National Recovery Plan Magenta Lilly Pilly Syzygium paniculatum



Yüklə 474.07 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/3
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü474.07 Kb.
1   2   3

3.2.2  Historical distribution 

There is little evidence to suggest that the natural range of Magenta Lilly Pilly was historically 

greater than it is today. Herbarium or reliable observational records from localities outside of the 

species’ currently accepted distributional limits are lacking. Notwithstanding this, potential 

habitat exists to the north of the current range of the species, which may support individuals.  

There is evidence to suggest that the abundance of Magenta Lilly Pilly within its natural range 

has been markedly reduced since European settlement, and that a number of subpopulations 

may have been entirely eliminated. For example, there are fewer trees on the Kurnell Peninsula 

today than there were in 1770 when Cook and Solander were reported to have provided an 

abundance of fruits to their fellow explorers (Robinson 1991). Additionally, Mills (1996) 

postulates that Magenta Lilly Pilly was lost from the northern Illawarra as a result of large-scale 

disturbance of local sand dune systems. 

Magenta Lilly Pilly mostly occupies a near-coastal distribution in specific, restricted habitats. 

Much littoral rainforest has been cleared and now exists only in small fragments, many of which 

remain vulnerable to further clearing and modification (Floyd 1990a, 1990b). The clearing of 

valley floor vegetation, including lowland rainforest and riparian gallery forest for agriculture, has 

almost certainly led to a contraction in the area of habitat available to the species, and a 


 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   1 0  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

reduction in species numbers within extant subpopulations. Even where Magenta Lilly Pilly still 

exists in riparian remnants, underscrubbing of habitat and grazing by livestock has reduced the 

ability of the species to regenerate through seedling recruitment (Payne 1991). In more recent 

times, urban expansion has encroached upon agricultural areas, exacerbating habitat loss. 



3.2.3  Land tenure and zoning 

Of the 44 naturally occurring Magenta Lilly Pilly subpopulations currently verified, 18 occur 

partly or wholly within conservation reserves. Sixteen of these are located within a NSW 

national park, nature reserve or state conservation area, and the other two occur within the 

Commonwealth’s Booderee National Park at Jervis Bay. Ten subpopulations occur entirely on 

private property, with the remainder located on other publicly-managed land or straddling public-

private property boundaries. A summary of the general locations and underlying tenures of each 

subpopulation is presented in Table 2.  



3.2.4 

Habitat  

Magenta Lilly Pilly has been reported to occur on sandy soil or stabilised sand dunes in coastal 

areas (Hyland 1983), in littoral rainforest on sand or subtropical rainforest on sandy soil derived 

from sandstone (Floyd 2008), in littoral or subtropical rainforest on sandy soils or stabilised 

Quaternary sand dunes (Quinn et al 1995), or in subtropical and littoral rainforest on sandy soils 

or stabilized dunes near the sea (Wilson 2002).  

The species has been recorded growing mainly on flat to gently sloping sites on floodplains, 

creek banks, perched sand dunes, in swales of hind dunes, and on old dunal ridges. It has also 

been less commonly recorded on steep sites in gullies, such as in Bouddi National Park and at 

Green Point Foreshore Reserve.  

The majority of collection notes for the species describe the soil type as being of a sandy 

nature. It has been recorded on sandy alluvium, deep sands, podsolised quartz sand, 

unconsolidated and permeable deep white-yellow azonal sands, sandstone-derived alluvium, 

deep silty sands (flood deposition), dark heavily littered sand; and sandy grey soil on sandstone. 

Only a few records describe a non-sandy soil type. For example, the Green Point Foreshore 

Reserve subpopulation at Gosford occurs on a deep medium-clay. 

Most Jervis Bay subpopulations occur in littoral rainforest or depauperate subtropical rainforest. 

On Beecroft Peninsula the vegetation is characterised by dominants such as Small-leaved Fig 

(Ficus obliqua), Red Olive Plum (Elaeodendron australe), Plum Pine (Podocarpus elatus) and 

Lilly Pilly. Some sites on Beecroft Peninsula are dominated by Magenta Lilly Pilly, which occurs 

with the abovementioned overstorey species. At St Georges Basin, Magenta Lilly Pilly co-

dominates with Cheese Tree (Glochidion ferdinandi) and Lilly Pilly beneath emergent Blackbutt 

(Eucalyptus pilularis) and Bangalay (E. botryoides), with an understorey including Cabbage 

Palm (Livistona australis)Muttonwood (Myrsine variabilis) and Scentless Rosewood (Synoum 



glandulosum). 

The Coalcliff metapopulation occurs in riverine subtropical rainforest, with associated species 

including Lilly Pilly, Blue Lilly Pilly and Water Gum (Tristaniopsis laurina). 

A number of the Central Coast subpopulations occur in littoral rainforest remnants, which 

sometimes grade into swamp sclerophyll forest where drainage is impeded. Vegetation 

associates in these areas include Blue Lilly Pilly, Hard Quandong (Elaeocarpus obovatus), Lilly 

Pilly, Cabbage Palm, Black Apple (Planchonella australis), Cheese Tree, Tuckeroo 

(Cupaniopsis anacardioides), Port Jackson Fig (Ficus rubiginosa), Broad-leaved Paperbark 

(Melaleuca quinquenervia) and Flax-leaved Paperbark (M. linariifolia). 

 

 



 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   1 1  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

Ta b le   2.

 

Location and tenure summary of Magenta Lilly Pilly populations

 

Metapopulation  Subpopulation  Local 

government 

area 

General location 

Tenure 

Jervis Bay 

Commonwealth 



East St Georges Basin 

Booderee NP 

Commonwealth 



St Georges Head 

Booderee NP 

Shoalhaven 



Tomerong Creek 

Council/private  

Commonwealth 



Duck Hole 

Department of Defence 

Commonwealth 



Target Beach 

Department of Defence 

Commonwealth 



Dart Point 

Department of Defence 

Commonwealth 



Honeymoon Bay 

Department of Defence 

Shoalhaven 



Long Beach North 

Council 


Shoalhaven 

Long Beach South 

Council 


10 

Shoalhaven 

Cabbage Tree 

Council 


11 

Shoalhaven 

Abrahams Bosom 

Crown reserve 

12 

Shoalhaven 



Conjola NP 

Conjola NP 

Coalcliff 

13 


Wollongong 

Coalcliff 

Illawarra Escarpment SCA/ 

private  

Botany Bay 

14 


Sutherland 

Towra Point 

Towra Point NR 

15 


Sutherland 

Captain Cook Drive 

Council 

16 


Sutherland 

Kurnell 


Botany Bay NP 

Central Coast 

17 

Gosford 


Fletcher’s Glen 

Bouddi NP 

18 

Gosford 


Bouddi Grand Deep 

Bouddi NP 

19 

Gosford 


Gosford 

Council/private  

20 

Gosford 


Avoca 

Council/private  

21 

Gosford 


Wamberal Lagoon 

Wamberal Lagoon NR 

22 

Wyong 


Ourimbah Creek 

Private  

23 

Wyong 


Ourimbah Creek, Dog Trap Gully  Private  

24 


Wyong 

Lower Ourimbah Creek 

Private  

25 


Wyong 

Wyong River 

Private  

26 


Wyong 

Wyong River, Deep Creek 

Private  

27 


Wyong 

North Entrance 

Wyrrabalong NP 

28 


Wyong 

Noraville 

Council/private  

29 


Wyong 

Budgewoi 

Council/private  

30 


Wyong 

Munmorah 

Council/private/Munmorah 

SCA 


31 

Lake Macquarie 

Dora Creek 

Private  

32 

Lake Macquarie 



Pulbah Island 

Pulbah Island NR 

33 

Lake Macquarie 



Wallarah – Cams Wharf 

Council/private 

34 

Lake Macquarie 



Wallarah – Nesca Park 

State-owned corporation  

35 

Lake Macquarie 



Wallarah – Swansea 

Council/private  

36 

Lake Macquarie 



Martinsville 

Private  

37 

Lake Macquarie 



Green Point Foreshore Reserve 

Council 


38 

Newcastle 

Glenrock 

Glenrock SCA 

Karuah-Manning  39 

Great Lakes 

Yacaaba Head 

Myall Lakes NP 

40 

Great Lakes 



Mungo Brush 

Myall Lakes NP 

41 

Great Lakes 



Seal Rocks 

Myall Lakes NP 

42 

Great Lakes 



Booti Booti 

Booti Booti NP 

43 

Greater Taree 



Saltwater 

Saltwater NP 

 

44 


Greater Taree 

Upper Lansdowne 

Private 

Note: NP – national park, NR – nature reserve, SCA – state conservation area  



 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   1 2  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

Many of the subpopulations on the Central Coast also occur within riparian forest. The remnant 

gallery rainforest along Ourimbah Creek comprises Jackwood (Cryptocarya glaucescens), Lilly 

Pilly, Sassafras (Doryphora sassafras) and Native Tamarind (Diploglottis cunninghamii). Other 

riparian forest habitat consists of an emergent stratum of eucalypts such as Sydney Blue Gum 

(E. saligna) and Mountain Blue Gum (E. deanei) or Blackbutt overlying a rainforest understorey 

of species such as Lilly Pilly, Brown Myrtle (Choricarpia leptopetala), Coast Canthium 

(Cyclophyllum longipetalum), Blue Lilly Pilly, Lilly Pilly, and Gosford Wattle (Acacia prominens). 

Some Central Coast subpopulations also occur in warm temperate rainforest gullies containing 

Coachwood (Ceratopetalum apetalum), Crabapple (Schizomeria ovata), Ribbonwood 

(Euroschinus falcatus), Guioa (Guioa semiglauca) and Sweet Pittosporum (Pittosporum 



undulatum). 

Most Karuah-Manning subpopulations occur in littoral rainforest. At Elizabeth Beach (Booti Booti 

National Park) the rainforest is part of a remnant, complex mosaic of palm forest, swamp 

sclerophyll forest, and drier coastal scrub. The rainforest is dominated by Yellow Tulipwood 

(Drypetes deplanchei), Hard Quandong and Small-leaved Fig, with Grey Myrtle (Backhousia 

myrtifolia), Myrtle Ebony (Diospyros pentamera) and Big Yellow Wood (Sarcomelicope 

simplicifolia).  

At Seal Rocks the rainforest is dominated by Yellow Tulipwood, Small-leaved Fig, Giant Water 

Gum (Syzygium francisii), Myrtle Ebony, and Coogera (Arytera divaricata). At Upper Lansdowne 

the species occurs in subtropical rainforest with Red Cedar (Toona ciliata), Bangalow Palm 

(Archontophoenix cunninghamiana), Soft Corkwood (Caldcluvia paniculosa), Lilly Pilly and Blue 

Lilly Pilly. 

Thurlby (2010) found that there is extremely low genetic diversity within 11 subpopulations 

sampled across the species range, with a distinct north-south genetic divide centred on the 

Central Coast. Given this, all confirmed naturally occurring populations of Magenta Lilly Pilly are 

considered to be important and, therefore, all habitat in which these populations occur is 

considered to be critical to the survival of the species. 

3.3 

Life history and ecology 

3.3.1  Habit, growth rate and longevity  

Although generally a small tree, individual Magenta Lilly Pilly are known to grow up to 25 m tall 

and 1 m in diameter at breast height (P. Gilmour pers. comm. in Eco Logical Australia 2006). 

The largest specimen known, with a diameter of almost 2 m, was reported from Ourimbah 

Creek (R. Payne pers. comm. in Eco Logical Australia 2006). In some of the more exposed 

sites, the species tends to take the form of a low, coppiced shrub or small tree. 

Large specimens such as those described above are likely to be very old trees. Exactly how old 

is difficult to determine in the absence of site histories. Estimated life expectancy is in the order 

of 75 to 200 years (A. Bofeldt cited in Benson & McDougall 1998). 

3.3.2  Reproductive biology  

As mentioned previously, Magenta Lilly Pilly is polyembryonic, producing up to nine seedlings 

per seed. Recent work by Thurlby (2010) has shown the species to also be facultative 

apomictic; that is, it has the ability to produce fertile seed both sexually (with fertilization) and 

asexually (without fertilization). Where the species is reproducing asexually through apomixis 

(i.e. producing fertile seed without fertilization), offspring are clones of the maternal plant, and 

this can has important implications for conservation of the species.   

Magenta Lilly Pilly has a generalised pollination strategy, exhibiting the ability to self-pollinate 

and to outcross (Payne 1997). Pollination would most likely be aided, both at the local level and 

between subpopulations, by visits to flowers by nectar and pollen-feeding vertebrates and 

invertebrates, such as flying-foxes, possums, honeyeaters, lorikeets, introduced and native 

bees, beetles, moths and butterflies.  



 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   1 3  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

Magenta Lilly Pilly flowers from December to March (occasionally to May) and produces fruits 

from January to May (and sometimes as late as September). Flowering has been observed in 

two pulses in some Central Coast subpopulations (Payne 1997). This flowering pulse may be 

the reason why fruit have been recorded over so many months of the year. 

Fruit production by the species appears to be sporadic (R. Payne pers. comm. in Eco Logical 

Australia 2006) but prolific where it has been observed. The seed is contained within a 

succulent berry, which quickly breaks down after the fruit has ripened (P. Richards pers. comm. 

in Eco Logical Australia 2006). The life expectancy of seed is thought to be less than three 

months (A. Bofeldt cited in Benson & McDougall 1998). It is therefore unlikely that Magenta Lilly 

Pilly populations support lasting soil seed banks. 

Dispersal of seeds is likely to be achieved through several agents. Water would disperse fruits 

in riparian habitats subjected to periodic flooding, such as Ourimbah Creek and Martinsville. 

Gravity and animals which feed on the fruits of the species are also likely agents. The White-

headed Pigeon (Payne 1991), Pied Currawong (Strepera graculina) (Buchanan 1989) and 

Grey-headed Flying Fox (Eby 1995) have all been recorded feeding on the fruit of Magenta Lilly 

Pilly, and it is likely that other fruit-eating birds and small native mammals also consume the fruit 

(Payne 1997). 

Floyd (2008) reports ready and rapid germination of seed within 20 days. Payne (1997) found 

that the species prefers canopy cover for in situ seed germination due to the greater availability 

of moisture under closed canopy conditions. However, seedlings emerging under adult trees are 

thought to be short lived (Benson & McDougall 1998). Like many rainforest species, seedling 

progression may require a disturbance event, such as a tree fall or storm, which opens up the 

canopy. 

3.3.3 

Population genetics 

Thurlby (2010) found that there is extremely low genetic diversity within 11 subpopulations 

sampled across the species range. It was also found that, between subpopulations, there is a 

distinct north-south genetic divide centred on the Central Coast somewhere near Cams Wharf 

and Green Point.  

In evolutionary terms, this divide suggests two main genetic units as opposed to the five 

metapopulations identified on a purely geographic basis. Subpopulations sampled north of this 

divide exhibit a higher level of genetic diversity than those that were sampled south of the 

divide. In the case of these southern subpopulations, there was virtually zero genetic diversity 

between them. Therefore, when referring to metapopulations and subpopulations in this 

recovery plan, it should be taken to mean geographically distinct populations unless otherwise 

stated. 


3.3.4 

Disturbance ecology 

Fire may be a regenerative mechanism in some Magenta Lilly Pilly subpopulations, with Payne 

(1991) observing coppicing from the bases of burnt-out main trunks of trees at North Entrance. 

It appears that wildfires can also kill trees (R. Payne cited in Benson & McDougall 1998), so it is 

possible that only fires of low intensities induce coppicing. This response to fire is similar to that 

exhibited by other species occupying drier sites and into which fire may occasionally encroach, 

such as Grey Myrtle and Lilly Pilly. It is considered that Magenta Lilly Pilly would not tolerate a 

frequent fire regime. Magenta Lilly Pilly is also thought to tolerate a certain amount of inundation 

(Payne 1991). 

3.3.5 

Cultivation  

Magenta Lilly Pilly is widely cultivated in eastern Australia as an ornamental garden plant 

(Nicholson & Nicholson 1994; Wrigley & Fagg 1996; Floyd 2008). The species is widely used in 

planting schemes in many areas along the NSW coast and is known by such common names 

as Magenta Cherry, Pocketless Brush Cherry, Brush Cherry, Scrub Cherry, and Creek Lilly Pilly. 

A range of horticultural varieties have been developed by the nursery industry, and a number of 



 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   1 4  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

registered names exist, including ‘Lillyput’, ‘Undercover’, ‘Little Lil’, ‘Orange Twist’, ‘Beachball’, 

and ‘Variegata’.  

4. 

Th re a ts   a n d   Ma n a g e m e n t  Is s u e s    



4.1 

Current threats 

Magenta Lilly Pilly subpopulations are subject to a number of active threatening processes. The 

major threats are as follows:  

4.1.1 

Habitat clearing and fragmentation  

Clearing can directly destroy individuals and their habitat. It can also lead to degradation of 

habitat through the disruption of ecosystem processes and through the exposure of remnants to 

potentially damaging agents (including strong and drying winds, high temperatures, direct and 

prolonged solar radiation, chemical drift, pests, weeds, and diseases). Degradation can also 

occur through the altering of the composition and structure of remnants (the latter a direct 

consequence of increased edge effects). 

Habitat likely to support Magenta Lilly Pilly continues to be cleared for urban expansion and 

infrastructure development. This is particularly evident in the Central Coast and Jervis Bay 

regions, where residential and associated developments have expanded rapidly in recent years. 

A golf course complex has recently been constructed adjacent to the largest known 

subpopulation at North Entrance (Central Coast metapopulation). It is unclear at this stage what 

effects this development may have on the subpopulation, in terms of altering local hydrological 

regimes (runoff and water use), increasing vulnerability to weed infestations, and increasing 

exposure to fertilizer and pesticide drifts. Other habitat losses are threatened by highway 

expansion and car park encroachments into habitat. 



4.1.2 

Low genetic diversity 

So far, Magenta Lilly Pilly has persisted in the wild with low genetic variation. However, this low 

variation, (particularly for those subpopulations south of the Central Coast) may have long term 

conservation implications for the species. Persistence of the species in the current environment 

is likely due to the prolific reproduction afforded through polyembryony, as well as the fitness of 

existing genotypes to the current environment (Thurlby 2010). This low genetic diversity means 

that the species may have difficult adapting to future environmental change. 

4.1.3 

Inappropriate grazing regimes 

The grazing and watering of livestock within riparian areas is contributing to a decline in some of 

the largest subpopulations along Ourimbah Creek and along watercourses in the Martinsville 

area. Although many Magenta Lilly Pilly individuals are present in both areas, there is little or no 

evidence of recruitment at either location due to the effects of trampling by livestock (R. Payne 

pers. comm. in Eco Logical Australia 2006). 

Grazing, including physical damage to the understorey, has been identified as a threat to the 

rainforest habitat of Magenta Lilly Pilly in NSW (NSW Scientific Committee 2004; DEWHA 

2009). 

4.1.4 

Weed infestations 

Weeds are a threat to Magenta Lilly Pilly in that they can compete with the species for water, 

nutrients and sunlight. Weeds can also suppress or prevent the early growth and development 

of other rainforest species, alter nutrient cycles, increase the risk and intensity of fires, and 

physically damage plants. In addition, weed infestation can severely reduce the areas available 

for regeneration.   



 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   1 5  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

Numerous weeds have been identified as posing a threat to Magenta Lilly Pilly or its habitat 

(see NSW Scientific Committee 2004; Threatened Species Scientific Committee 2008). In 

particular, Lantana (Lantana camara) and Bitou Bush (Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. 

rotundata) have been identified as a direct threat (Coutts-Smith & Downey 2006; DEC 2006; 

National Lantana Management Group 2010).  

Subpopulations in Wyrrabalong National Park, Bouddi National Park and Wamberal Lagoon 

Nature Reserve have been threatened by infestations of Lantana and Bitou Bush. Those at  

Green Point Foreshore Reserve and Swansea have been impacted upon by Lantana, Bitou 

Bush and Morning Glory (Ipomoea indica). Other littoral rainforest remnants on private property 

and council-managed lands near Lake Macquarie have been threatened by Small-leaved Privet 

(Ligustrum sinense) and Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica). All of these sites have 

active weed management programs in place. The small Jervis Bay subpopulation at Abrahams 

Bosom is currently infested with Asparagus Fern (Asparagus aethiopicus). 



4.1.5 

Inappropriate fire regimes 

Magenta Lilly Pilly has been known to coppice after low intensity fire (Payne 1991). Fires 

occurring at frequencies or intensities that are too high for the species to tolerate, however, 

have the potential to kill or weaken plants, interfere with their reproductive mechanisms, and 

alter or destroy rainforest habitat. Fire may also encourage weed invasions along remnant 

edges. 


A number of subpopulations of the species are potentially threatened by high frequency fire. 

Although habitat is generally located in areas where a degree of fire protection is afforded, 

some patches, such as at Honeymoon Bay, Long Beach, and Duck Hole on Beecroft Peninsula 

are potentially at risk from wildfires originating from nearby campsites or resulting from military 

training exercises. However, Littoral rainforest on Beecroft Peninsula is excluded from hazard 

reduction burning, and there have been no wildfires through the rainforest since the late 1940s 

to early 1950s (M. Armstrong pers. comm.). 

Habitat of several subpopulations on the Central Coast has been subjected to regular fires. For 

example, approximately 33 fires were recorded in Bouddi National Park between 1968 and 

1990 (McRae 1990), although there is no indication that Magenta Lilly Pilly individuals were 

directly affected. The North Entrance area, however, has been subjected to wildfire that has 

directly impacted upon the Magenta Lilly Pilly subpopulation, resulting in the death of 35 

individuals (Benson & McDougall 1998). 

Inappropriate fire regimes are recognised as posing a threat to the margins of littoral rainforest, 

which provides much of the habitat for Magenta Lilly Pilly (NSW Scientific Committee 2004; 

Threatened Species Scientific Committee 2008). 



4.1.6 

Climate change 

Steffen et al. (2009) reports that predicting the future effects of climate change on biodiversity in 

Australia is complicated. Even so, rainforests and coastal ecosystems of NSW have been 

identified as being particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change (NSW Inter-agency 

Biodiversity and Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Working Group 2007), both of which 

constitute Magenta Lilly Pilly habitat.  

Although climate change impacts on the species itself are difficult to predict, impacts on habitat 

through such things as sea level rise, increased storm events and altered fresh-saline hydrology 

are possible. For example, the subpopulation at Towra Point is situated near the extreme high 

water mark and may be at risk from sea level rise (NSW Scientific Committee 2009). Climate 

change may also exacerbate existing threats such as altered fire regimes and potential new 

weed threats. Human adaptive responses to things such as sea level rise may also add further 

pressure on the species and its habitat. The effects of any future environmental change will be 

exacerbated by the low level of genetic diversity exhibited in the species. 



 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   1 6  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

For a general overview on possible impacts on ecosystems that may contain Magenta Lilly Pilly 

see NSW Inter-agency Biodiversity and Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Working 

Group (2007), DECC (2008a, 2008b, 2008c), DECCW (2009) and Steffen et al. (2009). 

4.1.7 

Introduced vertebrate pests 

Introduced vertebrate pests such as feral deer can impact upon Magenta Lilly Pilly and its 

habitat. Feral deer are known to occur in many conservation reserves, including Bouddi 

National Park and Illawarra Escarpment State Conservation Area (NSW Scientific Committee 

2005). 

An exclosure experiment using planted saplings of Magenta Lilly Pilly found that exposure to 



browsing by the Javan Rusa Deer (Cervus timorensis) for several months led to major 

defoliation, bark stripping, stem breakages and some mortality (Keith & Pellow 2004 cited in 

NSW Scientific Committee 2005). In addition to browsing and physical disturbance of 

individuals, deer browse and disturb the seedlings of other species which collectively constitute 

Magenta Lilly Pilly habitat. The NSW Scientific Committee (2005) reports that grazing and 

trampling by deer could alter the composition and structure of littoral rainforest habitat of 

Magenta Lilly Pilly. 

4.1.8 

Recreational activities  

Some subpopulations of Magenta Lilly Pilly are subjected to frequent human visitation, and are 

threatened by the construction and maintenance of roads, walking tracks and car parks. For 

instance, bush camping at Honeymoon Bay on Beecroft Peninsula occurs adjacent to a patch of 

rainforest which contains Magenta Lilly Pilly. The picnic and recreation areas at the St Georges 

Basin and Abrahams Bosom sites are used regularly, with visitors passing through the habitat of 

the species (both sites have car parks within Magenta Lilly Pilly habitat). The Elizabeth Beach 

subpopulation occurs adjacent to a walking track to the beach. Human visitation may impact 

upon the ability of a species to regenerate, as trampling of the understorey and soil compaction 

can inhibit seedling establishment. 



4.1.9 

Pathogens 

Myrtle Rust (Uredo rangelii) is a pathogen that affects species from the family Myrtaceae that 

was first detected in Australia on the NSW Central Coast in 2010. The rust is now considered to 

be widespread along the eastern seaboard (Industry & Investment NSW 2011a) and Magenta 

Lilly Pilly has been identified as a known host in the field (Industry & Investment NSW 2011b), 

along with several other Myrtaceae species occurring in the same habitat.   

The entire distribution of Magenta Lilly Pilly occurs within the known or predicted distribution of 

Myrtle Rust in NSW. Although its effects on most Australian Myrtaceae species are unknown 

(Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry 2010), Myrtle Rust is closely related to 

Eucalypt/Guava Rust (Puccina psidii), a serious disease of Australian Myrtaceae growing in 

North America and South America (Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service 2009).  

4.1.10  Changes to local water regimes through water extraction 

A proposal to temporarily supplement the Central Coast’s water supply by pumping up to four 

million litres per day from Ourimbah Creek was recently approved by the NSW Government. 

This proposal may have significant consequences for the Ourimbah Creek subpopulations. 

Such a draw down on Ourimbah Creek may lead to a reduction in the frequency of flood events 

and a drop in the water table, with the likely result being a loss of remnant riparian vegetation 

along much of the creek’s middle and lower reaches.   

4.2 

Ability of species to recover 

To ensure recovery of Magenta Lilly Pilly, this recovery plan advocates recovery actions that 

favour in situ management in the short to medium term. Magenta Lilly Pilly is primarily a species  


 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   1 7  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

of littoral and gallery rainforests, which are themselves under considerable pressure. Large 

areas have been lost to rural and urban development and the amount of habitat available to the 

species is being further limited. In addition, the ability of the species to naturally recolonise 

potential habitat where it does occur is often restricted by land management practices. The lack 

of recruitment in several subpopulations is a concern and is likely to have an impact upon the 

ability of the species to persist in some areas. Subpopulations are widespread, with a large 

number occurring on public lands. The probability of random events eliminating the entire 

species is therefore reduced.  

The research of Thurlby (2010) on the reproductive biology and conservation genetics of 

Magenta Lilly Pilly has several implications for the long term management of the species. 

Reproduction by facultative apomixis, low genetic diversity within existing populations and the 

genetic divide between north and south populations suggest that all subpopulations of the 

species are equally important. All existing subpopulations and the full range of genetic diversity 

they contain should be afforded equal protection. 

In the long term, ex situ forms of conservation may be required if the species fails to adapt to 

environmental change, particularly if the ability to adapt to a changing environment is 

exacerbated by other threats such as weeds or Myrtle Rust. This makes ex situ conservation a 

long term priority for the species’ persistence and, as a consequence, associated contingency 

planning for such a situation should be an important short term consideration.   

All forms of in situ and ex situ conservation must take into account the widespread horticultural 

use of the species in landscape and garden plantings.  As many of these are hybrids or of 

unknown genetic origin, they should be excluded from all actions related to the conservation of 

the species in the wild. 

5. 


P re vio u s   Re c o ve ry  Ac tio n s  

5.1 

Status review 

The TSC Act status of Magenta Lilly Pilly was reviewed in 2009 (NSW Scientific Committee 

2009). As a result of this review, the status of the species on the TSC Act was changed from 

vulnerable to endangered. This was due to the restricted area and small sizes of its 

subpopulations, indicating that the species is undergoing a continuing decline, or likely to 

undergo a future decline in abundance, and in habitat area and quality. 



5.2 

Research 

Research into the reproductive biology and genetic diversity of Magenta Lilly Pilly was 

undertaken in 2010 (Thurlby 2010; Thurlby et al. 2011). Key findings of this research have been 

reported in Sections 3.4 and 4.1 and are being used to inform management actions identified in 

this recovery plan. 

Research has also been undertaken into the suitability of Magenta Lilly Pilly seed for long term 

storage. As part of the Rainforest Seed Project, the Botanic Gardens Trust tested seed for 

tolerance to the drying that occurs for long term storage of seeds in conventional seedbanks. 

The project found that Magenta Lilly Pilly seed was not tolerant to desiccation and, therefore, 

cannot be seedbanked (K. Hamilton pers. com.).  



5.3 

Management planning 

Plans of management have been prepared for the majority of the NSW conservation reserves 

where Magenta Lilly Pilly is known to occur. These include Booti Booti National Park, Botany 

Bay National Park, Conjola National Park, Glenrock State Conservation Area, Munmorah State 

Conservation Area, Myall Lakes National Park, Pulbah Island Nature Reserve, Towra Point 

Nature Reserve, Wamberal Lagoon Nature Reserve and Wyrrabalong National Park (draft 

plan). Booderee National Park has an approved Australian Government management plan and 


 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   1 8  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

is jointly managed by the Wreck Bay Aboriginal Community Council and the Australian 

Government.  

The natural range of Magenta Lilly Pilly is covered by the Hunter-Central Rivers, Sydney 

Metropolitan, Southern Rivers and, potentially, Hawkesbury-Nepean catchment management 

authorities (CMAs). These CMAs operate under catchment action plans to coordinate and guide 

natural resource management and investment across their respective regions. The catchment 

action plan of each of these CMAs identifies targets that relate to biodiversity and threatened 

species management. 



5.4 

Surveys and mapping 

Magenta Lilly Pilly populations and habitat have been identified, surveyed and mapped under 

various projects. Examples include: 

 



The Distribution and Reproductive Ecology of Syzygium paniculatum and Syzygium 

australe (Myrtaceae) in the Gosford-Wyong Region

 

(Payne 1997) which, amongst other 



things, determined the extent and distribution of Magenta Lilly Pilly on the NSW Central 

Coast.


 

 



Magenta Lilly Pilly Syzygium paniculatum -Collation of Information for the Preparation 

of a Recovery Plan (Eco Logical Australia 2006), a report initiated to undertake 

collation and validation of information and records to facilitate preparation of this plan.   

 

State Environmental Planning Policy 26 Littoral Rainforest (SEPP 26), which maps 



important littoral rainforest stands along the NSW coast. This mapping is not definitive, 

however, and stands occur at locations not mapped under this SEPP (NSW Scientific 

Committee 2004). 

Populations and habitat have also been identified, surveyed and mapped as part of various 

national park and state forest planning processes. During preparation of this plan, potential new 

sites and unconfirmed records have been discovered. The ongoing implementation of the plan 

will involve investigating the reliability of these and incorporating them into management actions 

where appropriate. 



5.5 

Habitat protection and management 

Private native forest harvesting operations across the natural range of Magenta Lilly Pilly in 

NSW require approval in the form of a property vegetation plan, and must comply, or become 

compliant with, one of two codes of practice – the Private Native Forestry Code of Practice for 



Northern NSW or the Private Native Forestry Code of Practice for Southern NSW. These codes 

specify that all Magenta Lilly Pilly individuals in northern and southern NSW are to be protected 

during private native forest operations. The codes also specify that forest operations, excepting 

the maintenance of existing roads, must not occur within rainforest, although this does not apply 

to isolated clumps or linear strips of rainforest less than 0.5 hectares in size. 

5.6 

Weed management 

Weed management in known and potential Magenta Lilly Pilly habitat is undertaken on public 

lands as a component of general or specific public land management programs by state 

government agencies, local councils and community-based organisations. For example, in 

2005, eight Landcare groups were actively restoring and managing rainforest in the Lake 

Macquarie area. Private landholders are also involved in weed management activities in 

suitable habitat, often as a legislative requirement or through funded programs. 

The NSW Bitou Bush Threat Abatement Plan (DEC 2006) and the Plan to Protect 



Environmental Assets from Lantana (National Lantana Management Group 2010) each 

identifies sites for weed control where Magenta Lilly Pilly is present. Appendix 1 lists the priority 

sites where Magenta Lilly Pilly is present. There is also a process underway in NSW to develop 

control priorities for widespread weeds at a CMA level so that management programs can target 

those areas where control will result in the best outcome for biodiversity.  


 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   1 9  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 



5.7 

Fire management 

In NSW fire management strategies have been prepared for Booti Booti National Park, Botany 

Bay National Park, Bouddi National Park, Conjola National Park, Glenrock State Conservation 

Area, Illawarra Escarpment State Conservation Area, Munmorah State Conservation Area, 

Myall Lakes National Park, Pulbah Island Nature Reserve, Saltwater National Park, Wamberal 

Lagoon Nature Reserve and Wyrrabalong National Park. A fire management plan also exists for 

the Royal Australian Navy Weapons Range at Beecroft Peninsula (M. Armstrong pers. comm.).  

Magenta Lilly Pilly is listed on the NSW threatened species hazard reduction list under the Bush 

Fire Environmental Assessment Code (Rural Fire Service 2006). Under this Code, bush fire 

hazard reduction works at sites where Magenta Lilly Pilly is present must be consistent with the 

relevant conditions identified in hazard reduction list.  

5.8 

Pathogens 

The management of Myrtle Rust in NSW is overseen by Department of Primary Industries. The 

role of managing the effects of the rust on threatened Myrtaceae occurring in OEH estate is the 

responsibility of OEH, which has prepared a Myrtle Rust management plan to try and minimise 

the impact of the pathogen on conservation reserves (OEH 2011). 

6. 


P ro p o s e d   Re c o ve ry  Ob je c tive s ,  Ac tio n s   a n d  

P e rfo rm a n c e   Crite ria   

The overall objective of this recovery plan is to protect known subpopulations of Magenta Lilly 

Pilly from decline and to ensure that wild populations of the species remain viable in the long 

term. 

Specific objectives of the recovery plan are listed below. For each of these objectives a number 



of recovery actions have been identified, each with its own performance criterion. 

6.1 

Coordination of recovery efforts 

Objective 1: To ensure a coordinated and efficient approach to the implementation of 

recovery efforts. 

Action 1.1: OEH will coordinate the implementation of the actions outlined in this recovery plan. 

A coordinated approach is essential for overseeing and assisting in the implementation of the 

recovery actions outlined in this plan, in a timely, cost-effective and efficient manner. 

Coordination will be effected through the incorporation of recovery actions into the Priorities 

Action Statement as well as other suitable programs.  

Performance criterion: OEH has coordinated the recovery actions outlined in this recovery 

plan for the life of the plan.  



6.2 

Targeted survey 

Objective 2: To establish the full extent of the distribution of Magenta Lilly Pilly 

Action 2.1: OEH will support targeted surveys for Magenta Lilly Pilly. 

The current known distribution of Magenta Lilly Pilly is detailed in Section 3.2. OEH will support 

targeted surveys in suitable habitat to determine whether additional subpopulations of the 

species exist. The following are priorities for additional survey work: 

 

areas to the north of Port Stephens 



 

areas in the vicinity of Martinsville and Watagans National Park 



 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   2 0  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

 

sections of Strickland State Forest, Ourimbah State Forest and Jilliby State 



Conservation Area  

 



the Illawarra 

 



areas of Conjola National Park and Booderee National Park 

 



sites across the Sydney metropolitan area. 

Surveys are also required to determine the size, structure, and localised extent of known 

subpopulations. The following subpopulations are priorities:  

 



the larger Central Coast subpopulations in the vicinity of Ourimbah Creek and 

Martinsville.  In particular, the long-term effects of water extraction on the Ourimbah 

Creek  subpopulations are unknown and any surveys or monitoring for this 

subpopulation should be supported (also see Action 5.1). 

 

Coalcliff 



 

the Jervis Bay subpopulations at Tomerong Creek and in Conjola National Park 



 

known localities in the Sydney metropolitan area.  



Samples of new subpopulations of the species will be collected for lodgement with herbaria. 

Records of new subpopulations will be entered into the Atlas of NSW Wildlife. 



Performance criterion: Proposals to develop and conduct targeted surveys in priority areas of 

known and potential habitat of Magenta Lilly Pilly have been supported over the life of the 

recovery plan.

  

6.3 



Research 

Objective 3: To increase the understanding of Magenta Lilly Pilly biology and ecology 

Action 3.1: OEH will support research into aspects of the biology and ecology of Magenta Lilly 

Pilly. 

Although some research has been conducted into aspects of genetic structure, reproductive 

biology and seed storage potential, there is a need for further research on Magenta Lilly Pilly to 

guide both in situ and ex situ management. Research should target the following priorities: 

 

assess the impact of Myrtle Rust on Magenta Lilly Pilly in the wild and investigate the 



effectiveness of various treatment options (as part of broader research into impacts 

and treatment of Myrtaceae species in general). This should not be limited to the direct 

effects of Myrtle Rust on the species itself but, also, the potential effects of rust on the 

viability of its broader habitat. 

 

undertake further genotyping of offspring using a larger sample size and greater 



number of subpopulations 

 



determine if viable forms of ex situ germplasm storage exist 

 



determine the species’ effective population size 

 



investigate the species response to potential climate change across its genetic and 

geographical range 

 

investigate the species response to disturbance, including fire. 



Performance criteria: Research on Magenta Lilly Pilly is initiated over the life of the plan, and 

research outcomes are used to improve in situ and ex situ management of the species.

 

6.4 

Habitat and threat management 

Objective 4: To minimise the decline of Magenta Lilly Pilly through in situ habitat 

protection and management 

Action 4.1: OEH will continue to implement on-ground management of Magenta Lilly Pilly and its 

habitat on OEH estate, and will negotiate with relevant land managers to ameliorate threats to 

Magenta Lilly Pilly on other public lands. 


 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   2 1  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

Weeds, fire, infrastructure construction and maintenance, and other threats are impacting upon 

Magenta Lilly Pilly subpopulations and habitat on public lands. OEH and other public land 

managers already undertake management to protect the species. OEH will continue to do so on 

its estate through existing plans and programs.  

Ameliorative measures on other public land will also be encouraged. OEH will negotiate with 

relevant land managers, with the aim of implementing actions or modifying existing site 

management arrangements. 

Some site-specific actions that have been identified are: 

 

control of Bitou Bush and Lantana at priority sites that contain Magenta Lilly Pilly 



(Appendix 1) 

 



relocation of a car park at St Georges Basin and regeneration of original Magenta Lilly 

Pilly habitat; 

 

protection of the Green Point Foreshore Reserve subpopulation from fire; 



 

relocation or modification and fencing off of a car park at Abrahams Bosom Reserve; 



 

control of Asparagus Fern at Abrahams Bosom Reserve; and 



 

modification of maintenance activities at Cams Wharf and Nesca Park to create 



favourable conditions for natural regeneration of Magenta Lilly Pilly habitat. 

Depending on the outcomes of negotiations, project proposals may be developed for each of 

the activities identified above. 

Performance criteria: OEH has continued to implement on-ground management on OEH 

estate over the life of the recovery plan and has negotiated ameliorative measures with relevant 

public land managers over the life of the recovery plan.  

Action 4.2:  OEH  will support funding applications for restorative and management activities in 

known and potential Magenta Lilly Pilly habitats on private land.   

Weed invasions, inappropriate fire and grazing regimes, and introduced vertebrate pests are 

impacting on a number of known and potential Magenta Lilly Pilly habitats on private lands.  

OEH will encourage the restoration and ongoing management of suitable habitats by supporting 

funding applications for on-ground works including littoral rainforest expansion and 

rehabilitation, fire management, protection from domestic stock and vertebrate pest control.  



Performance criterion: Funding applications are supported for private land activities over the 

life of the recovery plan. 



Action 4.3: OEH will investigate the benefits and feasibility of incorporating subpopulations of 

Magenta Lilly Pilly adjoining conservation reserves into those reserves.  

The Coalcliff and Munmorah subpopulations of Magenta Lilly Pilly occur across council, private 

property and conservation reserve boundaries. OEH will investigate whether there would be a 

benefit to extend the southern boundary of Munmorah State Conservation Area and whether it 

would be feasible. This will only be undertaken with agreement of Wyong Shire Council and all 

affected private landholders. Similarly, OEH will investigate the potential benefit and feasibility of 

incorporating the Coalcliff subpopulation, with the full agreement of all affected landholders, into 

the Illawarra Escarpment State Conservation Area. 



Performance criterion: OEH has investigated the benefits and feasibility of incorporating the 

entire Munmorah and Coalcliff subpopulations of Magenta Lilly Pilly into adjacent conservation 

reserves.  

6.5 

Disease and pathogens 

Objective 5: To reduce impacts of Myrtle Rust on Magenta Lilly Pilly and its habitat. 

Action  5.1:  OEH  will continue to manage the effects of Myrtle Rust on Magenta Lilly Pilly on 

OEH estate via the Management Plan for Myrtle Rust on National Parks Estate (OEH 2011). For 

sites that are not on OEH estate, OEH will liaise with land managers using the Management 


 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   2 2  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

Plan for Myrtle Rust as a guide. This should include liaison with the Australian Government over 

sites on Commonwealth land via the National Myrtle Rust Coordination Group 

The OEH Management Plan for Myrtle Rust will be used to undertake management of Myrtle 

Rust impacts on priority Magenta Lilly Pilly subpopulations and sites on OEH estate. Where 

Magenta Lilly Pilly occurs outside OEH estate, OEH will assist with prioritising and managing 

subpopulations and sites using the Management Plan for Myrtle Rust as a guide.  Other threats 

should also be considered when undertaking prioritisation for subpopulations (e.g. the unknown 

effects of water extraction on the Ourimbah Creek subpopulations). 

Ex situ conservation actions identified in Section 6.6 will also have a role in protecting Magenta 

Lilly Pilly from Myrtle Rust. 

Performance criteria: OEH has identified priority sites for monitoring within six months of 

commencement of the recovery plan, has undertaken management if required, and has 

monitored the effectiveness of treatment throughout the life of the recovery plan. 

Action 5.2: Magenta Lilly Pilly sites on Commonwealth land will be monitored for signs of Myrtle 

Rust and potential management coordinated via the appropriate agency in consultation with the 

National Myrtle Rust Coordination Group. 

A National Myrtle Rust Coordination Group has been established, chaired by the 

Commonwealth with technical and policy support by state and territory agencies. The Group is 

coordinating ongoing actions to respond to Myrtle Rust focusing on mitigating its impact on the 

natural environment, including threatened and endangered species, and on industries that rely 

on myrtaceous species (DSEWPaC 2011).  

Where metapopulations of Magenta Lilly Pilly occur across NSW and Commonwealth 

boundaries, coordination of prioritisation and management can be undertaken as a single unit 

via the National Myrtle Rust Coordination Group. 

Performance criteria: Monitoring for Myrtle Rust on Commonwealth land has been undertaken 

within six months of commencement of the recovery plan and any required management has 

been coordinated across the metapopulation via the National Myrtle Rust Coordination Group 

throughout the life of the recovery plan. 



6.6 

Ex situ conservation 

Objective 6: To maintain a representative ex situ collection of Magenta Lilly Pilly 

Action  6.1:  OEH will ensure there is an ex situ collection of representative  wild populations 

maintained in appropriate botanic gardens. 

Magenta Lilly Pilly is already in cultivation in botanic gardens located at Adelaide, Canberra, 

Sydney, Melbourne, Coffs Harbour, Toowoomba and Mount Annan (Quinn et al. 1995). A check 

is required to determine if collections represent wild plants of known provenance. It would be 

desirable to have unrepresented populations established. Given potential climate change, long 

term consideration should be given to those subpopulations most under threat from climate 

change, although any prioritisation for ex situ establishment should not ignore other, more 

immediate threats such as Myrtle Rust. 

Magenta Lilly Pilly seed is intolerant to desiccation and unsuitable for storage in conventional 

seedbanks such as the NSW Seedbank. Ex situ conservation, therefore, is limited to tree 

collections, although alternative technologies for the long term ex situ storage of germplasm are 

to be investigated as part of the Rainforest Seed Project at Mt Annan (K. Hamilton pers. com.).  



Performance criteria: The source of all ex situ collections has been established and 

unrepresented subpopulations identified within a year of the commencement of the plan. Ex situ 

populations are maintained in appropriate botanic gardens on an ongoing basis.   


 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   2 3  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 



6.7 

Community liaison, education, awareness and involvement 

Objective 7: To raise awareness of the conservation significance of Magenta Lilly Pilly 

and involve the broader community in the recovery program 

Action  7.1:  OEH  will liaise with landholders and land managers to convey the conservation 

significance of Magenta Lilly Pilly and its habitat on or adjacent to their properties. This includes 

ensuring landholders  and managers are aware of voluntary protection measures and 

conservation incentive schemes available to help protect and manage the species and its 

habitat. 

OEH will seek to secure sympathetic management of Magenta Lilly Pilly habitat from private 

landholders, although the nature of these arrangements will depend on the circumstances and 

cooperation of individual landholders. Liaison will commence in the first year of implementation 

of the recovery plan and continue throughout the life of the plan. Local councils will be informed 

of any management agreements for entry into their property information systems. 

A number of mechanisms are available to help protect Magenta Lilly Pilly and its habitat, 

including: 

 

appropriate zonings under local environmental plans 



 

property vegetation plans under the Native Vegetation Act 2003 



 

conservation agreements and wildlife refuges under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 



1974 

 



joint management agreements under the TSC Act 

 



Nature Conservation Trust agreements negotiated under the Nature Conservation 

Trust Act 2001

Performance criterion: Landholders and land managers are aware of the conservation 

significance of Magenta Lilly Pilly and its habitat and appropriate mechanisms for the 

conservation of the species and its habitat are sought over the life of the plan. 

Action 7.2: OEH will update and maintain information requirements for Magenta Lilly Pilly. 

OEH will update the information available to the public for Magenta Lilly Pilly to provide current 

information on the species. OEH will also update and maintain data associated with the species 

that is utilised by tools such as the BioBanking and Native Vegetation assessment tools

.

 

Performance criterion: Information requirements for Magenta Lilly Pilly are updated and 



maintained over the life of this recovery plan. 

Action  7.3:  OEH  will  engage  with relevant Local Aboriginal Land Councils and Aboriginal 

communities when undertaking recovery actions on sites of cultural significance. 

Magenta Lilly Pilly occurs in a number of areas of cultural significance to Aboriginal people. 

Prior to the commencement of on-ground recovery actions in such areas, OEH will seek to 

engage Local Aboriginal Land Councils and Aboriginal communities to identify any issues that 

may be of concern to Aboriginal people and to seek opportunities for involvement in the 

recovery actions. 



Performance criterion: The engagement of relevant Local Aboriginal Land Councils and 

Aboriginal communities is sought prior to the implementation of on-ground recovery actions in 

areas of cultural significance to Aboriginal people throughout the life of the plan.  

7. 


Im p le m e n ta tio n  

Implementation of recovery actions specified in this recovery plan for the period of five years 

from publication are the responsibility of OEH and the Australian Government.  


 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   2 4  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

8. 

S o c ia l  a n d   Ec o n o m ic   Co n s e q u e n c e s  



The total cost of implementing the recovery actions is estimated to be $460 500 over the five-

year period of the plan (Table 3). Some savings may be made where costs are split between 

Magenta Lilly Pilly recovery and other programs or where actions costed for contingency 

purposes might not required (e.g. management for Myrtle Rust in some subpopulations). 

It is anticipated that there will be no significant adverse social or economic consequences 

associated with the implementation of this recovery plan, and the overall benefits to society 

resulting from its implementation will outweigh any potential negative consequences.  

The costs required to maintain Magenta Lilly Pilly as part of Australia’s natural heritage are 

small compared to the scientific, cultural and biodiversity values of the species. Increased 

community awareness will enhance the profile of threatened species in general. This in turn will 

lead to greater opportunities for conserving biodiversity across NSW and Australia. 

9. 


Ro le   a n d   In te re s ts   o f  In d ig e n o u s   P e o p le  

Magenta Lilly Pilly occurs along a 400 kilometre stretch of the east coast of Australia. Within this 

area, the interests of Indigenous people are represented by numerous groups and individuals. 

Implementation of actions within this recovery plan will need to consider the roles and interests 

of these groups and individuals on a case-by-case basis.  Action 7.3 will require the 

engagement of relevant Local Aboriginal Land Councils and Aboriginal communities prior to the 

implementation of on-ground recovery actions in areas managed by Aboriginal communities or 

areas of cultural significance to Aboriginal people throughout the life of the plan.  

10. 

Be n e fits   to   o th e r  s p e c ie s /e c o lo g ic a l  c o m m u n itie s  



Implementation of the actions of this plan will assist in the conservation of the general biodiversity 

that share Magenta Lilly Pilly habitat. In particular, Littoral Rainforest and Coastal Vine Thickets of 

Eastern Australia is listed as a critically endangered ecological community on the EPBC Act and 

actions undertaken to conserve Magenta Lilly Pilly will assist in conserving this ecological community 

where they co-occur. 

11. 


P re p a ra tio n   De ta ils  

This recovery plan was prepared by Ian Hanson, Ian Wilkinson, Shane Ruming and Katrina 

McKay, with assistance from Peter Richards and Phil Gilmour. 

12. 


Re vie w Da te  

The Australian Government will review this plan in five years. 



 

N S W   O f f i c e   o f   E n v i r o n m e n t   a n d   H e r i t a g e  

P a g e   2 5  

 

Recovery Plan  



 

Magenta Lilly Pilly 

13. 

Re fe re n c e s  



Armstrong, M n.d., Personal communication, Department of Defence. 

Atlas of NSW Wildlife 2010, ‘Internal report of all records of Syzygium paniculatum - Magenta Lilly Pilly’, 

accessed 2 June 2010, Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water, Sydney. 

Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service 2009, ‘Eucalyptus/Guava Rust’, AQIS website, accessed 

24 May 2010, 

1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə