Monjebup north



Yüklə 280.87 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix06.09.2017
ölçüsü280.87 Kb.
  1   2   3

 

 

 



 

MONJEBUP NORTH

Ecological Restoration Project

                                                2012 ‐ 2013



MONJEBUP NORTH ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECT REPORT 2012 – 2013 

 

THRESHOLD ENVIRONMENTAL 2014                                                                                                                                      

 

MONJEBUP NORTH ECOLOGICAL 



RESTORATION PROJECT 2012‐2013  

Final Report 

 

 

Prepared by Justin Jonson 



THRESHOLD ENVIRONMENTAL 

2014 


 

A project commissioned by Bush Heritage Australia  

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

USE OF THIS REPORT 

Information  used  in  this  report  may  be  copied  or  reproduced  for  study,  research  or  educational  purposes, 

subject to inclusion of acknowledgement of the source. 

 

DISCLAIMER 

In undertaking this work, the author has made every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information reported. 

Any  conclusion  drawn  or  recommendations  made  in  the  report  and  maps  are  done  in  good  faith  and  the 

author takes no responsibility for how this information is used subsequently by others and accepts no liability 

whatsoever for a third party’s use of, or reliance upon, this specific report and associated maps. 

 

CITATION 

Jonson, J. (2014) Monjebup North Ecological Restoration Report 2012‐2013, A project commissioned by Bush 

Heritage Australia. Unpublished report. Threshold Environmental. Albany, Western Australia. 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

 

This  project  was  funded  by  Bush  Heritage  Australia  via  Gondwana  Link  Landscape  Manager  Simon 



Smale. Simon initiated the project, had the foresight to commission a Restoration Plan for the site in 

2010,  and  provided  strong  support  for  Threshold  Environmental  to  implement  the  2012  and  2013 

restoration work.    

 


MONJEBUP NORTH ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECT REPORT 2012 – 2013 

 

THRESHOLD ENVIRONMENTAL 2014                                                                                                                                      

 

Craig Luscombe was the Seed Manager for Threshold Environmental over both years, identifying and 



collecting  the  bulk  of  the  seed  for  the  majority  of  plant  species  used  in  this  project.  Craig’s 

knowledge of the local flora and vegetation associations is far‐reaching and  this is reflected in  the 

148  plant  species  included  in  the  2012/2013  project  works.  Special  reference  should  be  made  to 

Craig’s extensive knowledge of the Melaleuca genera, of which he identified 23 species, and where 

he  played  a  large  role  in  getting  those  species  into  the  seed  mixes.  Craig  also  prepared  the  mulch 

mixes,  collected  serotinous  species  for  the  burn  piles,  and  worked  alongside  Threshold  staff  to 

spread and burn them respectively.   

 

Lien Imbrechts was the Restoration Officer for Threshold Environmental over both years, providing 



on‐ground  support  at  all  phases  of  the  work.  This  work  included  seed  collection  and  cleaning, 

preparation of seed mixes, field support during implementation and post‐establishment monitoring, 

and general project administration. Many long hours of field work in uncomfortable environmental 

conditions  were  taken  in  stride  across  the  two  years,  showing  true  commitment  to  the  on‐ground 

work of ecological restoration.  

 

Special  thanks  also  to  Dylan  Lehmann,  Bill  and  Jane  Thompson,  Simon  Smale,  Amelia  Luscombe, 



Benjamin Puglisi, Benjamin Boxshall, Lyn Knight, Alex Monvoisin and Zac Lehmann for working with 

Threshold Environmental to plant seedlings during this project.  

 

Final  thanks  to  Keith  Bradby  and  Amanda  Keesing  of  Gondwana  Link,  who  provided  both  material 



and moral support to Threshold Environmental throughout this work.  

 

 



MONJEBUP NORTH ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECT REPORT 2012 – 2013 

 

THRESHOLD ENVIRONMENTAL 2014                                                                                                                                      

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY  



 

Following  the  development  of  the  Monjebup  North  Ecological  Restoration  Plan  in  2011,  Threshold 

Environmental was contracted  to implement  the  Monjebup  North Restoration  Project in 2012 and 

2013. In that time frame 240 hectares of best‐practice ecological restoration were established across 

the northern section of the cleared land. A total of 148 plant species were included in this two‐year 

restoration  effort.  These  species  were  organised  into  13  different  vegetation  systems  matched  to 

soil  type;  in  an  effort  to  re‐establish  vegetation  communities  reflecting  the  surrounding  remnant 

vegetation as best as possible. In addition to the direct‐seeding, 6,809 seedlings were planted in 203 



discrete  node  configurations.  Pure  seed  was  also  hand‐broadcast  in  52  nodes  across  the  2012 

project  area.  To  further  enhance  the  direct  seeding  and  node  plantings,  a  total  of  2,857  Banksia 



media seedlings were planted across the entire 240 hectares in an approximate 30 x 28 meter grid. 

In  the  2012  project  area  824  Banksia  caleyi  seedlings  were  also  planted  in  a  30  x  28  meter  grid 

density in all systems except the lower Yate swamp system (VegSys2.2). In the Yate Systems, 1,330 

Eucalyptus  occidentalis  seedlings  were  planted  at  a  14  x  16  meter  density  in  the  ‘Yate  Hi’‐areas 

(VegSys2.1), and a 13 x 13 meter density in the ‘Yate Low’ areas (VegSys2.2). Across the 2012 area, 

5.5 kilometres of 5‐meter wide graded passes (‘seams’) were strategically positioned on the contour. 

On these graded seams, a selection of locally collected vegetation was deposited as chipped mulch 

and  184  small  piles  of  fire‐responsive  serotinous  vegetation  were  burnt  in  situ.  In  addition,  16 

habitat  debris  piles  were  constructed  for  use  by  reptiles  and  small  mammals.  Permanent 

monitoring plots have been established at 36 locations across the entire 2012/2013 project area to 

assess  the  initial  recruitment  of  plants  after  project  implementation.  Results  indicate  a  consistent 

and uniform recruitment in line with the project objectives.     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


MONJEBUP NORTH ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECT REPORT 2012 – 2013 

 

THRESHOLD ENVIRONMENTAL 2014                                                                                                                                      

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 



 

Introduction.............................................................................................

I.  

2012 Program ................................................................................ 

 

a. 



Monitoring 2012: Method and Results ............................................ 

 

b. 



Operational Notes for the 2012 Program......................................... 

 

II. 



2013 Program................................................................................. 

 

a. 



Monitoring 2012: Method and Results ............................................ 

 

b. 



Operational Notes for the 2013 Program......................................... 

 

III. 



Final Project Summary 2012 – 2013 ................................................ 

References ............................................................................................... 

Appendices .............................................................................................. 

 

 



6

6

11

13



14

15

17



18

19

20

 

 

 

MONJEBUP NORTH ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECT REPORT 2012 – 2013 

 

THRESHOLD ENVIRONMENTAL 2014                                                                                                                                      

 

Introduction 



 

This report presents the technical information and initial results of the implementation of two years 

of  on‐ground  ecological  restoration  work  at  Bush  Heritage  Australia’s  Monjebup  North  Reserve. 

Threshold  Environmental  Pty  Ltd  consolidated  and  improved  information  developed  in  the 

Monjebup  North  Ecological  Restoration  Plan  (Jonson  2011)  and  Monjebup  North  Vegetation 

Assessment (Jonson 2011) to implement the most sophisticated revegetation program seen within 

Gondwana  Link  to  date.  This  report  presents  the  background  information  underpinning  two 

successive seasons, which include 100 hectares in 2012 and 140 hectares in 2013.  

 

I.

 

2012 Program 

 

The  North‐Western  paddock  (110  hectares)  of  the  Monjebup  North  property  was  allocated  for 

restoration in 2012. The Monjebup North Restoration Plan (Jonson 2011) served as a basis for the 

design of a more detailed restoration map prior to project implementation. Three broadly defined 

vegetation  associations  were  initially  identified  in  the  Restoration  Plan,  and  these  were  converted 

into  a  more  detailed  layout.  With  map  in  hand,  modifications  were  applied  to  maximise 

heterogeneity of plant community composition and structure for the benefit of potential future use 

and  habitation  by  local  fauna.  This  process  resulted  in  the  development  of  eight  detail‐rich 

vegetation restoration systems (Fig 1 and 2). 

 

Figure 1. Restoration Map as per the Monjebup North Restoration Plan (Jonson 2011). 



    

Figure 2. The 2012 operational map showing a modified layout of the revegetation systems.     



MONJEBUP NORTH ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECT REPORT 2012 – 2013 

 

THRESHOLD ENVIRONMENTAL 2014                                                                                                                                      

 

These eight different vegetation systems are matched to their respective soil types, and were direct‐



seeded in June 2012 (Fig 3). They are defined as follows: 

 

1.



 

VegSys 1.0 – Tall Mallee Shrubland (14.85 Ha) 

2.

 



VegSys 2.1 – Upland Yate Swamp (20.4 Ha) 

3.

 



VegSys 2.2 – Lowland Yate Swamp (6.63 Ha) 

4.

 



VegSys 3.1 – Gritty Sand and Gravel Mallee Scrubland (9.73 Ha) 

5.

 



VegSys 3.2 – Sandy Gravel Duplex Mallee Shrubland Bordering the Yate (11.3 Ha) 

6.

 



VegSys 3.3 – Sandy Gravel Spongelitic Duplex Mallee Shrubland ‘Core’ (19.34 Ha) 

7.

 



VegSys 3.4 – Sandy Gravel Spongelite Duplex Mallee Shrubland ‘Connector’ (15.4 Ha) 

8.

 



VegSys 3.5 – Sandy Gravelly Duplex Mallee Shrubland ‘Southeast Drain’ (6.58 Ha) 

 

Figure 3. Operational map of 2012 areas showing the tractor workings across the eight systems in situ. Access 



tracks  (red  lines)  are  15  m  wide  on  the  perimeter,  while  internal  access  tracks  are  10  m.  Contour  graded 

‘seams’ (yellow lines) were established by two passes of the grader for total width of approximately 6 meters.

 

 

A  total  of  130  plant  species  were  utilised  in  the  2012  project  works.  Full  species  lists  for  each 



vegetation association can be found in Appendix A. To initiate establishment of vegetation, a variety 

of  restoration  techniques  were  used,  including  broad‐acre  direct‐seeding,  manual  direct‐seeding, 

seedling planting, chipping and mulching, and in situ burn piles. All plant species were allocated to 

each  of  the  eight  revegetation  systems  to  reflect  the  natural  composition  of  adjacent  plant 

assemblages as much as possible. This allows for the species to be matched to soil types, while also 

providing the appropriate conditions for a) asynchronistic flowering, b) complex structural diversity 

of vegetation forms, and c) representative diversity  of different  plant lifespan  capacities (i.e. short 

versus long lived species). The direct seeding was implemented from the 16

th

 till the 23



rd

 of July. 



MONJEBUP NORTH ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECT REPORT 2012 – 2013 

 

THRESHOLD ENVIRONMENTAL 2014                                                                                                                                      

 

SPECIES



Nodes  Count Total Seedling Count

Acacia assimilis

1

15

Acacia lasiocarpa



2

35

Acacia moirii



1

5

Acacia newbeyi



1

7

Acacia sphacelata



2

30

Acacia spongelitica



7

101


Acacia subcaerulea

1

15



Banksia caleyi

5

110



Banksia nutans

7

85



Chorizema aciculare

2

9



Daviesia benthamii

3

120



Dodonea stenozyga

4

94



Dryandra drummondii

3

53



Gompholobium tomentosum

1

15



Grevillea sp. pallinup

1

15



Hakea commutata

13

200



Hakea corymbosa

3

50



Hakea cygna

4

54



Hakea laurina

3

34



Hakea nitida

15

310



Hakea pandanicarpa

4

115



Hakea strumosa

21

406



Templetonia retusa

9

247



113

2125

SPECIES 

Hand Seeded Nodes

Acacia harveyi

2

Acacia lasiocarpa



1

Acacia trulliformis

1

Acacias mixed



1

Allocasuarina humilis

1

Baeckia sp. 1



1

Banksia nutans

1

Banksia sphaerocarpa



4

Beaufortia schaueri

1

Callitris pyramidalis



1

Calothamnus sanguineus

4

Conothamnus aureus



1

Dodonaea ptarmicaefolia

1

Dryandra drummondii



8

Eucalyptus conglobata

1

Eucalyptus pachyloma



2

Eucalyptus perangusta

2

Eucalyptus sporadica



1

Gastrolobium spinosum

2

Hakea strumosa



1

Isopogon trilobus

1

Kunzea preissiana



4

Kunzea recurva

2

Logania buxifolia



2

Melaleuca scabra

2

Melaleuca subfalcata



1

Rhagodia baccata

1

Verticordia plumosa



2

52

A total of 2,163 seedlings were used to establish 113 species‐specific ‘nodes’ across the 2012 area. 

The  distribution  of  these  seedling  nodes  are  illustrated  in  Figure  4  (Green  Stars).  The  number  of 

seedlings planted in any given node ranged from 4 to 60, with an average count of 19 seedlings per 

node. A summary of the seedling nodes is presented in Table 1a.     

 

 



Figure 4. Map showing the location and density of seedling ‘nodes’ and hand‐seeded patches across the north‐

western paddock. 

 

 

 



In addition to the seedling nodes, a number of hand‐seeded ‘patches’ were also established across 

the site in 2012. The location and density of these patches are illustrated in Figure 4 (Yellow Stars). A 

summary of the species used in the hand‐seeded patches is presented in Table 1b.   

 

Tables 1a & 1b. Summary of seedling ‘nodes’ (a) and hand‐seeded Patches (b).  



a. 

b.

Wide‐spaced seedling planting approaches were also employed across the 2012 area. This included 



the  planting  of  923  Banksia  media  seedlings  planted  in  a  grid  across  all  systems  within  the  100 

hectares  at  an  approximate  30  x  28  meter  spacing.  In  addition,  824  Banksia  caleyi  seedlings  were 

also  planted  a  similar  grid‐like  spacing  density.  This  B.  caleyi  seedling  grid  was  positioned 


MONJEBUP NORTH ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECT REPORT 2012 – 2013 

 

THRESHOLD ENVIRONMENTAL 2014                                                                                                                                      

 

approximately  15  meters  offset  from  the  B.  media  seedling  grid.  The  B.  caleyi  seedlings  were  also 



planted  in  all  2012  systems  except  for  the  lower  Yate  swamp  system  (VegSys2.1).  This  approach 

allows for a very equal distribution of these keystone species across the entire 100 hectares. 

For  the  Yate  Systems  (27.03  hectares  in  total),  1,330  Eucalyptus  occidentalis  seedlings  were  hand‐

planted  to  enable  better  control  of  stocking  densities.  For  the  ‘Yate  Swamp  Hi’  (VegSys2.1)  areas, 

seedlings were planted at a 14 x 16 meter spacing, for a target density of approximately 45 stems 

per  hectare.  Densities  were  slightly  increased  in  the  ‘Yate  Swamp  Low’  (VegSys2.2)  areas  with 

seedlings planted at approximately 13 x 13 meters for a resulting planting density of about 64 stems 

per hectare.  

Across  the  2012  project  area,  5.5  kilometres  of  5  meter  wide  graded  and  ripped  passes  were 

established on the contour in several locations. On these graded ‘seams’, locally collected vegetation 

was applied as chipped mulch. In addition, 186 small piles of seed‐carrying branches selected from 

fire‐responsive  serotinous  plant  species  were  spread  across  the  seams  and  burned  in  situ  to 

stimulate  germination  of  the  included  species.  The  location  and  distribution  of  these  burn  piles  is 

shown in Figure 5.  

Figure 5. The 2012 operational map showing the location of the 186 fire‐triggered serotinous burn piles 

distributed along some of the contour graded seams. 

 

 

Species used for the fire‐responsive serotinous species burn piles were Dryandra cirsioidesDryandra 



nervosa,  Isopogon  trilobus,  Petrophile  seminuda,  Isopogon  buxifolius,  Hakea  corymbosa,  Hakea 

pandanicarpa, and Petrophile phylicoides. The objective of this approach was to increase the species 

diversity  within  the  revegetated  areas,  when  no  seedlings  of  these  species  had  been  pre‐ordered, 

nor was seed available for inclusion within the direct‐seeding mixes. The technique used is depicted 

in  the  photos  in  Figure  6.  Although  initial  establishment  from  this  technique  did  not  seem 

significantly  encouraging,  observations  in  year  2  have  identified  recruitment  of  some  of  the  target 

species  including  Dryandra  cirsioides,  Dryandra  drummondii,  Dryandra  nervosa,  Hakea 



pandanicarpaIsopogon buxifolius, and Hakea corymbosa

 


MONJEBUP NORTH ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION PROJECT REPORT 2012 – 2013 

 

THRESHOLD ENVIRONMENTAL 2014                                                                                                                                      

10 

 

Figure 6. Photo montage showing several of the steps involved with the fire‐responsive serotinous vegetation 



burn pile approach. (tl) Grader work; (tr) branches piled; (bl) J. Jonson and C. Luscombe light piles; (br) D. 

Lehmann (in background) tends to some of the burning piles.

 

 

Using the practice of re‐vegetation as the primary tool for an ecological restoration project is likely 



to be the most effective means to re‐establishing many of the ecological functions supporting faunal 

populations. However, the absence of course woody debris within revegetated areas over the first 

20 years presents substantial time lags in the provision of those critical habitat conditions (Munro et 

al.  2010).  In  an  effort  to  establish  some  form  of  immediate,  yet  long‐term,  structural  habitat 

features, 16 ‘habitat debris piles’ were constructed across the site (Figure 7).  

 

The  intended  objective  of  these  wood‐and‐rock  built  structures  is  to  support  reptile  and  small 



mammal species known to be potential site occupants over the coming decades. It should be noted 

these  efforts  were  experimental.  While  definitive  projections  regarding  their  anticipated 

contribution  to  faunal  use  on  the  site  are  not  possible,  we  can  report  their  establishment  and 

existence on site as 16 additional built‐environment habitat treatments. Photos of the habitat debris 

piles are shown in Appendix B. 

 


MONJEB

: 2016
2016 -> По антикоррупционной работе в поликлинике
2016 -> AZƏrbaycan respublikasi səHİYYƏ naziRLİYİ azərbaycan tibb universiteti
2016 -> Agnela da Cruz Henriques de Barros Wilper Statement (afta 2016)
2016 -> Seks riSKƏ BƏrabər deyiL!!
2016 -> Qastroentrologiya 1 Yaşlı insanlarda qida borusunun uzunluğu təqribən nə qədərdir?
2016 -> Az Book Library Palanik Çak DÖYÜŞÇÜ klubu “Döyüşçü klubu”nun birinci qaydasında deyilir: «“Döyüşçü klubu” barədə heç kimə danışmamaq
2016 -> Az Book Library Filosof Fikri
2016 -> Ubutumire uniib iratumiye abantu, imigwi y'abantu canke amashirahamwe bose bipfuza gushikiriza inkuru hamwe/canke ivyandiko bijanye n'ihonyangwa ry'agateka ka zina muntu hamwe n'ayandi mabi yose vyakozwe I Burundi guhera mu kwezi kwa Ndamukiza


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə