Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə11/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   24

Ratufa
macroura
Calotes
nigrilabris
Eumyias sordida
© Ruchira Somaweera
© Ruchira Somaweera
© Rahula Perera

The three nominated areas are of significance for conservation of the island's endemic and
endangered primate genetic diversity. A compilation of all existing range information on
the endemic and globally endangered purple-faced leaf monkey
(Dela 2004) shows that three of the currently recognized morphologically distinct sub-
species occur within the KCF, HPNP and PWPA. Similarly, two morphologically distinct
subspecies of the endemic and globally threatened macaque (
) are found in
the nominated property. Both species of
found in Sri Lanka are present in the
property, including the endemic red slender loris which ranges into HPNP and PWPA
(Molur et al. 2003, Groves & Meijaard. 2005). The Horton Plains Slender Loris of Sri
Lanka is among the top 25 primates in the world which are on the verge of extinction.
The available faunal data on the three constituents of the property underscores the fact that
these areas are of vital importance in terms of conserving the country's faunal complement,
particularly the endemic species, many of which are globally threatened
and
geographically relict forms of the island's biota, particularly among the herpetofauna.
The nominated property, The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: its cultural and natural
heritage, comprises three constituent parts: The Peak Wilderness Protected Area (PWPA),
Horton Plains National Park (HPNP) and the Knuckles Conservation Forest (KCF). The
central highland where the land rises steeply to an elevation of over 2500 m above msl
occupies only a very small fraction of the island's land area. PWPA and HPNP are in the
main block of highlands referred to as the Central Massif while KCF is in an isolated part
referred to as the Knuckles Massif. The three constituents collectively bear features of
outstanding universal value in relation to both culture and nature. They meet the conditions
set out in several of the criteria, both cultural and natural, for justifying their inclusion in
the World Heritage List.
On the advent of Buddhism to Sri Lanka (c. 200 BC), and for several centuries thereafter,
the reigning monarchs paid overwhelming attention to the promotion of religion while at
the same time building irrigation works for the sustenance of the people. These were the
twin aspects of Sri Lanka's remarkable hydraulic civilization that spanned several
centuries. While religious monuments were built in the dry zone centres of Anuradhapura,
Polonnaruwa and Ruhuna, Adam's Peak in the central highlands attracted the attention of
the people because of the indentation on the summit of the Peak which was thought to be
the footprint of the Lord Buddha (called
, or sacred footprint). Soon pilgrims began
to cross to the wet zone forest and climb the mountain to worship at the Peak. Several
reigning kings have also visited the site, notably King Vijayabahu I (1055 1110 AD), King
Nissankamalla (1187 1196 AD), and King Panditha Parakrama Bahu I (1236
1271 AD).
They had ordered measures to be taken to ease the climb to the Peak. Hence, Marco Polo
who climbed the Peak in the 13 century had noted the chains that were provided to assist
the pilgrims in their ascent. Ibn Batuta, the 14 century Arab traveler, having visited the
shrine refers to the grotto at the foot of the Peak.
Today, Adam's Peak, or
, is one of the most important religious cum cultural sites
in Sri Lanka with a tradition dating back to pre-Christian times. It is held sacred by
Buddhists the world over. Around two million pilgrims visit the shrine every year. They are
Semnopithecus vetulus
Macaca sinica
Loris
Sripada
-
-
-
Sri pada
3. b Proposed Statement of Outstanding Universal Value
3. b. 1 Cultural Heritage
th
th
80
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

mainly Buddhists, but also include Hindus and Muslims. Mention must be made that at
various times in the history of Adam's Peak, the footprint as a holy shrine also became
associated with three other great religions of the world, Christianity, Islam and Hinduism,
as the footprint of Saint Thomas, Adam and Lord Shiva respectively.
The cultural heritage value of Horton Plains came to light through the discovery of sites
occupied by prehistoric man in Horton Plains and the presence of geometric microliths and
other artifacts at these sites. The discovery was to a great extent substantiated by evidence
from detailed palaeo-ecological studies recently carried out by the Post- graduate Institute
of Archaeology of the University of Kelaniya in collaboration with the University of
Stockholm. Investigations of peat and sediment deposits from cores up to six metres depth
have revealed a remarkable sequence of cultural practices that were adopted by Mesolithic
man at this site. The sequence begins prior to 18,500 years BP, when slash and burn
agriculture was practised. This is followed by the adoption of agricultural practices
beginning with the incipient management of oat and barley (17,600 -16000 years BP). The
first appearance of systematic cultivation occurred when the conditions were warmer and
wetter, at around 13,000 years BP. At around this time oat and barley was being replaced by
wild varieties of rice. Land use appears to have decreased from about 8000 BP, and by
3600 years BP the area was almost deserted.
The South Asian region was considered to have witnessed the world's earliest human
civilization based on rice, oat and barley cultivation, dated at 15,000 years BP. The new
evidence from the Horton Plains shows that at this site incipient cultivation of these plants
was practised at least two millennia earlier.
The discovery of human remains and geometric microlithic stone tools and other artifacts
dating back to around 27,000 years BP in the foothills of the range (at Batadomba- lena and
Beli-lena) suggest that it was the same Late Quaternary humans named
(Balangoda man) (Kennedy et al. 1987, Deraniyagala 1992 ) that were
responsible for the developments in Horton Plains..
The cultural aspects of the third serial site, KCF, have not been subject to the same level of
investigation as the other two sites. However, recent findings have revealed the presence
of caves within the forest with Mesolithic artifacts and animal remains that indicate
occupation by man in Late Quaternary times. Much later, in around 100 BC, Buddhist
monks have occupied these caves which had been worked on to create drip ledges to divert
the down-flowing rain water away from the entrance. More investigations are being
carried out by the Archaeological Department in the University of Peradeniya.
Because of the remoteness and inaccessibility of the area, the villages in the heart of the
Knuckles range had for centuries been untouched by modern developments. Some
monuments of this ancient culture will be preserved.
Southwest Sri Lanka, accounting for just 23 per cent of the island's land area, is a region
with a perhumid climate. In the classification of the world's biomes, the climax vegetation
of this area has the distinction of being separately named the Ceylonese (Sri Lankan)
Rainforest (UNESCO 1981). This small segment of the world's rainforest system has an
exceptionally high level of biodiversity per unit area of forest, with a high proportion of its
biota being endemic. Over 90 per cent of the island's endemic biotas are concentrated in a
Homo sapiens
balangodensis
3. b . 2 Natural Heritage
81
3. Justification for Inscription

most extraordinary way in the natural forests of the wet zone, in the southwest quarter.
From about two centuries ago, the natural forests in the wet zone were subject to clearing
on a massive scale that led to fragmentation of the once extensive forests into a large
number of isolated blocks, many just a few hundred hectares in extent. They cover, in total,
just 10 per cent of the wet zone land area. What is more, many of the forests that escaped
wholesale clearing were subject to intensive selective logging. Today the residual forests
in the wet zone are recognized as forming a biodiversity hotspot, i.e. an area with an
exceptional concentration of species, with exceptional levels of endemism and facing high
levels of threat (Myers 1990, Myers et al. 2000). As for the impact of human population
expansion on the biota, southwest Sri Lanka, together with the Western Ghats of India, is
said to face by far the highest level of threat of the world's biodiversity hotspots (Cincotta
et al. 2000).
Within the small area designated the wet zone, there is a remarkable amplitude in terms of
elevation, the land rising from sea level to over 2500 m, so dividing the area into lowland,
mid-elevation, submontane and montane regions. The property, The Central Highlands of
Sri Lanka: its Cultural and Natural Heritage, consisting of three areas, is situated across
the montane and submontane regions. The three areas are: Peak Wilderness Protected Area
(PWPA), Horton Plains National Park (HPNP), and the Knuckles Conservation Forest
(KCF).
The exceptional features of this fragment of the world's rainforest system in the southwest
of Sri Lanka relate to the the world's geological history following the events after the break
up of the southern continent of Gondwanaland. Sri Lanka's geological history links it to the
Deccan Plate which drifted northwards with the break-up of the giant southern continent
of Gondwanaland at the end of the Mesozoic era. It separated from peninsular India in the
Miocene and has remained as a separate geographical entity since then although
intermittent temporary connections with India would have occurred up to the Holocene
due to fluctuations in the sea level. Its common origin with the Deccan Plate would
naturally mean that Sri Lanka shares with peninsular India many taxa. The period of
separation and the double isolation that southwest Sri Lanka has had with the subcontinent
because of the mountain barrier and the expansive area of the seasonally dry zone in the
northern half of the island have, however, resulted in the evolution of species endemic to
the island and their concentration in a most remarkable way in the wet zone at all
elevations.
The endemic species in the southwest are distributed somewhat roughly equally between
the lowlands and the mountainous country. The lowland and mid-elevation rainforest
system is represented by the Sinharaja Forest Reserve which was inscribed in the World
Heritage List in 1988. The three constituents of the present serial property are the most
representative, in terms of the least disturbed montane and submontane rainforest of a
sizable extent, to serve as a refuge for the endemic species restricted in their distribution to
the forests at these elevations. They are selected as representing as near as possible the full
complement of montane and submontane biota.
There are over 3000 indigenous angiosperm species in Sri Lanka, of which 27.5 per cent
are endemic (Senaratne 2001). The vast majority of the endemics (around 95 per cent) are
restricted to the wet zone. The endemic angiosperm taxa are predominantly at the species
or intraspecific level indicating speciation over a relatively short period on a geological
time scale. The upliftment of the land giving rise to the mountainous region would have
82
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

exposed the lowland biota to cooler conditions to which they would have had to adapt
leading to speciation (Werner 1982). Not surprisingly, therefore, although the montane
areas share with the lowlands many taxa at the family and generic level, there are many
species and subspecies that are restricted to one or the other of the altitudinal zones
indicating allopatric radiation, a process that would indeed continue given adequate
population densities.
Two families of particular interest in relation to the distribution of species between the
mountains and the lowlands are the Dipterocarpaceae and the Myrtaceae. The
Dipterocarpaceae is a widespread family, extending eastwards to Western Malesia and
New Guinea. It has, in Sri Lanka, as many as 58 species, all of them endemic and all but one
restricted to the wet zone. Though the majority of them are confined to the low and mid
elevations, there are several that are restricted to the montane and submontane zones,
primarily in PWPA. Several species of the endemic genus
show single
species dominance in different parts of the forest where they occur. This extreme
localization of flora that is seen in many other species too is a singular characteristic of the
Sri Lankan rainforest, not observed anywhere else. The presence of several species of
with highly localized distribution (point endemism) within the same forest
complex is strongly suggestive of sympatric speciation. Of the 26 species of
,
eleven are confined to the montane and submontane zones, an exceptional case of
dipterocarps occurring at such high elevations (Greller et al. 1987). Only one of these
species occurs in KCF, and it is found only in KCF; it is the extremely rare
(Green
& Jayasooriya 1996)
The Myrtaceae, by contrast with the Dipterocarpaceae, are richer in species in the
mountains than in the lowlands.
, as with the dipterocarp
, shows a
high level of local endemism and distinct species groups are recognizable.
has 25
indigenous species, of which 12 are endemic to the island. Of the endemics, nine are
restricted to different parts of the montane and submontane zones. Some have very resticted
distribution e.g.
in PWPA,
in KCF.
The segregation of species is seen in other families too. The genus
(Melastomataceae) has 32 indigenous species, of which 27 are endemic, and of these eight
are montane species. Of the montane species, two are confined to PWPA Two species of
(Clusiaceae),
and
are very prominent in the
montane forests. These and two others
and the very rare
are
found only in the montane and submontane areas (Dassanayake & Fosberg 1980). Several
other species of
are present only in the lowlands.
High levels of species richness and endemism are no less evident among the fauna in
southwest Sri Lanka. While showing affinities with the species of peninsular India,
geographical separation from the subcontinent since the Miocene, with only intermittent
land connections up to the Holocene, have led to speciation in a number of taxa resulting in
a unique collection of faunal species in the wet southwest. Even during periods when land
connections with peninsular India occurred due to fluctuations in the sea level, the large
stretch of dry lowlands in the north and northcentral parts of the island together with the
high mountains (over 2500 m) in the south central region would have continued to act as
barriers to the exchange of biota between southwest Sri Lanka and the subcontinent. The
faunal species in the wet southwest of the country are equally divided between the low and
mid-country and the submontane and montane areas. The property constitutes three areas
Stemonoporus
Stemonoporus
Stemonoporus
S. affinis
Eugenia
Stemonoporus
Syzygium
S. oliganthum
S. turbinatum
Memecylon
Calophyllum
C. walkeri
C. trapezifolium,
C. zeylanicum
C. cuneifolium
Calophyllum
.
83
3. Justification for Inscription

that are still in a near pristine condition and serving as the refuge for the large number of
endemic fauna of the mountain region.
The three constituents of the property between them have recorded 408 species of
vertebrates, of which 141 are endemic, and many of these are strictly montane species. The
highest levels of endemicity are among the fishes, amphibians and reptiles. Eighty-three
per cent of the indigenous fresh water fish and 81% of the amphibians in PWPA are
endemic; 91% of the amphibians and 89% of the reptiles in HPNP are endemic; 64% of the
amphibians and 51% of the reptiles in KCF are endemic.
PWPA and HPNP are contiguous areas whereas KCF is separated from the other two by a
relativlely low-lying valley stretching over several kilometres. This isolation has led to
some remarkable cases of allopatric speciation.
, an endemic genus, has one
species
in Knuckles and another
in PWPA. Another
example is the endemic agamid lizard genus
.
, is confined to
Knuckles and
to PWPA and other parts of the Central Massif. Interestingly,
the three other species of the genus have different patterns of distribution
in the
southern Rakwana range, which is distinct from the Central Massif, and also in some parts
of PWPA; and
and
.
in the eastern section of Sinharaja (De Silva et al.
2005d).The case of the genus
is also interesting. The recently described rare
species
is confined to Knuckles while
is more widespread
and is found in the Central Massif.
KCF, in particular, with its rugged and highly dissected terrain and wide range of climatic
and other site conditions offers numerous opportunities for habitat partitioning. Sympatric
speciation is seen among several taxa. It is not surprising that of the 204 forests of over 200
ha in the island that have been surveyed for biodiversity in a National Conservation review,
Knuckles stands out as the forest with the highest level of faunal biodiversity (IUCN &
WCMC 1997).
The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka, concentrated in a very small fraction of the island's
land area, and with mountains going up to over 2500 m, present landscapes and views of
exceptional natural beauty. The view from Adam's Peak in PWPA, particularly at the break
of dawn, presents a breathtaking spectacle that has been described in superlative terms by
several visitors in their published works. In Horton Plains, at “World's End” one looks
down over a near vertical escarpment approaching 1000 m and the view extends across the
plains to the Indian Ocean beyond. KCF is in a rugged mountain range with 35 peaks.
Rocky escarpments, a major land form in the Knuckles, fall hundreds of metres almost
vertically, offering a spectacular view.
At present there are six cultural sites from Sri Lanka inscribed in the World Heritage list (in
addition to a single natural site). They are:
Sacred City of Anuradhapura
Ancient City of Polonnaruwa
Ancient City of Sigiriya
Golden Temple of Dambulla
Sacred City of Kandy
Nannophrys
N.
marmorata
N. ceylonensis
Ceratophora C. tennentii
C. stoddartii
C. aspera
C. erdeleni
C karu
Cophotis
Cophotis dumbarae
C. ceylanica
3. c Comparative analysis
3. c. 1 Cultural Heritage
PWPA
?
84
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Old City of Galle and its fortifications
The sacred mountain of Adam's Peak with the indentation resembling a footprint at its
summit is a distinctive heritage of outstanding universal value. It has been held in
veneration by four great religions of the world, namely, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism
and Islam. Its religious cum cultural significance dates back to pre-Christian times, and its
link with the country's Buddhist civilization in particular has continued throughout the
ages right up to the present time. Today, annually, around two million people climb the
mountain and visit the Peak. The large majority of them are devotees, but a good many
make the climb to experience the incomparable sight from the mountain top. These
features set Adam's Peak apart from the other cultural sites in Sri Lanka inscribed in the
World Heritage List.
Buddhist monuments and other places of worship bearing the stamp of a world heritage are
found in other countries such as India and Nepal. Adam's Peak, however, has many
distinctive and unique features not shared by those sites. These include the many
centuries-old cultural practices being followed by the hundreds of thousands of devotees
that climb the peak every year to venerate the sacred footprint.
The precursor to the investigations at HPNP was the extensive archaeological studies that
were carried out over the island, the results of which have been published in several
scientific papers ably documented in the monumental work of Deraniyagala (1992). Many
sites in different parts of the island were explored and found to have ample evidence of the
presence of prehistoric man during various periods since 34,000 years BP. One of these
sites is Batadomba-lena (
=cave) in the lowlands and close to the foothills of PWPA
and HPNP. Here skeletal remains of cave-dwelling humans dating back to 28,500 years BP
were discovered. These individuals were assigned to the subspecies
, and referred to as the “Balangoda Man”. Among the other discoveries
were geometric microliths, charcoal, and faunal remains (28,500-12,000 years BP)
indicating that these prehistoric humans were hunter gatherers who would have used fire
to burn the forest and drive out animals. The evidence unraveled from the investigations at
Horton Plains regarding the prehistoric culture that existed there meshes closely with the
considerable body of information that had emerged from earlier investigations elsewhere
in the island. It is most likely that Balangoda Man was the first colonizer of the high plains.
In the global context, the origin of agriculture, which marks the dawn of a new era in the
history of man, the Neolithic revolution, dates back to 14,000 - 10,000 years BP. East
Asian sites (e.g. Xianrendong in China) have yielded evidence of rice-based subsistence
patterns since 14,000 years BP (Yan 1997, Shen & Crawford 1998, Toyama 2001), In
southwestern Asia (e.g. Abu Hureyra), in Eupharates, and in the Ghaba valley in northwest
Syria evidence was found of systematic cereal cultivation since 13,000 years BP (Hillman
et al. 2001). Siliceous microfossil evidence indicates that early agriculture appeared in the
New World in 10,000 years BP (Bryant 2003). Until recently, the available evidence
suggested that the number of places where the practice of agriculture originated
independently was restricted to five major regions of the world - West Asia, South-east
Asia, South China, Meso-America, and West Africa.
The results of exhaustive research carried out by scientists of the Post graduate Institute of
Archaeology of the Kelaniya University, Sri Lanka, and the Department of Quaternary
·
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə