

Impact on Melaleuca quinquenervia regeneration plantings 

Four regeneration sites, established as part of the two million tree program, are being assessed 

in collaboration with Brisbane City Council and students from Griffith and Queensland 

Universities. Changes in disease severity are being assessed monthly in relation to site (inland 

vs coastal; mixed vs monoculture), climate, and tree age. Twelve months of data have been 

collated to date. 

 

 

 



 

 


 

Minutes  

 

 

 

 



Page 5 of 11

 

Disease Epidemiology studies 

Disease epidemiology data has been collated from sites in Brisbane examining disease incidence 

and severity in relation to climatic conditions. This data is being compared to experiment sites in 

NSW (Angus Carnegie). Approximately two years of data has been collated and is in the process 

of being analysed. 

 

Plantation eucalypts – resistance screening 

Disease screening has been completed for the main species used in hardwood plantation 

development in Queensland. These are: 

 



 



Eucalyptus cloeziana (Gympie messmate – inland and coastal ecotypes) 

 



Eucalyptus argophloia (Chinchilla white gum – rare and endangered) 

 



Corymbia citriodora subsp. citriodora (Spotted gum) 

 



Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata (Spotted gum) 

 



Corymbia henryi (Spotted gum) 

 



Corymbia torelliana (Gadagii) 

 



Corymbia torelliana x CCV hybrids (Corymbia hybrid) 

 

Of all species tested Eucalyptus argophloia was found to be most susceptible. However, in all 



cases resistance was identified at a provenance level. Studies on Eucalyptus cloeziana suggest 

some ecotype difference with coastal provenances being more susceptible than inland 

provenances.  

 

Evidence from all studies shows the possibility of selecting trees for breeding resistance.  



 

A paper has been submitted: 

 

Pegg GS, Brawner JT, Oostenbrink J, Lee DJ



 

Screening Corymbia populations for resistance to 



Puccinia psidii. Submitted December 2012 Plant Pathology 

 

Testing  of  eucalypt species of significance to Asia and Africa has  commenced in collaboration 



with FABI (University of Pretoria). Seedlings are being established and inoculations will 

commence in approximately two months’ time. Species being studied include: 

 



 



Eucalyptus camaldulensis 

 



Eucalyptus grandis 

 



Eucalyptus pellita 

 



Eucalyptus urophylla 

 

Seed includes provenance material from Australia and seed orchard material from, Asia, South 



Africa and Zimbabwe. 

 

Student Projects 

Honours Project – Griffith Uni 

Studying the impact of Myrtle Rust on the rare and endangered Gossia gonoclada. 

 

PhD Student – QUT 



Impact of Myrtle Rust on flora and fauna in coastal Melaleuca ecosystems. 

 

Minutes  

 

 

 

 



Page 6 of 11

 

Attachment B 

 

 

 

Myrtle  Rust in NSW –  report from NSW DPI and OEH for  Myrtle Rust Transition to 

Management Group Eleven held by teleconference on Tuesday 19 February, 2013 

 

Geographic Range 

 

Reports in natural areas are down from last year. 



 

Despite Myrtle Rust being considered endemic in NSW, the disease is yet to be reported in 

natural vegetation in the west of the Great Dividing Range.  

 

Communication 

 

The NSW DPI Biosecurity website (http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/biosecurity/plant/myrtle-rust) is 



being updated regularly and remains the major site for information on Myrtle Rust management 

in NSW. Further information on Myrtle Rust management in natural vegetation is available from 

http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/pestsweeds/20110683myrtlerustmp.htm. 

 

Management 

 

OEH is writing a best practice protocol to help minimise national spread of Myrtle Rust and other 



plant diseases. 

 

 



 

Minutes  

 

 

 

 



Page 7 of 11

 

Attachment C 

 

 

 

Myrtle Rust in Victoria – report from DPI Vic for Myrtle Rust Transition to Management 

Group Eleven held by teleconference on Tuesday 19 February, 2013 

 

Geographic Range 

 

There has been only one detection of Myrtle Rust since the last meeting in December 2012. This 



was on a private property in the eastern metro area of Melbourne.  

 

The total number of infected premises stands at 72 mainly across Melbourne with outliers in 



Shepparton, Lorne, Bairnsdale, and Ballarat. 

 

The disease is still active at a number of sites but has not been detected in the natural bush.  



 

Low temperatures in late spring and the dry weather over summer has contributed to a much 

lower than expected spread of disease. 

 

Training and Communication 

 

A number of public information sessions were held since the last meeting and at least six more 



are planned in regional areas over autumn.  

 

Over 2000 people have now attended Myrtle Rust information sessions. 



 

There is still a strong demand from local councils and other land management groups for 

information and training. 

 

Version 2 of the CD-ROM of training resources, including images of symptoms found in Victoria 



is now available.  

 

The DPI website was updated recently, including dates of upcoming information sessions. 



Around400 visits per month have been made to the Myrtle Rust landing page. 

 

Information and/or images were provided for field days, festivals, council newsletters, and 



magazines. 

 

Surveillance and Tracing 

 

There has been good participation from stakeholder groups in the surveillance program.  



 

Over 150 sentinel sites have now been established and data from these sites is being provided 

by land managers, e.g. Parks Victoria, for collation by DPI. These sites provide early warning in 

high risk areas such as significant bushland sites.  

 

Market Access and Compliance 

 

From 30 June 2012, Myrtle Rust has been declared as an endemic disease in Victoria and the 



Victorian Importation Order has been rescinded. This means that Myrtle Rust host material is 

able to enter Victoria from disease-affected states without certification. It remains illegal under 

Victorian plant biosecurity legislation to sell plants with visible symptoms of Myrtle Rust. 

 

 



 

 


 

Minutes  

 

 

 

 



Page 8 of 11

 

Management 

 

The Victorian Myrtle Rust Coordination Committee of government and industry representatives 



has not met since the last meeting but are being kept aware of developments.  

 

DPI activities are according to “Phase 3 – Monitoring Plan for Myrtle Rust”, which focuses on 



providing training and technical advice to land managers, following up detections in new hosts 

and high risk areas of plantation and natural bush and collecting surveillance and impact data.   

 

 

 



 

Minutes  

 

 

 

 



Page 9 of 11

 

Attachment D 

 

 

 

National Myrtle Rust activities – report from DSEWPaC for Myrtle Rust Transition to 

Management Group Eleven held by teleconference on Tuesday 19 February, 2013 

 

Workshop 

 

DSEWPaC held its “Myrtle Rust in natural ecosystems” National Workshop in Canberra in December.  



 

A two page summary of the outcomes of the Workshop will be circulated to participants shortly. 

 

Management 

 

DSEWPaC is writing a threat abatement plan for Phytophthora with a view to doing the same for 



Myrtle Rust in the future.

 

Minutes  

 

 

 

 



Page 10 of 11

 

Attachment E 

 

 

 

The Australian Seed Bank Partnership’s Myrtle Rust activities – report from the 

Australian Seed Bank Partnership for Myrtle Rust Transition to Management Group 

Eleven held by teleconference on Tuesday 19 February, 2013 

 

Caring for our Country Update 

 

The call for submission of applications for Caring for our Country funding came out last week.  



 

Page 15 of the Caring for our Country Guidelines for applicants indicates support for seed-

related work and consequently provides opportunities for a bid to build collections of species 

susceptible to Myrtle Rust i.e. ‘While we are seeking applications to maximise on-ground 



activities, we recognise that many recovery programs incorporate other activities such as 

education or appropriate collection and storage of seed. Applications are invited for projects that 

invest in education, training or other activities supporting species recovery programs where it 

can be demonstrated that these activities are essential to the success of on-ground outcomes.’ 

 

Lucy has contacted the ASBP members to ensure that there would be no conflict or overlap with 



applications they may be preparing for local work. At the moment there are no obvious conflicts 

and Lucy is proposing that an application be prepared for the building of an ex situ collection of 

Myrtaceae species to support species recovery. Lucy is not currently clear on the size of this 

proposed project and whether it will require an Expression of Interest (projects over $1 million) 

due on 18 March or a full application (projects $50,000-1 million) due 10 April. 

 

Updates from Select Individual Partners 

 

Lucy had nothing additional to report from the last meeting in terms of the ASBP partners and their 



Myrtle Rust-related work. 

 

 



 

Minutes  

 

 

 

 



Page 11 of 11

 

Attachment F 

 

 

 

The Forestry Industry’s Myrtle Rust activities – report from the Australian Forest 

Products Association for Myrtle Rust Transition to Management Group Eleven held by 

teleconference on Tuesday 19 February, 2013 

 

Situation Update 

 

There have been no detections of Myrtle Rust in plantations. 



 

The forestry industry’s Industry Biosecurity Plan has been finalised and released. 



 

Document Outline



Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə