Nee soon swamp forest, singapore: bryophytes to angiosperms



Yüklə 5.22 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/61
tarix07.08.2017
ölçüsü5.22 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   61

 

 

CHECKLIST OF THE PLANT SPECIES OF  



NEE SOON SWAMP FOREST, SINGAPORE: 

BRYOPHYTES TO ANGIOSPERMS

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

H. F. Wong, S. Y. Tan, C. Y. Koh, H. J. M. Siow, T. Li, A. Heyzer,  



A. H. F. Ang, Mirza Rifqi bin Ismail, A. Srivathsan and H. T. W. Tan 

 

 



 

 

National Parks Board and 



 

Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research 

National University of Singapore 

Singapore 



2013 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 



CHECKLIST OF THE PLANT SPECIES OF  

NEE SOON SWAMP FOREST, SINGAPORE: 

BRYOPHYTES TO ANGIOSPERMS 

 

 



 

 

 



H. F. Wong

1

S. Y. Tan



1

C. Y. Koh

1

H. J. M. Siow



1

T. Li



A. Heyzer

1

A. H. F. Ang



2

Mirza Rifqi bin Ismail

3

A. Srivathsan



2

 

and H. T. W. Tan



 2

 

1



Tropical Marine Science Institute, National University of Singapore 

18 Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119227, Singapore 

2

Department of Biological Science, National University of Singapore 



14 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543, Singapore 

3

National Parks Board, Singapore Botanic Gardens, 1 Cluny Road, Singapore 259569, Singapore 



Email: 

tmswhf@nus.edu.sg

 (HFW); 

tmstsy@nus.edu.sg

 (SYT);  

tmskcy@nus.edu.sg

 (CYK); 

tmssmhj@nus.edu.sg

 (HJMS); 

litianjiao88@gmail.com

 (TL); 

tmsah@nus.edu.sg



 (AH); 

andie@nus.edu.sg 

(AHFA); 

Mirza_Rifqi_ISMAIL@nparks.gov.sg

 

(MRI); 


asrivathsan@nus.edu.sg

 (AS); and 

dbsttw@nus.edu.sg

 (HTWT) 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

National Parks Board and 



 

Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research 

National University of Singapore 

Singapore 



2013 

 

Checklist  of  the  Plant  Species  of  Nee  Soon  Swamp  Forest,  Singapore:  Bryophytes  to 

Angiosperms by

 

H. F. Wong, S. Y. Tan, C. Y. Koh, H. J. M. Siow, T. Li, A. Heyzer, A. H. F. Ang, Mirza Rifqi 

bin Ismail, A. Srivathsan and H. T. W. Tan 

 

is published by the: 



 

National Parks Board 

National Parks Board Headquarters 

1 Cluny Road 

Singapore 259569 

REPUBLIC OF SINGAPORE 

Website: 

http://www.nparks.gov.sg/cms/

 

Email: 


nparks_mailbox@nparks.gov.sg

 

 



Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research 

Department of Biological Sciences 

Faculty of Science 

National University of Singapore 

6 Science Drive 2 

Singapore 117546 

REPUBLIC OF SINGAPORE 

Website: 

http://rmbr.nus.edu.sg/

 

Email: 



ask.rmbr@gmail.com 

 

 



 

 

Editor:  

Hugh T. W. Tan 

Copy Editor:  Hazelina H. T. Yeo 

Typesetter:   Chua Keng Soon 

 

 



 

 

Cover photograph of Syzygium papillosum (Duthie) Merr. & L.M.Perry © Tony O’Dempsey 



(

www.florasingapura.com

)

 

 



 

 

 



ISBN 978-981-07-2022-3 (online) 

 

 



 

 

 



© 2013 Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research 

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any 

form, or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of 

the copyright holder. For information regarding permission(s), please write to: 

ask.rmbr@gmail.com

 

 



 

 

 



 

Cover photograph of Bulbophyllum macranthum Lindl. © Hugh Tan Tiang Wah. 

See 

Corrigenda of 13 May 2013





 



CONTENTS 

 

1.

 



Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 1 

2.

 



General Statistics ........................................................................................................................ 2 

3.

 



Reference Sources ...................................................................................................................... 2 

4.

 



Acknowledgements .................................................................................................................... 4 

5.

 



Literature Cited ........................................................................................................................... 4 

6.

 



Citation of this Book .................................................................................................................. 7 

7.

 



Appendices ................................................................................................................................. 8 

a.

 



Appendix 1: Checklist of the Plant Species of the Nee Soon Swamp Forest by Species, 

Variety or Form ................................................................................................................. 8 

b.

 

Appendix 2: Checklist of the Plant Species of the Nee Soon Swamp Forest by Phylum 



and Family ..................................................................................................................... 265 

 

 



INTRODUCTION 

 

The Republic of Singapore (1



22



N, 103

48



E), off the southernmost tip of Peninsular Malaysia, is 

separated  from  the  Asian  continent  by  the  Strait  of  Johor  in  the  north.  As  of  2012,  the  total 

combined  land  area  of  Singapore  was  715.8 km

2

  and  it  had  a  mid-year  population  estimate  of 



5,312,400,  contributing  to  a  7,422  km

2



  population  density  (Singapore  Department  of  Statistics, 

2007).  Temperatures  and  rainfall  are  typical  of  equatorial  areas,  with  average  monthly  daily 

temperatures  ranging  from  26.6

28.3



C  from  the  coolest  to  warmest  months  (Meteorological 

Services  Division,  2009).  The  climate  of  Singapore  can  be  categorised  into  four  periods.  The 

northeast monsoon takes place from Nov. to Jan. and the southwest monsoon takes place from May 

to Sep. These monsoon periods are separated by two inter-monsoon periods in Apr. and from Oct. 

to  Nov.  The  relative  humidity  is  high,  and  the  annual  precipitation  for  2011  was  2,524  mm 

(Singapore Department of Statistics, 2012). 

 

In primeval Singapore Island, primary tropical rainforest covered almost all the land area (Corlett, 



1991).  Its  constituent  forest  types  are  dryland  forest  (82%  forest  cover),  mangrove  forest  (13%), 

freshwater swamp forest, and beach vegetation. The remaining 5% forest cover consists mostly of 

freshwater  swamp  forest  and  a  small  amount  of  beach  vegetation  along  the  narrow  beach  areas. 

Freshwater  swamp  forest  was  inferred  to  have  occurred  at  the  upper  reaches  of  the  streams  and 

rivers of Singapore Island, before the massive clearance of natural vegetation cover that took place 

from  1819

1900.  However,  with  rapid  urbanisation  and  industrialisation  in  the  20



th

  century,  the 

remaining freshwater swamp forest sites were cleared for land use changes in Jurong, Mandai, and 

Pulau  [= island] Tekong, leaving  Nee  Soon Swamp Forest  (NSSF)  as  the  last remnant of primary 

freshwater swamp forest in Singapore (Corlett, 1992; Ng & Lim, 1992; Turner et al., 1996a, 1996b; 

Yeo & Lim, 2011). 

 

The  NSSF  (1°24



N,  103°48

E),  which  extends  over  87  ha,  is  located  in  the  Central  Catchment 



Nature Reserve near Mandai Road and adjacent to the Upper Seletar Reservoir, in the northeastern 

part of Singapore (Ng & Lim, 1992; Turner et al., 1996a; Taylor et al., 2001). Its surface is covered 

by a shallow layer of peat (Taylor et al., 2001). The ground is often saturated with water, forming 

small  pools  and  slow-flowing  streams  (Turner et al., 1996a;  Taylor et al., 2001)  owing  to  the 

closeness  of  the  water  table  to  the  soil  surface  (Turner et al., 1996a).  The  anaerobic  and 

waterlogged conditions found in the soil reduce its rate of decomposition, which contributes to its 

richness in organic matter (Turner et al., 1996a). The pH of stream and soil water is between 4.6–

5.5, and becomes more acidic 5 cm below the surface of the soil (Turner et al., 1996a). 

 


Wong et al. 

Vegetation surveys showed that the NSSF has a rich flora. More than 700 vascular plant species, or 



31% of all vascular plants of Singapore, were recorded from the freshwater swamp forests, though 

many  of  these  species  were  recorded  in  areas  that  have  since  been  cleared  (Turner et al., 1996a; 

Corlett, 1997; Yeo & Lim, 2011). 

 

Much of the forest was cleared for plantations in the mid-19



th

 century, and which were abandoned 

soon  after  owing  to  unsustainable  methods  in  agriculture  (Turner  at  al.,  1996c).  Thus,  secondary 

forests have been allowed to develop naturally and now cover part of the site (Turner at al., 1996c). 

Some areas have apparently never been cleared, and contain vegetation characteristic of undisturbed 

primary forests (Turner at al., 1996c). Many of the tree species in some parts of  the NSSF display 

conspicuous  adaptations  to  flooding,  including  buttress  roots,  stilt  roots,  and  pneumatophores, 

whereas  some  areas  are  dominated  by  plant  species  similar  to  those  of  a  dryland  forest  (Corner, 

1978; Corlett, 1997, 2011). Trees were recorded to reach heights of over 40 m in areas with primary 

forest growth (Corner, 1978; Turner et al., 1996a). 

 

 

GENERAL STATISTICS 



 

A total of 1,184 species, varieties, and forms of plants from six phyla and 161 families is recorded 

in this checklist. Table 1 presents the six phyla found in the NSSF and the number of families and 

species/varieties/forms within each phylum. 

 

Table 1. Number of species, varieties, forms, and families of plants from the six phyla documented from the 



Nee Soon Swamp Forest. 

S/No. 

Phylum 

Number of Families 

Number of Species, Varieties, and Forms 

1. 


Bryophyta 

13 



2. 

Marchantiophyta 

10 

21 


3. 

Lycophyta 



4. 



Filicinophyta 

18 


39 

5. 


Gnetophyta 



6. 

Magnoliophyta 

123 

1,101 


 

Total 

161 

1,184 

 

 



REFERENCE SOURCES 

 

The  two  checklists  (Appendices  1,  2)  include:  (1)  species  compiled  by  Turner et al. (1996a)  on 



vascular  plants  in  freshwater  swamp  forests  in  Singapore,  (2)  species  recorded  in  the  survey 

conducted  by  Wong  (1993)  within  four  0.2-ha  plots  in  the  NSSF,  (3)  herbarium  specimens  in  the 

Herbarium,  Singapore  Botanic  Gardens  (SING)  and  in  the  Herbarium,  Raffles  Museum  of 

Biodiversity  Research,  National  University  of  Singapore  (SINU),  (4)  collections  made  by  HFAA, 

MRI, and AS from Feb.

Apr.2010 and Dec.2010 



 Jan.2011, (5) species collected within 10 15 × 

15  m  quadrats  by  SYT,  CYK,  HJMS,  TL,  HFW,  and  AH  from  May 2011 

  Jan.2012,  and  (6) 



literature sources. 

 

We excluded species recorded by Corner (1978) in the compilation by Turner et al. (1996a), as the 



collection localities, Jurong and Mandai Road, were developed and submerged under Upper Seletar 

Reservoir. For SING and SINU collections, the information was last updated in May and Sep.2010, 

respectively. The SING list included Chan Chu Kang, which refers to an area larger than the present 

NSSF prior to deforestation. Extensive areas of swamp forests in Chan Chu Kang were developed 

between  1940

1941  to  extend  Seletar  Reservoir  (Corner, 1978).  Collections  made  before  that 



period  were  annotated  as  Chan  Chu  Kang  (pre-1940).  Other  references  (Table 2)  include  articles 

Checklist of the Plant Species of Nee Soon Swamp Forest, Singapore: Bryophytes to Angiosperms

 



from Nature in Singapore (denoted as ‘NiS’) and Gardenwise (‘Gdn’). Goh & Tan (2000), Metcalfe 

et  al.  (1998),  Oginuma  &  Tobe  (1995),  and  Setogchi  et  al.  (1999)  were  denoted  ‘G&T’,  ‘M’, 

‘O&T’, and ‘S’, respectively. The national conservation status categories listed are based on Chong 

et al. (2009). 

 

 

Table 2. List of references adopted for checklist compilation. 



S/No. 

Sources 

Number of Species, Varieties, and 

Forms 

1.

 



 

Ang et al. (2010a) 

2.

 



 

Ang et al. (2010b) 

3.

 



 

Ang et al. (2010c) 

4.

 



 

Ang et al. (2010d) 

5.

 



 

Ang et al. (2011a) 

6.

 



 

Ang et al. (2011b) 

7.

 



 

Ang et al. (2011c) 

8.

 



 

Ang et al. (2011d) 

9.

 



 

Ang, Mirza Rifqi bin Ismail & Srivathsan 

194 

10.


 

 

Chan Chu Kang, pre-1940 (SING herbarium) 



408 

11.


 

 

Goh & Tan (2000) 



12.


 

 

Hassan Ibrahim et al. (2011) 



13.


 

 

Keng et al. (1998) 



14.


 

 

Kurzweil et al. (2007) 



15.


 

 

Lee et al. (2011) 



16.


 

 

Leong-Skornicková (2010) 



17.


 

 

Lok & Tan (2008a) 



18.


 

 

Lok & Tan (2008b) 



19.


 

 

Lok & Tan (2009) 



20.


 

 

Lok et al. (2009a) 



21.


 

 

Lok et al. (2009b) 



22.


 

 

Lok et al. (2009c) 



23.


 

 

Lok et al. (2009d) 



24.


 

 

Lok et al. (2010a) 



25.


 

 

Lok et al. (2010b) 



26.


 

 

Lok et al. (2010c) 



27.


 

 

Lok et al. (2011a) 



28.


 

 

Lok et al. (2011b) 



29.


 

 

Lok et al. (2011c) 



30.


 

 

Lok et al. (2011d) 



31.


 

 

Loo (2011) 



32.


 

 

Metcalfe et al. (1998) 



33.


 

 

Nee Soon, post-1940 (SING collections) 



568 

34.


 

 

NSSF team 



365 

35.


 

 

Oginuma & Tobe (1995) 



36.


 

 

Setogchi et al. (1999) 



37.


 

 

SINU collections 



296 

38.


 

 

Teo et al. (2011) 



39.


 

 

Turner (2003) 



40.


 

 

Turner et al. (1996a) 



383 

41.


 

 

Wong (1993) 



167 

42.


 

 

Yam et al. (2010) 





Wong et al. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

 

We  would  like  to  thank  the  National  Parks  Board  (Singapore)  for  providing  us  with  the  research 



grant  (WBS:  R-347-000-152-490),  permits  (NP/RP10-101-1,  NP/RP10-101-1c),  and  support  with 

fieldwork  during  the  course  of  the  project,  Nee  Soon  Swamp  Forest  Biodiversity  and  Hydrology 

Baseline Studies―Phase I; the Ministry of Defence for permitting us access to areas around the Nee 

Soon ranges I and II; and members of the Herbarium, Singapore Botanic Gardens, especially Wong 

Khoon  Meng  and  Serena  Lee,  as  well  as  Chua  Keng  Soon  of  the  Herbarium,  Raffles  Museum  of 

Biodiversity  Research,  National  University  of  Singapore  for  allowing  us  access to  the  herbariums 

and  their  resources.  We  thank  Adrian  H.  B.  Loo  for  teaching  the  team  (CYK  and  SYT)  about 

identification  of  rattan  species  in  the  field;  Gwee  Aik  Teck  for  identifying  numerous  specimens; 

Benito C. Tan for his help with bryophyte statuses in Singapore; as well as various members of the 

Botany  Laboratory,  Department  of  Biological  Sciences,  National  University  of  Singapore  who 

offered their assistance whenever needed. We are also grateful to Richard T. Corlett for his advice 

on the history of Nee Soon Swamp Forest; and Dennis H. Murphy for providing us with extensive 

maps of the Nee Soon Swamp Forest. 

 

 



LITERATURE CITED 

 

Ang,  W.  F.,  A.  F.  S.  L.  Lok  &  H.  T.  W.  Tan,  2010a.  Rediscovery  in  Singapore  of  Pinanga 



simplicifrons (Miq.) Becc. (Arecaceae). Nature in Singapore3: 83–86. 

Ang,  W.  F.,  A.  F.  S.  L.  Lok,  C.  K.  Yeo,  S.  Y.  Tan  &  H.  T.  W.  Tan,  2010b.  Rediscovery  of 



Dendrobium aloifolium  (Blume)  Rchb.f.  (Orchidaceae)  in  Singapore.  Nature  in  Singapore,  3

321–325. 

Ang,  W.  F.,  A.  F.  S.  L.  Lok,  K.  Y.  Chong  &  H.  T.  W.  Tan,  2010c.  Status  and  distribution  in 

Singapore  of  Neoscortechinia sumatrensis  S.Moore  (Euphorbiaceae).  Nature  in  Singapore,  3

333–336. 

Ang, W. F., A. F. S. L. Lok, K. Y. Chong, B. Y. Q. Ng, S. M. Suen & H. T. W. Tan, 2010d. The 

distribution  and  status  in  Singapore  of  Rubus moluccanus L. var. angulosus Kalkman 

(Rosaceae). Nature in Singapore3: 91–97. 

Ang, W. F., A. F. S. L. Lok, C. K. Yeo, A. Angkasa, P. X. Ng, B. Y. Q. Ng & H. T. W. Tan, 2011a. 

Rediscovery  of  Renanthera elongata (Blume) Lindl.  (Orchidaceae)  in  Singapore.  Nature  in 



Singapore4: 297–301. 

Ang,  W.  F.,  A.  F.  S.  L.  Lok,  C.  K.  Yeo,  B.  Y.  Q.  Ng  &  H.  T.  W.  Tan,  2011b.  The  status  and 

distribution in Singapore of Plocoglottis javanica Blume (Orchidaceae). Nature in Singapore4

73–77. 


Ang, W. F., A. F. S. L. Lok, C. K. Yeo, S. Y. Tan, P. X. Ng, B. Y. Q. Ng & H. T. W. Tan, 2011c. 

The status and distribution of Nephelaphyllum pulchrum Bl. (Orchidaceae) in Singapore. Nature 



in Singapore4: 273–276. 

Ang,  W.  F.,  A.  F.  S.  L.  Lok,  K.  Y.  Chong,  C.  K.  Yeo,  B.  Y.  Q.  Ng,  P.  X.  Ng  &  H.  T.  W.  Tan, 

2011d. Eulophia R.Br. ex Lindl. (Orchidaceae) of Singapore. Nature in Singapore4: 289–296. 

Chong, K. Y., H. T. W. Tan & R. T. Corlett, 2009. A Checklist of the Total Vascular Plant Flora of 



Singapore:  Native,  Naturalised  and  Cultivated  Species.  Raffles  Museum  of  Biodiversity 

Research, National University of Singapore, Singapore. 273 pp. Uploaded 12  Nov.2009. 

http:// 

rmbr.nus.edu.sg/raffles_museum_pub/flora_of_singapore_tc.pdf

Corlett,  R. T., 1991. Vegetation. In: Chia, L. S., A. Rahman &  B. H.  Tay (eds.),  The Biophysical 



Environment of Singapore. Singapore University Press, Singapore. Pp. 134

161. 



Corlett,  R.  T.,  1992.  The  ecological  transformation  of  Singapore,  1819–1900.  Biogeography,  19

411–420. 

Corlett,  R.  T.,  1997.  The  vegetation  in  the  nature  reserves  of  Singapore.  The  Gardens’  Bulletin, 

Singapore49: 147–159.  


Checklist of the Plant Species of Nee Soon Swamp Forest, Singapore: Bryophytes to Angiosperms

 



Corlett, R. T., 2011. Terrestrial ecosystems. In: Ng, P. K. L, R. T. Corlett & H. T. W. Tan (eds.), 

Singapore  Biodiversity:  An  Encyclopedia  of  the  Natural  Environment  and  Sustainable 

Development.  Raffles  Museum  of  Biodiversity  Research,  Department  of  Biological  Sciences, 

National University of Singapore, Singapore. Pp. 44–51. 

Corner,  E.  J.  H.,  1978.  The  Freshwater  Swamp-Forest  of  South  Johore  and  Singapore.  Botanic 

Gardens, Parks and Recreation Department, Singapore. 266 pp. 

Goh,  M.  W.  K.  &  H.  T.  W.  Tan,  2000.  The  Angiosperm  Flora  of  Singapore:  Connaraceae. 

Singapore University Press, Singapore. 30 pp. 

Hassan  Ibrahim,  P.  K.  F.  Leong,  T.  W.  Yam  &  H.  K.  Lua,  2011.  The  rediscovery  of  the  ground 

orchid Dienia ophrydis (J. König) Seidenf. (Orchidaceae) in Singapore. Nature in Singapore4

329–337. 

Keng,  H.,  S.  C.  Chin  &  H.  T.  W.  Tan,  1998.  The  Concise  Flora  of  Singapore.  Volume  II: 



Monocotyledons. Singapore University Press, Singapore. 215 pp. 

Kurzweil,  H.,  P.  K.  F.  Leong,  T.  W.  Yam,  T.  Aung  &  D.  Liew,  2007.  Pteroceras  pallidum―An 

endangered orchid in Singapore. Gardenwise29: 26. 

Lee,  S.,  K.  M.  Wong  &  H.  K.  Lua,  2011.  The  re-discovery  and  conservation  of  Bulbophyllum 



singaporeanumGardenwise36: 6–7. 

Leong-Skornicková, J., 2010. Spindle gingers―Jewels of Singapore's forests. Gardenwise34: 24–

25. 

Lok,  A.  F.  S.  L.  &  H.  T.  W.  Tan,  2008a.  Rediscovery  of  Aeschynanthus  albidus  (Blume)  Steud. 



(Gesneriaceae) in Singapore. Nature in Singapore1: 5–8. 

Lok, A. F. S. L. & H. T. W. Tan, 2008b. Status of Cyrtosperma merkusii (Hassk.) Schott (Araceae) 

in Singapore. Nature in Singapore1: 179–182. 

Lok,  A.  F.  S.  L.  &  H.  T.  W.  Tan,  2009.  Tuberous,  epiphytic,  rubiaceous  myrmecophytes  of 

Singapore. Nature in Singapore2: 231–236. 

Lok,  A.  F.  S.  L.,  P.  X.  Ng,  W.  F.  Ang  &  H.  T.  W.  Tan,  2009a.  The  status  and  distribution  in 

Singapore of Acriopsis liliifolia (Koenig) Ormerod (Orchidaceae). Nature in Singapore2: 481–

485. 


Lok, A. F. S. L., W. F. Ang & H. T. W. Tan, 2009b. The status of Gastrodia javanica (Bl.) Lindl. in 

Singapore. Nature in Singapore2: 415–419. 

Lok, A. F. S. L., W. F. Ang, P. X. Ng, A. T. K. Yee & H. T. W. Tan, 2009c. The distribution and 

status in Singapore of Bulbophyllum sessile (Koen.) J.J.Sm. (Orchidaceae). Nature in Singapore


  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   61


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə