Mount gibson mining iron hill flora and vegetation assessment based on regional and local floristic analyses



Yüklə 3.99 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/7
tarix02.09.2017
ölçüsü3.99 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

MARCH 2016 

 

 

MOUNT GIBSON MINING 



IRON HILL FLORA AND VEGETATION ASSESSMENT BASED ON 

REGIONAL AND LOCAL FLORISTIC ANALYSES 

REVISION 1 

 

 



 

 

This page has been left blank intentionally. 



 

Mount Gibson Mining 

Iron Hill Flora and Vegetation Assessment Based on Regional and Local Floristic Analyses 

 

March 2016 



 

 

 



 

iii


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Document Status 

Rev 

Author 

Reviewer 

Date 

Approved for Issue 

Name 

Distributed 

To 

Date 

Draft 


M Macdonald 

M Hay 


02/03/2016 

S Grein 


M Hamilton 

02/03/2016 

Revision 

M Macdonald 

M Hay 

03/03/2016 



S Grein 

M Hamilton 

03/03/2016 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

ecologia Environment (2016). Reproduction of this report in whole or in part by electronic, mechanical 

or chemical means including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval 

system, in any language, is strictly prohibited without the express approval of Mount  Gibson Mining 

and/or ecologia Environment. 

 

Restrictions on Use 

This report has been prepared specifically for Mount Gibson Mining. Neither the report nor its contents 

may be referred to or quoted in any statement, study, report, application, prospectus, loan, or other 

agreement document, without the express approval of Mount Gibson Mining  and/or  ecologia 

Environment. 

 

ecologia Environment 

1/224 Lord Street 

PERTH WA 6000 

Phone:  08 96168 7200 

Email: 


admin@ecologia.com.au

 


Mount Gibson Mining 

Iron Hill Flora and Vegetation Assessment Based on Regional and Local Floristic Analyses 

 

March 2016 



 

 

 



 

iv

 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

1 

INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 1 

1.1 


BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................................... 1 

1.2 


PREVIOUS FLORA AND VEGETATION ASSESSMENTS ................................................................ 2 

2 

METHODS FOR SURVEY AND ANALYSIS ............................................................................. 5 

2.1 


FLORISTIC SURVEY ..................................................................................................................... 5 

2.2 


TARGETED SURVEY .................................................................................................................... 7 

3 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ................................................................................................ 9 

3.1 


FLORA ........................................................................................................................................ 9 

3.2 


VEGETATION ...........................................................................................................................10 

3.3 


SURVEY LIMITATIONS .............................................................................................................26 

4 

CONCLUSIONS ................................................................................................................ 29 

5 

REFERENCES ................................................................................................................... 31 

TABLES 

Table 3.1 – Floristic groups at Iron Hill ...................................................................................................23 

Table 3.2 – Floristic group and vegetation mapping (Bennett 2000) comparison .................................24 

Table 3.3 – Floristic subgroup and vegetation mapping (Bennett 2000) comparison ...........................25 

Table 3.3 – Survey limitations ................................................................................................................26 

FIGURES 

Figure 2.1 – Mean monthly, 2014 (–) and 2015 (–) rainfall (Paynes Find BoM 007139) ......................... 5 

Figure 2.2 – Species accumulation curve for 167 quadrats ..................................................................... 7 

Figure 2.3 – Iron Hill quadrats, transects and significant flora records (ecologia 2015) ......................... 8 

Figure 3.1 – Mt Gibson Iron Hill floristic analysis (Bray-Curtis coefficient) ............................................15 

Figure 3.2 – Iron Hill floristic groups ......................................................................................................17 

Figure 3.3 – Mount Gibson Ranges floristic groups ...............................................................................18 

Figure 3.4 – Regional quadrats by floristic group ...................................................................................19 



  

 

 



Mount Gibson Mining 

Iron Hill Flora and Vegetation Assessment Based on Regional and Local Floristic Analyses 

 

March 2016 



 

 

 



 

v

 



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

Mount Gibson Mining Limited is seeking to obtain environmental approvals for the operational 

expansion of hematite production from its Mount Gibson Iron Ore Mine and Infrastructure Project, 

including a proposal to mine the Iron Hill deposits, approximately 2.5 km south of the existing Extension 

Hill mine.  

To provide additional data on the flora and vegetation of the proposed Iron Hill disturbance area, 

including the delineation of floristic groups, Mount Gibson Mining engaged ecologia to complete a flora 

and vegetation assessment, including sampling 17 additional quadrats (each 20 x 20 m) within and 

adjacent to the proposed Iron Hill development envelope and floristic analysis to assess the vegetation 

at Iron Hill, incorporating the new floristic data and previously collected data. In addition, Priority flora 

searches were conducted across the study area in areas not known to be covered by previous targeted 

flora searches. 

A total of 115  vascular flora taxa were recorded from the 17 quadrats and transects surveyed in 

April/May 2015. Eight of the quadrats are located within the area covered by the Iron Hill proposal and 

nine are located in similar vegetation nearby. The vegetation condition in all quadrats sampled in 2015 

was rated as either ‘Excellent’ or ‘Very Good’. One Threatened flora species (Darwinia masonii) was 

recorded, within areas where the species has previously been recorded. No Priority flora taxa were 

recorded. Three range extensions were recorded: Hibbertia hypericoidesHemigenia macphersonii and 



Sclerolaena eriacantha and eight additional taxa were recorded at the edge of their range: Eremophila 

eriocalyxEucalyptus kochii subsp. amaryssiaLeucopogon sp. Clyde Hill (M.A. Burgman 1207), Mirbelia 

sp. Bursarioides (T.R. Lally 760), Philotheca sericeaProstanthera althoferi subsp. althoferiProtanthera 



patensSida sp. Golden calyces glabrous (H.N. Foote 32). One introduced species (*Pentameris airoides 

subsp. airoides) was also recorded. 

The 167 quadrats in the floristic analysis were classified into 14  floristic groups. Six  of these floristic 

groups (A, B, C1, C2, E and K) are recorded at Iron Hill and Iron Hill South (collectively known as Iron Hill). 

Floristic groups are related to the geographic location of the quadrats, whereby the quadrats from Iron 

Hill ironstone ridges and slopes belong exclusively to groups E and K, and those from the shrublands and 

woodlands of the adjacent plains are represented in groups A, B , C1 and C2. Within the proposed Iron 

Hill development envelope, floristic groups E and K are associated with the ironstone hills and slopes 

and are considered to be key components of the Priority 1 Mount Gibson Range vegetation complexes 

(banded ironstone formation) Priority Ecological Community. 

Floristic group K, the largest PEC floristic group (with respect to both number of quadrats and area 

mapped) was further divided into three subgroups, K1, K2 and K3. These three subgroups are similar in 

species composition and many taxa are common to all three subgroups, but may be represented in 

different frequencies. 

 

 


Mount Gibson Mining 

Iron Hill Flora and Vegetation Assessment Based on Regional and Local Floristic Analyses 

 

March 2016 



 

 

 



 

vi

 



This page has been left blank intentionally. 

 


Mount Gibson Mining 

Iron Hill Flora and Vegetation Assessment Based on Regional and Local Floristic Analyses 

 

March 2016 



 

 

 



 

1

 



1

 

INTRODUCTION 

1.1

 

BACKGROUND 

Mount Gibson Mining Limited is seeking to obtain environmental approvals for the operational 

expansion of hematite production from its Mount Gibson Iron Ore Mine and Infrastructure Project, 

including a proposal to mine the Iron Hill deposits, approximately 2.5 km south of the existing Extension 

Hill mine. The proposed Iron Hill Development Envelope is approximately 2.5 km wide and covers 112 

hectares (ha). The Western Australian Environment Protection Authority (EPA) issued an Environmental 

Scoping Document (ESD) outlining additional environmental assessment works required prior to 

submission of the Public Environmental Review (PER) for the Iron Hill project. 

In particular, this report and its content address the following ESD requirements: 

10.

 

In areas not already surveyed or where survey information is not of acceptable quality (such as 

incorrect survey season), standard and/or the proponent intends to use results from surveys at a 

lower level than a Level 2, justification will be required to ensure those surveys are relevant, 

representative of the development envelope, and were carried out using methods consistent 

with current best practice. A peer review of the vegetation and flora information by a botanist 

with appropriate experience and expertise would also be required. 

11.

 

Identify and map vegetation units (including sub-units of the plant assemblages of the Mt Gibson 

Range PEC) and DRF, Priority flora and other conservation significant flora species and their 

areas to be cleared or indirectly impacted as defined in EPA Guidance Statement 51. Provide 

details of the methodology used in the identification and mapping of vegetation units. The 

vegetation units should be based on floristics, rather than structural vegetation features. 

Describe the condition of the vegetation. 

Conservation significant as defined in Guidance Statement 51 includes flora other than those 

that are listed at the State or national level as threatened, Priority and specially protected (e.g. 

endemic or restricted taxa, new taxa or affinities, taxa at the limits of their range, etc.). 

12.

 

Assess the impact on the different vegetation units (including sub-units of the plant assemblages 

of the Mt Gibson Range PEC). 

To provide additional data on the flora and vegetation of the proposed Iron Hill development envelope, 

Mount Gibson Mining engaged ecologia  to complete a flora and vegetation assessment, including 

sampling 17 additional quadrats within and adjacent to the proposed Iron Hill development envelope 

and floristic analysis to assess the vegetation values at Iron Hill, incorporating the new floristic data, and 

that previously collected by ATA Environmental in 2005 (ATA 2006b) and the Department of 

Environment and Conservation (DEC) Banded Iron Formation (BIF) survey conducted in 2005 (Meissner 

and Caruso 2008b). In addition, Threatened and Priority flora searches were conducted across the study 

area at approximately 50 m  intervals,  concentrating on  areas not previously  covered by targeted 

searches for Threatened and Priority flora. Threatened and Priority flora taxa  with potential to occur 

within the Iron Hill development envelope include: 

 



Darwinia masonii (Threatened) listed as Vulnerable under the WC Act and EPBC Act

 



Lepidosperma gibsonii (Threatened) listed as Vulnerable under the WC Act); 

 



Acacia cerastes (Priority 1); 

 



Allocasuarina tessellata (Priority 1); 

 



Chamelaucium sp. Yalgoo (Y. Chadwick 1816) (Priority 1); 

 



Grevillea scabrida (Priority 1); 

 



Micromyrtus trudgenii (Priority 3); 

Mount Gibson Mining 

Iron Hill Flora and Vegetation Assessment Based on Regional and Local Floristic Analyses 

 

March 2016 



 

 

 



 

2

 



 

Persoonia pentasticha (Priority 3); and 

 

Podotheca uniseta (Priority 3). 



1.2

 

PREVIOUS FLORA AND VEGETATION ASSESSMENTS 

Previous flora and vegetation assessments completed in the Mount Gibson Ranges include: 

 

Muir Environmental (1995): Observations on the Presence and Distribution of Rare Flora, 



especially Darwinia masonii, near Mt Gibson; 

 



Bennett Environmental Consulting (2000): Flora and Vegetation of Mt Gibson; 

 



ATA (2004): Targeted Search at Mt Gibson for the Declared Rare Flora Darwinia masonii

 



Armstrong (2004): Vegetation Assessment and Rare Flora Search between Perenjori and Mt 

Gibson; 


 

Griffin (2005): Numerical Analysis of Floristic Data in Mt Gibson Area, (based on the ATA (2006b) 



data); 

 



ATA (2006a): Chamelaucium sp. Yalgoo Supplementary Survey – Mt Gibson; 

 



ATA (2006b): Mt Gibson Magnetite Project Supplementary Vegetation and Flora Surveys; 

 



ATA (2006c): Targeted Survey at Mt Gibson for a new Lepidosperma sp. Mt Gibson; 

 



Coffey (2008a): Location of Darwinia masonii (DRF) Associated with Phase 1 Drill Pads – Extension 

Hill; 


 

Coffey (2008b): Locations of Lepidosperma gibsonii



 

Meissner and Caruso (2008b): Flora and vegetation of banded iron formations of the Yilgarn 



Craton: Mount Gibson and surrounding area; 

 



Borger and Nicholls (2013): Survey of Proposed Drill Lines in Tenement M59/339 at Extension Hill; 

 



Martinick Bosch Sell (2013): Targeted Flora Survey: Extension Hill Hematite Project, Midwest 

Region, Western Australia – Iron Hill and Gibson Hill Prospect Areas; 

 

Eco Logical (2014): Mount Gibson Ranges Darwinia masonii Census; 



 

Globe (2014): Iron Hill Deposit Assessment of the Threatened Taxa Category for Darwinia masonii 



using IUCN (2012) Criteria; 

 



Maia (2014): Mt Gibson Ranges Targeted Darwinia masonii Survey; and 

 



Martinick Bosch Sell (2014): Extension Hill Hematite Operations Annual Declared Rare Flora 

Monitoring. 

The original floristic data from the ATA (2006b) and Meissner and Caruso (2008) surveys were sourced 

for inclusion in the floristic analysis of this study.  



1.3 

Mid-west Regional Floristic Analysis 

In addition to the floristic analysis presented in following sections, a separate regional floristic analysis 

was completed by van Etten (2013), which places the previously collected Iron Hill quadrats in the 

context of other district and regional quadrats. The regional floristic analysis includes the (ATA 2006b) 

and Meissner and Caruso (2008b) datasets from the Mt Gibson Ranges used in this analysis, as well as 

the following regional data sources: 

 

DEC Tallering BIF Survey – 103 quadrats (Markey and Dillon 2008); 



 

DEC Koolanooka and Perenjori Hills BIF Survey – 50 quadrats (Meissner and Caruso 2008a); 



 

DEC Gullewa BIF Survey – 50 quadrats (Markey and Dillon 2010); 



 

DEC Yalgoo BIF Survey – 55 quadrats (Markey and Dillon 2011); 



 

Sandplains – 53 quadrats (Knuckey 2011); and  



 

EnviroWorks Mummaloo Flora and Vegetation Survey – 98 quadrats (EnviroWorks 2012). 



Mount Gibson Mining 

Iron Hill Flora and Vegetation Assessment Based on Regional and Local Floristic Analyses 

 

March 2016 



 

 

 



 

3

 



For analysis, quadrats from ironstone ridges at Mount Gibson Ranges were assigned as three groups: 

‘Mount Gibson’ (generally the eastern part of the range); ‘Extension Hill’ (generally the northern part of 

the range); and, ‘Iron Hill’ (in the central part of the range). The ordination output (Appendix A) shows 

that the Mount Gibson Ranges quadrats are similar to each other. As a collective set, the ‘Mt Gibson’ 

quadrats are generally similar in floristic composition to Tallering quadrats, whereas ‘Extension Hill’ 

quadrats and most of the ‘Iron Hill’ quadrats are more similar to the BIF quadrats of Koolanooka and 

Perenjori Hills, although there is some overlap. Not unexpectedly, ‘Iron Hill’ quadrats are similar to ‘Mt 

Gibson’ in some cases and ‘Extension Hill’ in others.  

Based on the regional analysis, van Etten (2013) found that: 

 



Analysis of the EnviroWorks Consulting (2012) quadrat data using alternative multivariate 

techniques had given strong support for the vegetation classification; in particular, the main plant 

communities defined by  EnviroWorks Consulting (2012) closely matched those found in the 

multivariate study.  This means that the technique is a strong surrogate for identifying floristic 

similarity between quadrats mapped as communities; 

 



Using only perennial species data in the multivariate analysis did not dramatically alter the 

vegetation classification with the main community types being consistently delineated and 

identified; 

 



A high level of floristic similarity was found between 100 m

2

 and 400 m



2

 quadrats surveyed. This 

supported the use of data from smaller sized quadrats in local and regional analyses

 



Multivariate analyses of the regional quadrat dataset shows that the vegetation of the 

Mummaloo area is dissimilar to the vegetation reported in other survey areas of the region. It is 

important to note that there is no broad-scale vegetation survey available for the region, with 

most surveys being restricted to particular geologies/landforms or development sites (e.g.  Mt 

Gibson Iron Ore mine); and 

 



The vegetation of Mummaloo area and the flats adjacent to ranges is distinct from vegetation on 

ironstone and greenstone ranges of the region,  including the PECs at ironstone ranges at Mt 

Gibson, Koolanooka and Blue Hills. 

Other evident findings were:  

 

Floristic composition in quadrats on most of the Mount Gibson tenements (Mt Gibson Mining), 



being the sandplains and flats adjacent and partly within the PEC (but not on ironstone ridges or 

slopes) were largely dissimilar from quadrats on ‘Mt Gibson Surrounds’ (Figure 1.1).  The clear 

distinction shows that the floristics of communities mapped on the Mt Gibson surrounds do not 

show general characteristics of the upslope or ironstone ridge communities;   

 

Mt Gibson ironstone communities and ‘Tallering BIF’ quadrats were similar, and clearly far more 



similar overall than ‘Mt Gibson Surrounds’ flats/plains or other regional ironstone ridge quadrats 

(being Yalgoo, Gullewa and Koolanooka-Perenjori). While they were similar to each other, they 

clearly are different to the floristics in quadrats adjacent to them on the flats and sandplains; 

 



The Iron Hill quadrat data map well within the typical set of floristic similarities from quadrats 

over Mt Gibson Ranges indicating that it is not atypical or unusual in its floristic composition for 

ironstone ridges or within the Mt Gibson Ranges.) 

 

 





Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə