National Recovery Plan Magenta Lilly Pilly Syzygium paniculatum



Yüklə 474.07 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü474.07 Kb.
  1   2   3

 

 

 

 

 

National Recovery Plan 



Magenta Lilly Pilly Syzygium paniculatum 

 

June 2012 

 


 

 

© Copyright State of NSW and the Office of Environment and Heritage, Department of Premier and 



Cabinet. 

 

With the exception of illustrations, the Office of Environment and Heritage, Department of Premier and 



Cabinet and State of NSW are pleased to allow this material to be reproduced in whole or in part for 

educational and non-commercial use, provided the meaning is unchanged and its source, publisher and 

authorship are acknowledged. Specific permission is required for the reproduction of illustrations. 

 

Published by: 



Office of Environment and Heritage NSW 

59 Goulburn Street, Sydney NSW 2000 

PO Box A290, Sydney South NSW 1232 

Phone: (02) 9995 5000 (switchboard) 

Phone: 131 555 (environment information and publications requests) 

Phone: 1300 361 967 (national parks, climate change and energy efficiency information, and publications 

requests) 

Fax: (02) 9995 5999 

TTY: (02) 9211 4723 

Email: info@environment.nsw.gov.au 

Website: www.environment.nsw.gov.au 

 

Report pollution and environmental incidents 

Environment Line: 131 555 (NSW only) or 

info@environment.nsw.gov.au

 

See also www.environment.nsw.gov.au 



 

Requests for information or comments regarding the recovery program for Magenta Lilly Pilly are best 

directed to: 

The Magenta Lilly Pilly Coordinator 

Biodiversity Assessment and Conservation Section, North East Branch 

Conservation and Regulation Division 

Office of Environment and Heritage 

Department of Premier and Cabinet 

Locked Bag 914  

Coffs Harbour NSW 2450 

Phone: 02 6651 5946 

 

Cover illustrator:  Lesley Elkan © Botanic Gardens Trust 



 

ISBN 978 1 74122 786 4 

June 2012 

DECC 2011/0259 

 


 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   i  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 



Recovery Plan for Magenta Lilly Pilly 

Syzygium paniculatum 

Foreword 

This document constitutes the national recovery plan for Magenta Lilly Pilly (Syzygium 



paniculatum) and, as such, considers the conservation requirements of the species across its 

known range. It identifies the actions to be taken to ensure the long term viability of the species 

in nature and the parties who will undertake these actions. 

Magenta Lilly Pilly is listed as vulnerable under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and 



Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 and endangered under the NSW Threatened Species 

Conservation Act 1995. The species is a small to medium-sized rainforest tree endemic to New 

South Wales, with a coastal distribution between Upper Lansdowne near Taree in the north and 

Conjola National Park near Sussex Inlet in the south. It is found on a range of land tenures and 

is represented in a number of national parks and nature reserves.  

The overall objective of this recovery plan is to protect known subpopulations of Magenta Lilly 

Pilly from decline and to ensure that wild populations of the species remain viable in the long 

term. Specific recovery objectives include: 

 



ensuring a coordinated and efficient approach to the implementation of recovery efforts 

 



establishing the full extent of the distribution of Magenta Lilly Pilly 

 



increasing the understanding of Magenta Lilly Pilly biology and ecology 

 



minimising the decline of Magenta Lilly Pilly through in situ habitat protection and 

management 

 

reducing impacts of Myrtle Rust on Magenta Lilly Pilly and its habitat 



 

maintaining a representative ex situ collection of Magenta Lilly Pilly 



 

raising awareness of the conservation significance of Magenta Lilly Pilly and involving 



the broader community in the recovery program. 

It is intended that the recovery plan will be implemented over a five year period.  

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   i i  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 



Acknowledgments 

The preparation of this recovery plan was funded by the Australian Government’s Natural 

Heritage Trust and has involved the combined effort of a number of people. The Office of 

Environment and Heritage, Department of Premier and Cabinet would like to acknowledge the 

following people for their contribution: 

Ian Hanson, Ian Wilkinson, Shane Ruming and Katrina McKay (Office of Environment and 

Heritage, Department of Premier and Cabinet) who prepared this recovery plan. 

Peter Richards and Phil Gilmour (Eco Logical Australia Pty Ltd) who collated information on the 

status of the species, much of which forms the basis for the background of this plan. 

Katie Thurlby who, along with supervisors William Sherwin (University of NSW), Maurizio 

Rossetto (Botanic Gardens Trust) and Peter Wilson (Botanic Gardens Trust), conducted the 

genetic research which frames the management context for many of the actions in this plan. 

Robert Payne (Ecological Surveys and Management), Kevin Mills (Kevin Mills & Associates), 

Ian Turner, Mel Schroder, Deb Holloman, Doug Beckers, John Eaton and Pete Turner (all Office 

of Environment and Heritage, Department of Premier and Cabinet), Chrissy Locke and Mark 

Armstrong (Department of Defence), Peter Wilson and Kim Hamilton (Botanic Gardens Trust), 

Alex Floyd (North Coast Regional Botanic Garden), Andrew Paget (Hunter-Central Rivers 

Catchment Management Authority), Martin Fortescue and Andrew Chalklen (Department of 

Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities) and Carole Helman 

(consultant) all provided valuable information and helpful feedback in relation to the species and 

the plan.  

The Office of Environment and Heritage, Department of Premier and Cabinet would also like to 

acknowledge the efforts of the many volunteer groups who have contributed to the protection of 

Magenta Lilly Pilly through their involvement in bush regeneration and the restoration of habitat.  



 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   i i i  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 



Table of Contents 

Foreword 

i

 

Acknowledgments 



ii

 

Table of Contents 



iii

 

Figures 



iv

 

Tables 



iv

 

1.

  In tro d u c tio n

 

5

 

2.  Le g is la tive   Co n te xt



 

5

 

2.1



 

Legal status 

5

 

3.  S p e c ie s   In fo rm a tio n



 

5

 

3.1



 

Taxonomy and description 

5

 

3.2



 

Distribution 

7

 

3.3



 

Life history and ecology 

12

 

4.  Th re a ts   a n d   Ma n a g e m e n t  Is s u e s



 

14

 

4.1



 

Current threats 

14

 

4.2



 

Ability of species to recover 

16

 

5.  P re vio u s   Re c o ve ry  Ac tio n s



 

17

 

5.1



 

Status review 

17

 

5.2



 

Research 

17

 

5.3



 

Management planning 

17

 

5.4



 

Surveys and mapping 

18

 

5.5



 

Habitat protection and management 

18

 

5.6



 

Weed management 

18

 

5.7



 

Fire management 

19

 

5.8



 

Pathogens 

19

 

6.  P ro p o s e d   Re c o ve ry  Ob je c tive s ,  Ac tio n s   a n d   P e rfo rm a n c e   Crite ria



 

19

 

6.1



 

Coordination of recovery efforts 

19

 

6.2



 

Targeted survey 

19

 

6.3



 

Research 

20

 

6.4



 

Habitat and threat management 

20

 

6.5



 

Disease and pathogens 

21

 

6.6



 

Ex situ conservation 

22

 

6.7



 

Community liaison, education, awareness and involvement 

23

 

7.  Im p le m e n ta tio n



 

23

 

8.  S o c ia l  a n d   Ec o n o m ic   Co n s e q u e n c e s



 

24

 

9.  Ro le   a n d   In te re s ts   o f  In d ig e n o u s   P e o p le



 

24

 

10.  Be n e fits   to   o th e r  s p e c ie s /e c o lo g ic a l  c o m m u n itie s



 

24

 

11.  P re p a ra tio n   De ta ils



 

24

 

12.  Re vie w  Da te



 

24

 

13.  Re fe re n c e s



 

25

 

14.  Ac ro n ym s



 

27

 

Appendix 1: Priority sites for Bitou Bush and Lantana Control 



29

 


 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   i v  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 



Figures 

Fig u re   1.

 

Transverse section of Magenta Lilly Pilly fruit showing seed containing 



multiple embryos. 

6

 



Fig u re   2.

 

Distribution of Magenta Lilly Pilly. 



8

 

Tables 



Table 1.

 

Features used to distinguish Magenta Lilly Pilly from similar species 



7

 

Table 2.

 

Location and tenure summary of Magenta Lilly Pilly populations 



11

 

Table 3.

 

Cost and implementation details of the Magenta Lilly Pilly Recovery Plan 



28

 

Table 4.

 

Priority sites identified in the NSW Bitou Bush Threat Abatement Plan (DEC 2006) 



where Magenta Lilly Pilly is present. Sites are listed from highest priority to lowest. 

29

 



Table 5.

 

Higher priority sites identified in the Plan to Protect Environmental Assets from 



Lantana (National Lantana Management Group 2010) where Magenta Lilly Pilly is 

present. 

32

 

 



 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   5  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 



1.

 

In tro d u c tio n



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly Syzygium paniculatum Gaertn. (Myrtaceae) is a small to medium-sized tree 

endemic to coastal New South Wales (NSW) between Taree in the north and Sussex Inlet in the 

south. The species is currently known from approximately 44 subpopulations in five 

metapopulations.  

This document constitutes the national recovery plan for Magenta Lilly Pilly and, as such, 

considers the requirements of the species across its known range. It identifies the actions that 

need to be undertaken to ensure the long term viability of the species in nature and the parties 

who will undertake such actions. The attainment of the objectives of this recovery plan is subject 

to budgetary and other constraints affecting the parties involved. The information in this 

recovery plan is accurate to January 2011.  

To secure the recovery of Magenta Lilly Pilly this recovery plan advocates recovery actions that 

favour a mix of in situ and ex situ management and provide for a greater understanding of the 

biology of the species.  

This plan has been prepared by the Office of Environment and Heritage, Department of Premier 

and Cabinet (OEH) in consultation with the Australian Government Department of Sustainability, 

Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), the Australian Government 

Department of Defence (DoD), local governments and other interested parties. 

2. 

Le g is la tive   Co n te xt 



2.1 

Legal status 

Magenta Lilly Pilly is listed as vulnerable under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and 



Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) and endangered under the NSW Threatened 

Species Conservation Act 1995 (TSC Act).  

Magenta Lilly Pilly is known to occur within the ‘littoral rainforest and coastal vine thickets’ 

threatened ecological community listed under the EPBC Act and its TSC Act equivalent, ‘littoral 

rainforest in the NSW North Coast, Sydney Basin and South East Corner bioregions’.  

This recovery plan has been prepared to comply with the requirements of the EPBC Act. 

3. 


S p e c ie s   In fo rm a tio n  

3.1 

Taxonomy and description 

3.1.1 

Taxonomic relationships 

Magenta Lilly Pilly belongs to the family Myrtaceae. There are between 500 and 1000 species in 

the genus Syzygium worldwide. Of these, 52 occur in Australia, with 47 of them being endemic 

(Hyland 1983; Wilson 2002).  

Prior to a major revision of the Australian members of Syzygium and other related genera 

(Hyland 1983), the species now known as Syzygium paniculatum was often referred to as 



Syzygium coolminianum (for instance, see Helman 1979), a totally separate species that is 

actually Syzygium oleosum. Confusingly, the current species Syzygium australe had, in the 

past, been referred to as Syzygium paniculatum and, as a consequence, most published 

records of Syzygium paniculatum that predate Hyland’s (1983) revision are actually Syzygium 



australe.  

 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   6  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 



3.1.2 

Taxonomic description 

Magenta Lilly Pilly is a small to medium-sized tree growing to a height of 18 m and a diameter at 

breast height of 40 cm. Occasionally, specimens up to 25 m in height and 1–2 m in diameter 

have been recorded (P. Gilmour pers. comm., R. Payne pers. comm. in Eco Logical Australia 

2006). In exposed situations the species may take the form of a small, coppiced tree or shrub.  

The trunk varies from straight to crooked (Floyd 2008), and coppices sometimes arise from the 

base or damaged sections (Payne 1997). Buttressing is not apparent (Floyd 2008), although 

shallow lateral roots may resemble spur buttresses on occasion. The outer bark is pinkish to 

reddish-brown, flaky on smaller trunks but becoming more platy on larger trunks (Floyd 2008; 

Wilson 2002). The branchlets are green, becoming brown. When fresh, these are slightly 

angular and dorsiventrally flattened. The older branchlets are rounded and slightly scaly (Floyd 

2008).  


The leaves are opposite, simple, entire, and lanceolate to slightly obovate, growing up to 10 cm 

in length and 3 cm in width. They possess prominent, tapered ‘drip-tips’, wedge-shaped bases, 

glossy, dark green upper surfaces with slightly sunken midribs, and paler lower surfaces. They 

also possess small, distinct, scattered oil glands and numerous lateral veins. An intra-marginal 

vein is discernible, and is close to the lamina edge. The petiole is 2–10 mm long (Floyd 2008; 

Wilson 2002). 

The flowers of the species are white and borne in terminal 

and upper-axillary panicles. They consist of four rounded 

petals, each one of which is 4–5 mm in width (Floyd 2008; 

Wilson 2002). The stamens are numerous and 6–16 mm 

long. The fruit is a magenta, globose to ovoid berry, although 

it can be white, pale pink or purple (Floyd 2008; Wilson 

2002). Fruit diameter is 12–25 mm. The fruit is also shiny 

and possesses fleshy distal calyx lobes (Floyd 2008). The 

seed, which is 5–15 mm in diameter, is brown, solitary, 

globular and polyembryonic, consisting of one to nine tightly 

packed embryos (Figure 1) (Thurlby 2010). The species 

flowers from summer to early autumn (December to March) 

and the fruits are evident in autumn, winter and early spring 

(March to September). 

Magenta Lilly Pilly is superficially similar to Brush Cherry 

(Syzygium australe), Blue Lilly Pilly (S. oleosum) and Lilly 

Pilly (Acmena smithii), which occur sympatrically within part 

or all of the natural range of Magenta Lilly Pilly. Magenta Lilly 

Pilly has also been widely planted throughout and beyond its 

known range, making it difficult at times to identify individuals 

based upon provenance. Table 1 provides a summary of the 

chief features used to distinguish Magenta Lilly Pilly from 

superficially similar species. 

Fig u re   1.

  Transverse 

section of Magenta Lilly 

Pilly fruit showing seed 

containing multiple 

embryos.  

Illustration: Lesley Elkan © 

Botanic Gardens Trust. 

 


 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   7  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

Ta b le   1.

 

Features used to distinguish Magenta Lilly Pilly from similar species

 

Feature 

Species 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

(S. paniculatum) 

Brush Cherry 

(S. australe) 

Blue Lilly Pilly  

(S. oleosum) 

Lilly Pilly  

(Acmena smithii) 

Branchlets 

Rounded, smooth, 

green turning brown. 

Four-angled, winged, 

smooth, reddish-

green. 

Rounded, smooth, green, 



often red on upper 

surface. 

Rounded, smooth, 

green turning brown. 

Leaves 

Glossy above, pale and 



dull below. Lanceolate. 

Mid-rib obscurely 

sunken above. 

Scattered, small but 

distinct oil dots. 

Pleasant, vaguely 

citrus-like odour when 

crushed. 

Glossy above, pale 

and dull below. 

Elliptic, bluntly 

pointed. Mid-rib 

obscurely sunken 

above. Scattered, 

small, indistinct oil 

dots. Slight pleasant 

odour when crushed. 

Glossy above, pale 

below. Lanceolate. Mid-

rib obscurely sunken 

above, groove continuing 

down leaf stalk. 

Numerous distinct oil 

dots. Very strong, citrus-

like odour when crushed. 

Sticky oil released. 

Dull dark green 

above, paler below. 

Broadly elliptic to 

narrow-lanceolate. 

Mid-rib clearly sunken 

above. Oil dots 

numerous, distinct. 

Odour weak, slightly 

citrus-like. 

Outer bark 

Pinkish to reddish-

brown, flaky, becoming 

platy. 

Brownish-grey, softly 



scaly. 

Reddish-brown to grey, 

scaly, sheds in narrow 

longitudinal scales. 

Brown, finely scaly. 

Fruit 


Magenta, globose to 

ovoid berry, 12–25 mm 

diameter. Calyx lobes 

formed. Seed solitary, 

polyembryonic (Figure 

1). 


Deep red, oval to 

pear-shaped berry 

15–25 mm long. 

Calyx lobes formed. 

Seed solitary. 

Purplish-blue, globose 

berry 13–40 mm 

diameter. Calyx 

persistent, but not 

forming lobes. Seed 

solitary. 

White or purplish 

globular berry 8–20 

mm diameter. Calyx 

shed. Seed solitary. 

 

3.2 



Distribution 

3.2.1 

Current distribution 

Based upon available information, the known total population of Magenta Lilly Pilly is estimated 

to be approximately 1200 plants that are distributed along a 400 kilometre stretch of coastal 

NSW between Upper Lansdowne in the north to Conjola National Park in the south (Figure 2). 

The species occurs naturally in the Jervis, Sydney Cataract, Pittwater and Wyong subregions of 

the Sydney Basin Bioregion, and in the Karuah-Manning and Macleay-Hastings subregions of 

the NSW North Coast Bioregion (after Commonwealth of Australia 2005). Records from the 

Cumberland subregion of the Sydney Basin Bioregion are discussed below separately.   

Occurrences of Magenta Lilly Pilly are disjunct. Five metapopulations are identified, based on 

the assumption of an approximately 30 kilometre foraging range for the species’ larger potential 

dispersal agents such as the Grey-headed Flying-fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) (Eby 1995; 

Tidemann 1995) and White-headed Pigeon (Columba leucomela) (Payne 1991). The five 

metapopulations are: (i) Jervis Bay; (ii) Coalcliff; (iii) Botany Bay; (iv) Central Coast; and (v) 

Karuah-Manning. These metapopulations consist of 44 known subpopulations, as identified in 

Table 2. Other potential subpopulations have been identified, although these require further 

investigation. This is covered by appropriate actions in Section 6.  

The Jervis Bay and Central Coast metapopulations support the largest number of individuals 

and subpopulations. There are 12 and 24 recorded subpopulations in these metapopulations 

respectively. Up to two-thirds of all individuals of the species occur in three major 

subpopulations of the Central Coast metapopulation. One of these subpopulations is protected 

in Wyrrabalong National Park while the other two, at Ourimbah Creek and Martinsville, occur on 

private property.   

The Coalcliff metapopulation is represented by a single subpopulation of about ten plants (A. 

Bofeldt pers. comm. in Eco Logical Australia 2006). The Botany Bay metapopulation appears to 

support a small number of individuals within three subpopulations (R. Payne pers. comm. in Eco 

Logical Australia 2006; NSW herbarium label information).  



 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   8  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

Fig u re   2.

  Distribution of Magenta Lilly Pilly 

$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

$

T



$

T

$



T

#

S



#

S

#



S

#

S



#

S

#



S

Nowra


Taree

Sydney


Newcastle

Wollongong

Batemans Bay

50

0



50 Kilometres

N

Commonwealth territory



Major road

$

T



Magenta Lilly Pilly sub-population

 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   9  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

The Karuah-Manning metapopulation consists of at least six small subpopulations of 

approximately 20 mature plants (Eco Logical Australia 2006; Atlas of NSW Wildlife 2010; A. 

Paget pers. comm.).  

It is likely that further targeted surveys for the species will reveal additional subpopulations, 

particularly on private property in the hinterland valleys of the Central Coast. Furthermore, a 

thorough assessment of selected subpopulations may improve current population estimates. 

For instance, the Martinsville subpopulation contains a significant number of trees which occur 

sporadically along creek lines on private property (R. Payne pers. comm. in Eco Logical 

Australia 2006). However there are currently no vouchered herbarium or reliable observational 

records for this subpopulation, nor has a thorough survey been undertaken. Likewise, the full 

extent of the sizeable Ourimbah Creek subpopulations have not been ascertained. 

There are historical Magenta Lilly Pilly records from ‘Buladelah’ (1923), ‘Stroud’ (1917), 

‘Blaxland’, (1943), and ‘Kurrajong Heights’ (1953). Although these records are supported by 

herbarium specimens, locations could refer to general localities (for example, ‘Buladelah’ could 

refer to a nearby coastal location) or consist of collections made from cultivated plants. A 

number of early records labelled ‘Gosford’ may refer to legitimate localities, but specific 

locations are unknown due to the use of vague locality descriptions. One 1916 collection from 

‘Hogan’s Brush, Gosford’ refers to what is now known as Strickland State Forest. The species 

has not been recorded from this State Forest since this date, although suitable habitat is 

thought to occur in the area (Binns 1996). 

In recent years, a number of new Magenta Lilly Pilly locations have been recorded in the 

Sydney metropolitan area. For example, 14 new locations were recorded between 2000 and 

2005. Only one record is supported by a specimen lodged with the National Herbarium of NSW, 

and it is unclear whether the record in question relates to a natural occurrence or a planted tree. 

The remaining 13 records appear to have been made by botanical consultants during the 

course of environmental assessment work. Recent attempts at field verifications of similar 

records across new residential areas in the Jervis Bay region have either failed to re-locate 

individuals, or have confirmed that the records in question refer to planted trees (P. Gilmour 

pers. comm. in Eco Logical Australia 2006).  

It is considered likely that a proportion of the Sydney metropolitan records will prove legitimate, 

as small patches of potential habitat can still be found in Sydney (including the littoral rainforest 

at Bundeena and the moist vegetation types on sandy soil in areas such as Balmoral, Pittwater 

and Lane Cove (Benson & Howell 1990)). Any record of an isolated Magenta Lilly Pilly 

individual in the Sydney Metropolitan area should be treated with caution, due to the popularity 

of the species in ornamental plantings (P. Wilson pers. comm. in Eco Logical Australia 2006). 

  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə