Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə10/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   24

Criterion ix:
Be outstanding examples representing significant ongoing ecological and biological
processes in the evolution and development of terrestrial, freshwater, coastal and
marine ecosystems and communities of plants and animals.
71
3. Justification for Inscription

state: “Both (i.e. in reference to the families Dipterocarpaceae and Myrtaceae) have
speciated within the island to an astonishing degree and, but for deforestation, give every
indication of continuing diversification”.
The Dipterocarpaceae counts 26 species of
. Different groups of species of
are seen to occupy different altitudinal zones from sea level to the montane
area (Greller et al. 1987). This is suggestive of allopatric speciation. At the same time,
within a forest two or more of the species are often found (in this case suggestive of
sympatry), but with a highly localized
distribution where, with rare exceptions,
only one species appears among the
dominants in a particular part of the forest.
In the montane forests represented by the
serial property, scientific findings among
the fauna provide even stronger evidence
of geologically recent as well as ongoing
ecological and biological processes in the
evolution and development of the taxa.
Among the fauna, the history of the
endemic purple-faced langur of Sri Lanka
(
) is of special
interest in relation to this criterion The
o l d e s t c o l o b i n e r e m a i n s e a s t o f
Afghanistan are the fossil remains in the
Pakistan Siwaliks dated 7-5 million years
BP (Barry 1987) indicating that colobines
did not reach eastern Asia until the end of
the Miocene (Delson 1994). As geological
evidence points out that Sri Lanka was
linked to southern India on at least two
occasions in the Tertiary, it has been
concluded that the endemic Purple faced
langur (
) is among
the relicts of the original faunas that had
entered Sri Lanka after its isolation in the Miocene, through the intermittent land linkages
with India that formed during the Pleistocene, and did not drift back to the mainland (Hill
1934). Since then the purple faced langur in Sri Lanka has evolved into the several
morphologically different forms recognizable today, while in Malabar, in mainland India,
it evolved into a distinct species (
) (Hill 1934; Brandon-Jones et al.
2004).
The three morphologically distinct Sri Lankan sub-species of this endemic colobine occur
within the three constituents of the nominated property. They are the small- bodied wet
lowland form with short, black fur, which ranges into the foothills of PWPA; the montane
large-bodied sub-species with long fur occupying the upper elevations of PWPA and
HPNP, and the large bodied sub-species inhabiting the drier areas of KCF. The KCF sub-
species, though having longer fur than the typical lowland dry zone animals is
nevertheless considered distinct from the montane sub-species (Hill, 1934). The three sub-
Stemonoporus
Stemonoporus
Semnopithecus vetulus
.
Semnopithecus vetulus
Semnopithecus johnii
72
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
Semnopithecus vetulus
monticola at HPNP
© Samantha Mirandu

species show allopatry, a process that could be considered to be ongoing.
Molecular genetic analysis has shown that the Sri Lankan leopard, the only representative
in the island of the genus
which diverged from other felids about 1.8 million
years ago, is a unique sub species (
) and distinct among the 10
subspecies of leopard found the world over (Miththapala, 2006). Notably, all three
nominated properties provide habitats for
the subspecies of
leopard endemic to Sri Lanka.
Sri Lanka's snail fauna shows evidence of Sri Lanka's long association with peninsular
India; and the island's molluscs are considered to be ideal subjects for studies in
evolutionary biology (Naggs et al. 2005). Thirteen of the 60 land snail genera recorded in
Sri Lanka are also found in peninsular India (primarily in the Western Ghats), and
approximately 50% of all species found in Sri Lanka belong to genera found only in
southern India and Sri Lanka (Raheem et al. 2000). Despite this, long isolation and the
concomitant evolutionary processes have resulted in a Sri Lankan molluscan fauna that is
the most distinct in the South Asia Region.
Of special significance in the serial property is that despite KCF sharing in a common
geological origin with PWPA and Horton Plains, it has been separated by a relatively low-
lying plateau for a sufficiently long time to have developed many distinctive features in its
fauna at the species and subspecies level, particularly among the herpetofauna. Moreover
the multiplicity of site conditions within the Knuckles mountains has given rise to a wide
range of habitats that have spurred radiation among this group of fauna.
Panthera,
Panthera pardus kotiya
Panthera pardus kotiya,
Panthera pardus kotiya from an endemic subspecies, found at all
three nominated sites (photographed at night, in HPNP, by the
nomination team)
73
3. Justification for Inscription
© Samantha Mirandu

An example of allopatric speciation is the genus
.
which is
confined to the upper echelons of the Knuckles range of mountains had diverged around
7.1 million years BP from the closely related
which is found in the Central
Massif, barely 50 km away (Pethiyagoda, 2005a). Schulte et al. (2002) have shown that
the endemic genus
was derived from a common 'Indian' ancestor about 13
million years BP. The geographical distribution of the five species within the endemic
genus
is notable in terms of allopatric radiation.
is
confined to the KCF;
is widespread in some forests of the Central Massif,
including PWPA and HPNP;
is found in some parts of the Central
Massif (including PWPA) and the Rakwana mountain range; and
and
are known only from small populations at the higher elevations of the
Ceratophora
C. tennentii
C. stoddartti
Ceratophora
Ceratophora
Ceratophora tennentii
C stoddartii
Ceratophora aspera
Ceratophora erdeleni
C. karu
Cophotis dumbarae
C. ceylanica
confined to the KCF and
in the central highlands, from an endemic genus
(right)
(left)
74
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
Allopatric speciation of lizards from an endemic genus:
(top
left) and
(right) in forests of the central massif, and the globally
threatened
confined to the KCF (bottom left)
Ceratophora aspera
C. stoddartii
Ceratophora tennentii
.
© Nuwan Bandara
© Anslem de Silva
© Suranjan Fernando
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Pradeep Samarawickrama

Sinharaja World Heritage Site (De Silva et al. 2005f)
The endemic lizard genus
, originally thought to be monotypic (
being the species) had radiated into a recently discovered distinct species within
the Knuckles range and has been named
. While
is found in the
Central Massif, with its best known populations in HPNP (Manamendra-Arachchi et al.
2006),
is rare and confined to KCF.
The 32 species of Sri Lankan
species of shrub frogs analysed by
Meegaskumbura et al. (2002) have also revealed an insular endemic radiation
(Pethiyagoda, 2005b). Molecular studies have shown that some of the
species in
the Knuckles mountains were separated from their sister taxa in the Central Massif around
4 to 7 million years ago (Meegaskumbura & Manamendra-Arachchi (2005).
Among the freshwater fishes,
and
confined to the KCF, show that they have evolved to survive in particular
stream habitats (Goonewardene et al. 2006).
in particular displays
high habitat specificity (Pethiyagoda, 1991).
Sri Lanka's wet zone in the southwest of the island, covering an area of a mere 15,000 km ,
is home to a unique piece of the world's rainforest biome. The island's rainforest has been
designated the Ceylonese (Sri Lankan) Rainforest within the Indomalayan Realm by
Udvardy (UNESCO 1981). The wet zone, with a perhumid, everwet climate, though small
in area, nevertheless rises from sea level to an altitude of over 2500 m. The Sri Lankan
rainforest harbours an extraordinary collection of endemic species of fauna and flora.
These forests which were once extensive within the wet zone were subject to deforestation
on a massive scale over the past 200 years or so, leaving the Sri Lanka component of the
rainforest biome now represented only by isolated patches scattered over the wet zone
amounting, in total, to just around 10 per cent of the zonal land area. Deforestation took
place throughout the rainforest's altitudinal range. Yet, there is reason to believe that what
remains of the rainforest still harbours nearly all of the biota that it once contained, albeit in
a state where further deforestation could lead to extinctions on a massive scale. It was only
three decades ago that the value of these rainforests as the only refuge of some of the rarest
biological species began to be recognized. It was not long before the wet zone of Sri Lanka
was named as one of 25 hotspots in the world i.e. an area that “features exceptional
concentrations of species with exceptional levels of endemism and that face exceptional
degrees of threat” (Myers 1988).
The concentration of species in terms of number per unit area of forest is reputed to be
among the highest in the world. Despite its small size, Sri Lanka has the highest
biodiversity per unit area in the Asian region for mammals, reptiles and amphibians, ahead
of mega diversity countries such as Malaysia, Indonesia and India, and is second in the
Asian region for bird diversity per unit area (NARESA 1991). Sri Lanka is also known to
be the richest country worldwide in terms of amphibian species diversity per unit area
(3.9/1000 km ), with Costa Rica being a fairly distant second (Pethiyagoda &
Manamendra Arachchi 1998, Manamendra-Arachchi & Pethiyagoda 2005).
Cophotis
Cophotis
ceylanica
C. dumbarae
C. ceylanica
C. dumbarae
Philautus
Philautus
Garra phillipsi, Puntius srilankensis
Puntius
martenstyni,
Puntius martenstyni
Criterion x:
Contain the most important and significant natural habitats for
conservation
of biological diversity, including those containing threatened species of outstanding
universal value from the point of view of science or conservation.
in situ
2
2
75
3. Justification for Inscription

Among the world's hotspots, southwest Sri Lanka (coupled with the Western Ghats of
India) ranks highest in terms of the threat to the species from a high and expanding human
population (Cincotta et al. 2000).
The Sri Lankan rainforest has two distinct elements: one, the lowland and mid-country
rainforest and the other the montane and submontane rainforest. The three constituent parts
of the nominated property (PWPA, HPNP and KCF) are located in the latter region. The
biota, particularly at the species and intraspecific levels, in the natural forests of this region
(montane and submontane) show distinctive features which set them apart from the forests
of the low and mid-country rainforest. Because of the sharp variations in environmental
conditions within the montane and submontane region, including the highly dissected
nature of the terrain, there is a multiplicity of habitats even within a small area of forest
resulting in a patchy distribution of species to an extent seen nowhere else (Ashton &
Gunatilleke (1987a); commenting on the extreme localization of the flora these authors
state that there is no comparable analogue elsewhere in Asia or the Far East. The same is
true of the fauna, particularly the herpetofauna.
The three serial sites are selected to capture as near as possible the full complement of
habitat variations and species diversity within this montane and submontane bioclimatic
zone in order to conserve the range of biodiversity that now exists, particularly targeting the
endemics. Satisfying criterion x to an exceptional degree is the most compelling natural
feature of this property justifying its being inscribed on the World Heritage List.
In the National Conservation Review of all the forests in the island of over 200 ha in area,
eight relatively large contiguous forests were identified in relation to their importance for
the conservation of biodiversity (IUCN & WCMC 1997). If conserved, they were expected
to give protection to at least 79% of woody plant diversity, at least 88% of endemic woody
plant diversity, at least 83% of faunal diversity and at least 85% of endemic faunal diversity.
Peak Wilderness, Horton Plains and Knuckles, which are among the eight identified areas,
represent the prime sites for the conservation of the submontane and montane elements of
the island's biodiversity (
.).
Very few areas in the montane zone have escaped deforestation or encroachments or illicit
timber felling by tea estate workers and local villagers. Hence minimal disturbance to the
original virgin forest was a key consideration in selecting the sites for inclusion in the
property to be nominated. In KCF, the first ranking forest (out of the 204 surveyed for
biodiversity) in terms of faunal diversity, some sections had been under-planted with
cardamom for commercial harvesting, but with the progressive elimination of this practice
the original forest appears to be regenerating. This observation is expected to be confirmed
through ongoing scientific investigations.
A second important consideration was size; the three serial sites are the only sizable areas
where the natural vegetation exists, as near as possible, in its pristine condition. They are
hence the sole refuge of a large number of endemic and threatened species of fauna and
flora where
conservation would ensure continued survival.
How has the central highlands of Sri Lanka acquired its stature as the abode of a unique
collection of endemic fauna and flora? Though dealt with more extensively elsewhere in
this nomination, we need to have a brief look here at the interesting evolutionary history of
this part of the wet zone represented by the three nominated constituents PWPA, KCF and
HPNP The ancestors of a majority of the present day species would have rafted on the
ibid
in situ
.
76
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Deccan Plate as it moved northwestwards following the break-up of Gondwanaland and
finally become isolated in wet southwest Sri Lanka. With the tectonic upliftment of the
land, a part of the rainforest would have been exposed to cooler conditions. Radiation
within the montane zone has given rise to many new species that are now restricted to this
zone. The montane and submontane forest is therefore a unique piece of the world's
Humid Tropical Forest Biome. The fact that endemism does not extend beyond the genus
and species level (except for the subfamily Hortonoideae among the flora) speaks of the
evolutionary changes in the montane flora having taken place in the more recent
geological history of the island.
We also need to note that between the periods of mountain building erosion had taken
place on a massive scale. One outcome of this is the presence of a relatively lowlying
plateau between the Central Massif and the Knuckles range providing a passage for the
Mahaweli Ganga from the west of the country where it originates to the east. This plateau
serves as a dispersal barrier, particularly for the herpetefauna. The results are seen in the
allopatric speciation that has occurred, with some species being restricted to KCF and
some to PWPA and other parts of the Central Massif, as described elsewhere in this
nomination.
It must be emphasized that some of the species in southwest Sri Lanka are of Himalayan
lineage, and therefore derived from Laurasian stock. For example, the presence of three
members of temperate eastern Himalayan elements of the tree family Ericaceae viz
,
subsp.
and
in HPNP and its surroundings is of considerable historical biogeographic
significance. While some biogeographers argue that these plant migrations from the
.
Gaultheria leshenaultii Rhododendron arboreum
zeylanicum
Vaccinium
leshenaultii
77
3. Justification for Inscription
Rhododendron arboreum
zeylanicum (an endemic subspecies),
at Horton Plains
© Studio Times

eastern Himalayan region had occurred through 'island hopping', during geological
periods when favourable conditions prevailed, by way of a corridor or stepping stones
bearing a moist and cool climate with light frost, others claim that it would have been
brought about by long-distance dispersal (Ashton & Gunatilleke 1987a).
The montane forests (represented by the serial property) contain the only habitats of many
threatened plant species and are therefore of prime importance for their
conservation. Of Sri Lanka's rich endemic flora, 62 species are confined to the montane
and submontane zone, and of these, 25 are found only in the Peak Range i.e in PWPA
(Ashton & Gunatilleke 1987a). This tiny area (in comparison to the country as a whole) has
been designated Bioregion 14 by Ashton and Gunatilleke (
.). The species include the
orchids
and
several species of
(Myrtaceae), several species of the endemic dipterocarp
,
(Hyacinthaceae) and
(Asclepiadaceae). Whereas 11
species of the genus
are found in PWPA, only one (
) is present in
and restricted to KCF. This species is so rare that only a very few individuals have been
observed.
Turning our attention to the fauna, the available evidence strongly supports the importance
of the montane area for the
conservation of many localized endemic species. Special
attention needs to be drawn to the amphibians which are the subject of intense ongoing
research. The rachophorids of the genus
have been the subject of detailed study
based on available type material and fresh collections, and Manamendra-Arachchi and
Pethiyagoda (2005) have described 27 species new to science, all endemic to Sri Lanka.
Nearly all of them are from the wet zone of the island, with several being confined to the
Central Massif and Knuckles. In addition, they have revised the names of 26 species that
had been placed in other genera and assigned them to
. They add that further
investigations are proceeding and many previously undescribed species are coming to
light. They are of the view that the total Sri Lankan anuran fauna may eventually exceed
140, of which
species alone may number around 70.
The endemic frog species
is found only in the Central Massif up to
about 2000 m in altitude (Dutta & ManamendraArachchi 1996). It has not been observed
in the KCF. The three nominated sites, and in particular the KCF, are important in
conserving
of an endemic monotypic genus. As it is believed that
many more amphibian species await discovery, HPNP, PWPA and KCF will grow in
importance as refugia for Sri Lanka's highly diverse amphibian fauna, including species
yet to be discovered.
Most of Sri Lanka's endemic serpentoid reptiles are found in the wet zone, and several of
them are confined to the central hills up to altitudes of 1500 m (Pethiyagoda 1998). For
example, the montane hump-nosed viper
is found mainly in the Central
Massif (Pethiyagoda 1998) and in KCF. KCF is also the major habitat for
, a geographical relict endemic species from a monotypic genus (De Silva et al.
2005a). Two species of the endemic genus
are also found in the nominated
property.
occurs only in the montane zone above 1200 m, and is found at both
HPNP and PWPA but is absent in KCF, while its sister species
is found only in
the Knuckles Massif (
).
The endemic genus
(the pygmy lizard) inhabits only the highest altitude forests
of the montane zone (Pethiyagoda 1998). There are two species: one ( .
)
in situ
ibid
Adrorhizon purpurascens
Podochilus falcatus,
Syzygium
Stemonoporus Dipcadi
montanum
Brachystelma lankana
Stemonoporus
S. affinis
in situ
Philautus
Philautus
Philautus
Microhyla zeylanica
Lankanectes corrugatus
Hypnale nepa
Chalcidoseps
thwaitesii
Ceratophora
C. stoddartii
C. tennentii
ibid
Cophotis
C dumbarae
78
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

confined to the KCF and the other ( .
) in the other two constituents of the
nominated property. The endemic
(blackcheek lizard) occurs only in
montane habitats over 1000 m, and it is most commonly seen at Horton Plains
(Pethiyagoda 1998). Overall, of Sri Lanka's 11 endemic genera of reptiles (De Silva 2006),
ten are represented by 20 species within the three nominated properties.
Among the birds, the endemic
and
range through
the montane zone of the island; the latter is found only at the higher elevations and is rare
below the altitude of 1000 m.
is found at PWPA while
is found at KCF, PWPA and HPNP.
Four of the nine species of shrews in Sri Lanka are endemic; three of the endemics are
restricted to the central highlands. Of these,
and
occur in the nominated property (Wijesinghe & Goonetilake 2005).
an endemic rodent, is similarly restricted to the montane areas and is found in
PWPA and HPNP, while
is found in all three areas but only above c.1800
m (
).
C ceylanica
Calotes nigrilabris
Zoothera spiloptera
Eumyias sordida
Zoothera spiloptera
Eumyias
sordida
Solisorex pearsoni
Suncus fellows-
gordoni
Rattus
montanus,
Ratufa macroura
Ibid
79
3. Justification for Inscription
The globally threatened
(top), the endemic
(bottom left) and the
endemic
(bottom
right)
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə