Newsletter of the Kwongan Foundation : 3 June 2013 Kwongan Vision



Yüklə 3.05 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə3/3
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü3.05 Mb.
1   2   3

David gazing at the Regelia

The biodiversity and ambience of this area 

is beautifully  captured by  the photographer 

responsible  for  all  these  photos,  in  a 

description of a morning walk. 

In all Bryony  mentions 3 animal species; 4 

reptile  species;  12+  invertebrate  species; 

18  bird  species in  a  4  hour  walk  through 

the wonderful plant life. Ed.



Bryony Fremlin

 

  



Excerpts  from 

‘A  Walk  Through 

Anstey-Keane Damplands’

Wedged  between  3  major  roads,  a 

scattering  of  rural  properties  and 

burgeoning  housing  estates,  is  Anstey-

Keane  Dampland,  a  308-hectare  Bush 

Forever nature reserve in the southeastern 

suburb  of  Forrestdale.  The  reserve  is 

special,  not  just  for  its   abundant  flora 

species,  it  also  supports a  rich  variety  of 

animal  life:  birds   and  mammals,  reptiles, 

i n v e r t e b r a t e s ,  a m p h i b i a n s  a n d 

crustaceans. 

It  is  special  because  for  its  size  for,  by 

metropolitan standards,  it  is a big reserve. 

It  is  because  of  its  large  size,  un-

fragmented by  roads, that Anstey-Keane is 

in such good condition.

Night Heron Track, Lot 63, 6.45am.

‘Traffic now barely audible. Dodder, draped 

over  a  small  bush,  glows  golden  in  the 

early  sunlight.  Tall wispy  Pimelia lanata is 

flowering.’ 

23

Dasypogon

Biodiversity at Anstey-Keane


‘In the paddock ahead, six kangaroos 

graze in the cool light of dawn.’

‘Fringed Regelia shrubs still  bear  flowers, 

though  most  are  past  their  best.  A  gentle 

warmth now in the air.’

‘As I  walk  along,  I  pass countless animal 

tracks.  The  trail’s  white  sand  is  like  an 

embroiderer’s  sampler:  complex,  fancy 

stitches  designed  and  laid  down  by  the 

skittering,  scurrying,  slithering  feet  and 

bodies  of  reptiles,  secretive  mammals, 

birds  and  insects.  Delicate  and  sinuous, 

they  meander  in  twists  and  turns  across 

the  powdery  sand  in  pleasing,  artistic 

designs,  often leaving one  mystified as to 

whom  their  creators  might  be.  Easier  to 

recognize  are  the  large,  lithe,  sweeping 

marks made by  snakes and  monitors,  the 

straight,  chunky  traces  of  bobtail  skinks, 

and  the  wide-spaced  prints  of  kangaroos 

and quendas.  But like sand castles on the 

beach,  these  ephemeral  works  of  art  are 

not to last, when the warm  summer breeze 

starts to  blow across the land,  they  subtly 

and  gently  get  swept  away.’ Always to be 

replaced.

‘I  disturb  a  blue  skimmer  dragonfly. 

Languorous in  the  cool  early  morning,  he 

floats  around  for  a  moment  or  two,  then 

settles  on  a  twig  in  the  shade,  where, 

despite  his  showy  blue  colouring,  he  is 

almost invisible.’

‘Garrulous  flocks   of  honeyeaters   chatter 

and  squabble  around  me  as  they  feast 

upon  the  flowers  of  the  Candlestick 

banksias.  Little  wattlebirds  chortle 

excitedly as they flap from tree to tree.’

‘I  suddenly  find  myself  in  the  midst  of  a 

flock  of  rainbow  bee-eaters,  they  are  all 

around me, streaking through the air. They 

flick their wings in and out. The sun’s rays 

shine  through  their  outstretched  wings 

setting them aglow with burnt orange light. 

With fluent sweeps and curves they  weave 

like  ice  skaters  through  banksia  and 

modong  trees,  they  skim over  thickets  of 

fringed regelia,  and the air  rings with their 

purring, fluty calls.’

‘The air is still and warm, it resonates with 

honeyeater song.  I hear the distant, single 

caw of a raven.’

24

Insect friends



‘Birds  scold  from  within  a  nearby  regelia 

thicket, two male blue wrens emerge...’

‘A western grass-dart alights on the tip of a 

leafy  sprig.  Slowly  she  opens   her  wings 

until  she  looks  like  a  tiny  orange  and 

brown  paper  aeroplane.  The  posture  is 

characteristic  of  this  little  butterfly, 

forewings held vertical, hind wings flat.’

‘I  spy  a velvet  ant  scurrying about  on  the 

track,...........’

‘Ants  of  various  sizes   crawl  at  my  feet. 

Among  them  is  an  insect  that  at  first 

glance I mistake for another ant. But closer 

inspection reveals it to be, not an ant but a 

tiny  praying  mantis,  so  small  it  is  barely 

visible.  Artfully  camouflaged  in  shades  of 

brown, it  moves along in stops and starts, 

stabbing the air with its stout  little arms as 

though  challenging  the  ants  to  a  boxing 

match.’


‘The air is still and warm, it resonates with 

honeyeater song.  I hear the distant, single 

caw of a raven.’

‘A  wanderer  butterfly  drifts  by;  it  flutters 

away,  into  the  distance,  headed  for  who 

knows where.’

10 45 am.

‘I  trudge  along  the  dazzling  white 

track  that  is  fringed  on  both  sides 

with  sand  bottlebrush.  The  first 

flowers  of  the  season  are  bursting 

out. They are the colour of hot coals, 

ignited  by  the  intense  mid  morning 

sunshine.  In  a  week  or  two,  these 

feathery,  vermilion  blooms  will  set 

the land on fire.’

25

Beaufortia squarrosa


UPCOMING EVENTS FOR THE KWONGAN FOUNDATION

Watch out for the upcoming Kwongan Foundation events in 2013

The Kwongan Workshop on the ecology of WA’s arid zone 

09/07/2013.  The program is now available from:

Barbara Jamieson     

barbara.jamieson@uwa.edu.au

The Kwongan Colloquium: Thursday 19/09/2013

The Kwongan Fieldtrip: Saturday 21/09/2013

The topic is ‘Biodiversity in the Perth Metropolitan Area’ 

Prof. Hans Lambers,

School of Plant Biology,

The University of Western Australia

Crawley, WA 6009



email: 

hans.lambers@uwa.edu.au

EDITORIAL

Greetings. I hope you enjoy Kwongan Matters 3 and that it conveys 

some  of  the  enthusiasm  we  all  feel  for  this  unique,  irreplaceable 

and world significant flora, as well as some solid information.

Our Western Australian flora is fabulous and I just hope there will be 

millions of flowers for the future in reserves, along all our roadsides, 

on  private  and  government  properties  and  in  every  back  yard, 

garden,  patio  and  flower  vase.  So  many  people  want  to  visit 

Western  Australia  to  see  our  wildflowers  these  days,  we  must 

consider  them  as a  highly valuable natural  resource.  One that just 

gets  on  with  it  and  only  gets  better,  given  the  chance.  We  will 

delight you  with  stories about  it  from  the many people working  to 

learn more and wanting to share their knowledge and love of it.

Offers of articles for the October 2013 issue of Kwongan 

Matters are requested by end of September 2013.

 Please contact me:   

suepr22@yahoo.com

or Hans, as above, if you would like to submit an article, small item 

or photos.

All the best, 

Sue Radford [editor].


DONATION FORM

Please accept my tax deductible gift of $........................... to

The Kwongan Foundation for the Conservation of Australia’s 

Biodiversity. *



Please make your cheque payable to The University of Western 

Australia or debit my credit card

Annually 

☐ 

Once only 



☐ 

Mastercard 

☐ 

Visa 


☐ 

Amex 


☐ 

Diners 


Cardholder’s Name:..................................................................

Signature:................................................ Expiry 

Date:..................../.........................

* A gift of $5,000 or more entitles you to become a Patron.

Please contact 

barbara.jamieson@uwa.edu.au

 

if you wish to 



become a Corporate Sponsor

Send to: The School of Plant Biology M084, The University of 

Western Australia,

35 Stirling Highway, CRAWLEY, WA 6009 



Tel: 08 6488 1782 Fax: 08 6488 1108



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə