Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   24

Nomination of
The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Its Cultural and Natural Heritage
for inscription on the World Heritage List
Submitted to UNESCO by the
Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka
1 January 2008

Nomination of
The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Its Cultural and Natural Heritage
for inscription on the World Heritage List
Submitted to UNESCO by the
Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka
1 January 2008

 
 
 
Contents 
 
 
   
 
 
                                                                               
Page 
Executive Summary 
 
vii 
 
1.
 
Identification of the Property 
 
1   
 
 1.a 
Country 
  

 
 1.b 
Province 
  

 
 
1.c Geographical coordinates 

 
 
1.e Maps and plans 
 

 
 
1.f Areas of the three constituent parts of the property 

 
 
1.g Explanatory statement on the buffer zone 

 
2.
 
Description 
   

 
 
2.a Description of the property 

 
  2.a.1 
Location 
 

 
  2.a.2 
Culturally 
significant 
features 

 
   PWPA 
 

 
   HPNP 
 

 
 
 
 
 
KCF 
 

 
  2.a.3 
Natural 
features 
10 
 
   Physiography 
10 
 
 
   Geology 
13 
 
 
 
 
Soils 
 
14 
 
   Climate 
and 
hydrology 
15 
 
 
 
 
 
Biology                  
16   
 
 
 
 
 
PWPA 
20 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Flora 
20 
 
     Fauna 
25 
 
 
 
 
 
HPNP   
28 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Flora 
28 
 
     Fauna 
31 
 
 
 
 
 
KCF 
 
34 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Flora 
34 
 
     Fauna 
39 
 
 
2.b History and Development 
 
44 
 
  2.b.1 
Cultural 
features 
 
44 
 
   PWPA 
  
44 
 
   HPNP 
  
46 
 
 
 
 
KCF 
 
 
47 
 
  2.b.2 
Natural 
aspects 
 
49 
 
   PWPA 
  
51 
 
   HPNP 
  
53 
 
 
 
 
KCF 
 
 
54 
 
 
 

3.
 
Justification for Inscription 
 
 
59   
 
3.a Criteria under which inscription is proposed  
 
(and justification under these criteria) 
59 
 
 
3..b Proposed statement of outstanding universal value 
80 
 
  3.b.1 
Cultural 
heritage 
 
80 
 
  3.b.2 
Natural 
heritage 
 
81 
 
 
3.c Comparative analysis 
 
84 
 
  3.c.1 
Cultural 
heritage 
 
84 
 
   PWPA 
  
84 
 
   HPNP 
  
85 
 
 
 
 
KCF 
 
 
86 
 
  3.c.2 
Natural 
Heritage 
 
86 
 
 
3.d Integrity and authenticity 
 
89   
 
  3.d.1 
Cultural 
features 
 
89 
 
   PWPA 
  
89 
 
   HPNP 
  
90 
 
 
 
 
KCF 
 
 
90 
 
  3.d.2 
Natural 
features 
 
91 
 
4.
 
State of Conservation and Factors Affecting the Property 
95 
 
 
4.a Present state of conservation  
95 
 
  4.a.1 
PWPA 
  
95 
 
  4.a.2 
HPNP 
  
97 
 
  4.a.3 
KCF 
  
98 
 
 
4.b Factors affecting the property 
98 
 
  (i) 
Development 
pressures 
98 
 
   PWPA 
  
98 
 
   HPNP 
  
100 
 
   KCF 
  
100 
 
  (ii) 
Environmental 
pressures 
100 
 
   PWPA 
  
100 
 
   HPNP 
  
100 
 
   KCF 
  
101 
 
 
 
(iii) Natural disasters and risk preparedness 
101 
 
  (iv) 
Visitor/tourism 
pressures 
101 
 
   PWPA 
  
101 
 
   HPNP 
  
101 
 
   KCF 
  
101 
 
 
 
(v) Number of inhabitants within the property  
 
 
 
      and the buffer zone   
102 
 
   PWPA 
  
102 
 
   HPNP 
  
102 
 
   KCF 
  
102 
 
5.
 
Protection and Management of the Property 
103 
 
 5.a 
Ownership 
   
103 
 
  PWPA 
   
103 
 
  HPNP 
   
103 
 
  KCF 
   
103 
5.b Protective legislation 
 
 
 
103 
 
  PWPA 
   
103 
 
  HPNP 
   
103 
 
iv 

 
  KCF 
   
104 
5.c Means of implementing protective measures 
104  
5.d Existing plans related to municipality and region in which  
 
 
the proposed property is located  
 
104 
5.e Property management plan or other management system 
105 
5.f Sources and levels of finance 
 
 
105 
5.g Sources expertise and training in conservation and  
 
management 
techniques 
   
105 
5.h Visitor facilities and statistics 
 
 
106 
 
  PWPA 
   
106 
 
  HPNP 
   
106 
 
  KCF 
   
106 
5.i  Policies and programmes related to the presentation  
 
and promotion of the property   
 
107 
5.j  Staffing levels (professional, technical, maintenance) 
107 
 
6. 
 
Monitoring 
     
109 
6.a  Key indicators for measuring state of conservation 
109 
 
6.a.1 
PWPA 
    
109 
 
6.a.2 
HPNP 
    
111 
 
6.a.3 
KCF 
    
112 
6.b Administrative arrangements for monitoring the property 
114 
6.c Results of previous reporting exercises   
114 
 
7.  Documentation   
 
 
 
  
     7.a Photographs, slides, image inventory and authorization  
           table and other audiovisual material 
See Appendix 4  
7.b Texts relating to protective designation, copies of property  
      management plans or documented management systems  
      and extracts of other plans relevant to the property 
117 
7.c Form and date of most recent records or inventory of the property 
117 
7.d Addresses where inventory, records and archives are held 
117 
7.c 
Bibliography 
    
118 
 
8. Contact information of responsible authorities  
131 
      8.a Preparer – name, title, address, city, telephone, fax, e-mail 
131 
      8.b Official local institution/agency   
 
131 
      8.c Other local institutions   
 
 
132 
      8.d Official web address: http://, contact name, e-mail 
132 
 
9.  Signature on behalf of the state Party  
 
132 
 
10. 
 
 
Maps 
     
133 
 
Appendix 1 Indigenous plant species 
 
143 
Appendix 2 Faunal species   
 
 
165 
Appendix 3 Explanatory note on System of Management 
191 
Appendix 4 Image inventory and photograph and audiovisual  
201 
authorization 
form 
`    
 
 
 
 


Abbreviations 
 
BP before 
present 
CBO Community 
based 
organization 
CF Conservation 
Forest 
dbh 
diameter at breast height 
DWLC Department of Wildlife Conservation 
FD Forest 
Department 
FFPO  Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance 
HPNP  Horton Plains National Park 
IUCN  The World Conservation Union 
KCF 
Knuckles Conservation Forest 
MOE  Ministry in charge of the Environment 
msl 
mean sea level 
NARESA Natural Resources, Energy and Science Authority (now the National 
Science Foundation) 
NSF     National Science Foundation, Sri Lanka 
PAM & WLC Protected area management and wildlife conservation project 
PW 
Peak  Wilderness 
PWNR  Peak Wilderness Nature Resrve 
PWPA  Peak Wilderness Protected Area 
PWS 
Peak Wilderness Sanctuary 
WCMC  The World Conservation Monitoring Centre 
 
vi 

Executive Summary
State Party
State, Province or Region
Name of Property
Geographical coordinates
Textual description of the boundaries
A4 size maps of the nominated property showing the boundaries and buffer zones
where present
The Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, generally shortened to Sri Lanka
(formerly, Ceylon)
Central and Sabaragamuwa Provinces of Sri Lanka
The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage
This is a serial property, comprising three constituent parts, whose coordinates (of their
central points) are as follows:
Peak Wilderness Protected Area (PWPA):
6 48' 04 96” N 80 37' 31 13” E
Horton Plains National Park (HPNP)
6 48' 22 07” N 80 47' 47 55”E
Knuckles Conservation Forest (KCF)
7 27' 08 82” N 80 48' 07 56” E
PWPA and HPNP are contiguous, both forming part of the Central Massif. KCF is located
in the Knuckles Massif which is separated from the Central Massif by a low-lying plateau.
PWPA
The boundary of PWPA includes the outer boundaries of the Peak Wilderness Nature
Reserve, the Peak Wilderness Conservation Forest, the Walawe Basin Conservation Forest
and the Morahela Conservation Forest, and, in its eastern extension, it has a common
boundary with HPNP. The boundary of the Peak Wilderness Nature Reserve has been
defined by notification in the government gazette under the provisions of the Fauna and
Flora Protection Ordinance. The boundaries of the three conservation forests have been
defined by notification in the government gazette under the provisions of the Forest
Ordinance.
HPNP
The boundary has been defined in the government gazette notification declaring this area a
national park under the provisions of the Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance.
KCF
The boundary has been defined in the government gazette notification declaring this area a
conservation forest under the provisions of the Forest Ordinance.
These are included in the main text.
0
0
0
0
0
0
:
:

Justification
Mixed
World Heritage
Cultural values
PWPA
HPNP
KCF
The three constituents of this serial property possess features of outstanding universal value
in both the cultural and natural spheres. It is being nominated for inscription as a
The development of Adam's Peak within
, as a religious monument, is linked to Sri
Lanka's ancient civilization where the ruling monarchs, while building thousands of
reservoirs to store water and provide the people with sustainable living conditions, also
placed great emphasis on promoting religious values. PWPA, with the focus on what is
believed to be the footprint of Lord Buddha atop the mountain, has a cultural heritage that
dates back to the pre-Christian era. The cultural cum religious traditions and beliefs
associated with Adam's Peak have continued in an almost unbroken chain till the present
day. Many kings who have reigned since the 11 century AD have lent their patronage to this
religious monument and it is recorded that some of the monarchs had climbed the mountain
to worship at the shrine. Marco Polo, in the 13 century, and the Arab traveler Ibn Batuta, in
the 14 century, have visited the peak and recorded their observations. Long prior to that the
Buddhist traveler monk Fa Hien in his book Travels in India and Ceylon (393-414 AD)
records his visit to Adam's Peak and his interpretation of the origin of the foot print.
At the present time around two million people, the great majority of them being pilgrims,
climb the mountain every year. Numerous traditional practices, some of them many
centuries old, are performed by the pilgrims, many of them while being engaged in the
arduous climb to the peak.
The mountain is also associated with the deity Saman who is said to be the custodian of this
area, and many religious practices are associated with paying homage to this deity. These
beliefs and practices have an equally long tradition as the worship of the footprint.
presents a cultural landscape of a different kind. Studies in many parts of Sri Lanka
had revealed that Mesolithic man, called
, the progenitors of
Sri Lanka's aboriginal people the
, had occupied many different parts of the country.
Archaeological investigations extended to the relatively undisturbed sites in Horton Plains,
a high elevation tableland (> 2000 m above msl), where soil cores were extracted from
depths of up to six metres, have revealed a remarkable sequence of cultural practices of pre-
historic man in this area. Archaeological and palaeo-ecological evidence based on radio-
carbon dated multiproxy data (on pollen, spores, diatoms, phytoliths), organic carbon, total
carbon, etc. reveal the presence of humans in this area from around 24,000 years up to 3600
years before present. During this long period, starting with forest clearing and burning and
the hunter forage culture, he advanced to incipient agriculture with the growing of oat and
barley and later still to farming with rice. These changes coincided with changing climatic
conditions in the area. This evidence suggests that plant domestication took place here
earlier that what was thought to be the origin of agricultural practices using oats, barley and
rice elsewhere in South Asia.
Recent research studies in
have revealed the presence of caves within this forest with
evidence of artifacts of a similar kind to those found in other archaeological sites which
have been dated to the early Mesolithic period. Much later (around the third century BC)
these caves began to be occupied by Buddhist monks. According to legend King Valagamba
th
th
th
Homo sapiens balangodensis
veddas
viii

ix
had ordered drip-ledges to be made on the rock at the entrance to the caves. A drip ledge is
an architectural feature chiseled along the brow of the cave to divert rain water away from
the entrance.
The villages within and outside the boundary of KCF, have until recent times, been
extremely difficult to reach. In the construction of dwelling places, in the type of
household items in use and in their agricultural and religious practices the villagers have
continued with their age-old traditions. Steps will be taken to conserve and protect
examples of this ancient lifestyle.
The property, with its three constituent parts, is situated in the wet southwest of Sri Lanka.
It is the sole representative that still remains in a near pristine state, of the montane and
submontane element of that small fraction of the world's rainforest biome, which, because
of its distinctive nature, has been identified as the Ceylonese Rainforest by Udvardy.
Having separated from the Indian subcontinent in the Miocene Epoch and but little
influenced by the intermittent land connections that have occurred since then up to the
Holocene, southwest Sri Lanka has remained isolated from outside influence and its biota
have pursued their own course of evolution. The rainforest in the southwest of the country
is rich in biodiversity. A high proportion of its species are endemic, with the level of
endemicity exceeding 50 per cent in many of the plant and animal taxonomic groups.
Endemism in the island is highly concentrated (over 90 per cent of the endemic species) in
the humid southwest of the country.
All of the 58 species of the plant family Dipterocarpaceae are endemic and all, but one, are
restricted to the wet zone. In the same family, the endemic genus
with 26
species counts 11 species found exclusively in the mountainous region, mainly in PWPA.
In the faunal groups, endemicity among the amphibian species is 83 per cent, and a great
many of them are restricted to the mountainous region Because of their restricted habitats
due to extensive deforestation in the past, which led to fragmentation of the Sri Lankan
rainforest on a massive scale, many of the endemic species of fauna and flora are under
severe threat of extinction. Sri Lanka, with the Western Ghats of India, has been named as
the world's biodiversity hotspot with the highest level of threat to its biota due to human
activity.
Because of Sri Lanka's past link with peninsular India as part of the Deccan Plate, many
plants and animals at the generic and supra-generic level are also found in peninsular
India. Long separation from peninsular India, however, has led to radiation leading to the
evolution of new species and subspecies. For example, the purple faced langur
has evolved into several morphologically different forms in Sri
Lanka, with
being restricted to the montane zone and inhabiting the
property. In Malabar, in mainland India, it has evolved into a distinct subspecies
.
Some plant species in the wet southwest of the island are considered to be Gondwanic,
signifying the fact that the island was once a part of the giant continent of Gondwanaland.
Two of these, in the genus
(out of a total of three),
and
, in the endemic subfamily Hortonioideae, are restricted to the mountainous
region and found in the property.
Natural values
Stemonoporus
Semnopithecus vetulus
S. vetulus monticola
S. vetulus
johnii
Hortonia
H. floribunda
H.
ovalifolia
3. Justification for Inscription

There is an approximately equal distribution of the endemic biota between (a) the low and
mid-country wet zone and (b) the submontane and montane wet zone. The former is
represented by the Sinharaja Forest Reserve, a World Heritage, while the latter is
represented by the property now nominated.
A remarkable feature of the wet zone biota is the many instances of point endemism that
have been observed i.e. where the distribution of endemic species is highly localized. This
type of distribution adds to the vulnerability of the species.
Between KCF and PWPA, there are many species that are common to both indicating their
common geological origin; but at the same time there are some remarkable instances of
allopatric speciation where two distinct species of the same genus are found, one in KCF
and the other in PWPA. Examples are
and
(a
lizard and frog respectively) in KCF and
and
in PWPA. This
trend in evolution would have been the result of separation through several thousand years
of these two mountain massifs by a relatively low-lying plateau. There is no doubt that the
evolutionary processes that have shaped the biota of the central highlands would continue,
provided the habitats where they occur are given adequate protection.
Horton Plains, unlike the rugged and highly dissected mountainous country of PWPA,
consists of a high-elevation tableland. Its biotic features are also distinctive. The vegetation
of the plains consists of grasses and other herbaceous plants as well as one of the most
reduced forms of bamboo,
, just about half a metre in height.
Several of the herbaceous plants and of the tree species that occur in patches are,
surprisingly, of East Himalayan, and therefore of Laurasian, stock. It is suggested that these
species had reached the highlands of Sri Lanka by “island hopping” during geological
periods when favourable conditions prevailed, by way of a corridor or stepping stones
bearing a moist and cool climate with light frost. Others claim that it would have occurred
through long-distance dispersal.
The three constituents of the property contain landscapes and present views of exceptional
natural beauty. The breathtaking sight from Adam's Peak, especially at the break of dawn,
presents a rare spectacle that has been described in superlative terms by many authors.
The landscape of Horton Plains and the view from “World's End”, with a drop of nearly
1000 m, has attracted the attention of a growing number of tourists.
KCF is noted for its extremely rugged and highly dissected mountain range, with 35 peaks
and numerous near-vertical sided escarpments with drops of several hundred metres. Five
of the peaks give the appearance of a clenched fist from afar, hence the name.
Criterion iii
Bear a unique or at least exceptional testimony to a cultural tradition or to a civilization
which is living or which has disappeared
Criterion v
Be an outstanding example of a traditional human settlement, land-use, or sea-use which is
representative of a culture (or cultures), or human interaction with the environment
Cophotis dumbarae
Nannophrys marmorata
C. ceylanica
N. ceylonensis
Sinarundinaria densifolia
Criteria under which the property is nominated
x

especially when it has become vulnerable under the impact of irreversible change
Criterion vi
Be directly or tangibly associated with events or living traditions, with ideas, or beliefs,
with artistic and literary works of outstanding universal significance
Criterion vii
Contain superlative natural phenomena or areas of exceptional natural beauty and aesthetic
importance
Criterion viii
Be outstanding examples representing major stages of earth's history, including the record
of life, significant ongoing geological processes in the development of land forms, or
significant geomorphic or physiographic features
Criterion ix
Be outstanding examples representing significant ongoing ecological and biological
processes in the evolution and development of terrestrial, freshwater, coastal and marine
ecosystems and communities of plants and animals
Criterion x
Contain the most important and significant natural habitats for
conservation of
biological diversity, including those containing threatened species of outstanding
universal value from the point of view of science or conservation
in situ
xi
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə