Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə12/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   24

HPNP
lena
Homo sapiens
balangodensis
85
3. Justification for Inscription

Geology, Stockholm University, Sweden, have revealed that agriculture had flourished in
Horton Plains 13,000 years ago and that this region witnessed the development of the
world's earliest human civilization based on rice, oat and barley cultivation dating back to
more than 15,000 years BP. This evidence undoubtedly makes South Asia an important
centre where the Neolithic or farming culture originated.
The cultural aspects of KCF relate to the discovery of caves, which, according to
preliminary evidence from artifacts (stone tools), were occupied by Mesolithic man. That
this was so is supported by the available body of information on the widespread
distribution of prehistoric man in Sri Lanka (De Silva et al. 2005b). A characteristic feature
of these caves is the presence of drip ledges chiseled into the overhanging brow of the rock
to divert rainwater from the entrance (
.). This was probably done long after the caves
were abandoned by prehistoric man and are provisionally dated as post 300 BC. The caves
were at that time occupied by Buddhist monks, a practice that still continues in some caves
Section 2 (Description) and Section 3.a (Criteria under which inscription is proposed and
justification for inscription under these criteria) of this nomination provide information on
the unique and exceptional natural features of the nominated property, and such
information, directly or by implication, define the features that distinguish the property
from other comparable ecosystems. The present section will restrict itself to some salient
features that show similarities with other biogeographic regions as well as those that set the
property apart from other comparable sites.
The nominated property falls within a small, but exclusive, component of the world's
rainforest biome and is called the
. The exclusive nature of this
component of the rainforest biome derives from the geological history of the island starting
at the time when it was an indistinguishable and small part of the giant continent of
Gondwanaland. This continent included what is today South America, Africa,
Madagascar, parts of southern Europe and Arabia, India, Australia and Antarctica. The
splitting up of Gondwanaland took place after the appearance of flowering plants and
therefore the current characteristics and distribution of these taxa would be a good basis for
an analysis of comparable sites within the rainforest system. With the fragmentation of
Gondwanaland and the progressive separation of its parts in post-Jurassic periods, one
would generally expect the relationship of taxa between the sections that drifted apart in
earlier periods and remained so to be more tenuous and phylogenetically more distant
compared to those between the parts of Gondwanaland that stayed together until more
recent geological periods. Hence, the relationship between the biota of Madagascar and
Africa will be more distant than between Sri Lanka and the Indian sub-continent. In the
case of the former, the similarities are mostly at the suprageneric level.
The angiosperm family Monimiaceae of gondwanic origin, which is well represented in
South America and Australia-New Guinea, has three endemic genera in Madagascar and a
single endemic genus in Sri Lanka. With the exception of a single genus in the rainforests
of West Africa, the family appears to have become extinct over most of Africa (Ashton &
Gunatillleke 1987a). Notably, also, it has disappeared from the Indian peninsula
The family Dipterocarpaceae is pantropical, with two separate subfamilies: the
·
Knuckles KCF
.
3. c. 2 Natural Heritage
ibid
Ceylonese Rainforest
86
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Monotoideae in northern South America, tropical Africa and the Seychelles, and the
Dipterocarpoideae in Asia. Affinities between the two subfamilies and Sarcolaenaceae
suggest common ancestry. The two groups giving rise to the two subfamilies would have
separated with the separation of the Madagascar and India land masses. (Ducousso et al.
2004).
We now turn our attention to the rainforests (outside Sri Lanka) of the Indomalayan realm
(the
,
, and
) which have much closer links,
geographically, to the Ceylonese Rainforest than those of the African region.
The subfamily Monotoideae of the Dipterocarpaceae, already referred to above, has been
placed in a separate family Monotaceae by some taxonomists (e.g. Kostermans 1992), and
the subfamily Dipterocarpoideae upgraded as the family Dipterocarpaceae. In this sense,
the Dipterocarpaceae is entirely restricted to tropical Asia (with the exception of
in the Seychelles). There are 14 genera and c. 470 species distributed in Sri
Lanka, India, Bangladesh, Burma, South China, Thailand, Indochina, Malaysia,
Indonesia, the Philippines and New Guinea (Kostermans 1992). Sri Lanka has nine
genera, of which
and
are endemic. There are 58 species, all of which
are endemic, showing a degree of speciation that is quite remarkable for such a small
rainforest system. Throughout its range the family covers seasonal and aseasonal climates;
in Sri Lanka it is mainly found in the aseasonal rainforest. An exceptional and unique
feature for a dipterocarp is that the endemic
has several of its 26 species at
submontane and montane elevations (>1000m above msl).
In the predominantly southern and Asiatic family Myrtaceae,
and
are
well represented in South Asia. There has been a high degree of speciation within Sri
Lanka; there are 11 species of
, of which eight are endemic. One of the
nonendemics,
found in Sri Lanka at high elevations on rocky and
exposed locations in KCF also occurs in Mauritius and Reunion (Dassanayake & Fosberg
1981). There are 26 species of
in the island, of which 14 are endemic. Of the non-
endemic species, the majority are confined to Sri Lanka and southern India and/or the
Western Ghats. There are, however, several that have a wider distribution. These are .
(Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Burma, western Malaysia),
(Sri Lanka,
peninsular India, western Malaysia),
(Sri Lanka, India, South China, Malaysia
and the Pacific), .
(Sri Lanka, SE Asia, India) .
(Sri Lanka,
western Malaysia, southern India) (Dassanayake & Fosberg 1981). The genus
, with a single nonendemic species in Sri Lanka, extends to East Asia and
Australia (Ashton & Gunatilleke 1987a).
In the Clusiaceae, all the major Asian rainforest genera occur in Sri Lanka, including three
sections of the large pantropical genus
.
The Fagaceae, whose centre of diversity is in the Himalayas and the Far East and has
spread throughout the region and reached New Guinea, is remarkably absent from
southern India and Sri Lanka.
In this comparative analysis we now turn our attention specifically to Sri Lanka's nearest
geographic neighbour, India. Sri Lanka has been separated from India as a distinct entity
since around the mid-Miocene. There have, however, been short, intermittent land
connections between South India and northwest Sri Lanka up to the Holocene due to
oscillations in sea level. In a study by Abeywickrama (1956), he indicated that of 171
angiosperm families in the island, only four were non-peninsular. The four are
Malayan Indomalayan
Indochinese Rainforests
Vateriopsis
Doona
Stemonoporus
Stemonoporus
Eugenia
Syzygium
Eugenia
Eugenia cotinifolia,
Syzygium
S
aqueum
S. zeylanicum
S. cumini
S operculatum
S caryophyllatum
Rhodomyrtus
Garcinia
87
3. Justification for Inscription

Monimiaceae, Nepenthaceae (with one species), Stylidiaceae (with one species) and
Cactaceae. He further comments that Stylidiaceae and Cactaceae are doubtfully native to
Sri Lanka. This means that, at the family level, the angiosperms have overwhelmingly
close affinities with India.
Sri Lanka's wet zone which is under consideration in this nomination has its parallel
ecosystem in the Malabar tract and the Western Ghats of India (the
),
around 400 km away. Many of the physical and biological features of these two parallel
systems have been described as being strikingly similar (Mittermeir et al. 2000 as cited in
Pethiyagoda 2005b). The rainforests of the Western Ghats extend as a narrow coastal strip
along a stretch of 1600 km, from near the southern tip of India northward to Gujarat. The
close links between India and Sri Lanka at the family level of the angiosperms relate
mainly to this tract of forest.
Mention needs to be made of the existence of frost hardy grassland flora in Horton Plains,
one of the constituents of the serial property being nominated. These species, with a few
exceptions, are Himalayan in origin. How did these species arrive at Sri Lanka and the
Nilgiris of South India? It could be by way of a corridor or “stepping stones” bearing a
moist climate and light frost, at times when the climatic conditions were favourable for
such migration (Ashton & Gunatilleke 1987a).
Despite the affinity that exists between the biota of Sri Lanka and those of India, there are
distinct differences that are most pronounced at the species and intra-specific levels. The
study referred to earlier (Abeywickrama 1956) revealed that out of 1065 native genera of
angiosperms, 96 are non-peninsular. Of the 2855 species recorded, 853 were endemics,
and of the non-endemics 161 are non-peninsular. Many of the non-peninsular genera and
some of the non-peninsular species found in Sri Lanka may have been present in India but
would have disappeared due perhaps to changing climatic conditions in the peninsular
region. The majority of the endemics are the result of speciation within the island during
the period of geographic isolation of its rainforest system. The very high level of
endemicity among the species of fauna and flora of the wet zone of Sri Lanka coupled with
their highly localized occurrence is the most
of this fragment of the
world's rainforest biome.
Molecular analysis of Indian and Sri Lankan uropeltid snakes, caecilians, shrub frogs of
the genus
, freshwater fishes (
spp.) and fresh water crabs and atyid
shrimps have revealed that biotic exchange between the mainland and insular faunas of Sri
Lanka had been extremely limited during the last 500,000 years (Bossuyt et al. 2004,
Manamendra-Arachchi & Pethiyagoda 2005), making southwest Sri Lanka a “hotspot
within a hotspot” (Pethiyagoda 2005b).
Sri Lanka and southwest peninsular India share species with common ancestry. An
example is the three Sri Lankan species
,
and
(all found in the nominated property) and the three counterpart
species in southwest India:
and
respectively.
Also, there are many mammal species that are common to Sri Lanka and southwest
peninsular India which, however, are different at the subspecies level (Groves & Meijaard
2005). For example, the
subspecies that occurs in the property
and elsewhere in the island is different to the subspecies in India (
.). Another
interesting example is the case of the leopard. The Sri Lankan endemic subspecies
Malabar Rainforest
distinctive feature
Philautus
Punctius
Semnopithecus vetulus Macaca sinica
Pradoxurus zeylonensis
S. johnii, M. radiata
P. jerdoni
Prionailurus rubiginosus
ibid
88
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Panthera pardus kotiya
Cyrtodactylus
Stemonoporus
which ranges within the nominated property has been isolated from
the mainland leopard since the end of the Pleistocene, some 10,000 years ago (Bossuyt et al.
2004). Among the geckos, there are distinct differences between the Sri Lankan genus
and the Indian species of this genus (Batuwita & Bahir 2005).
The Ceylonese Rainforest is confined to the wet zone, which is situated in the southwest
quarter of the island. Although once extensive within this area, the intact natural forests
have been reduced to patches numbering over a hundred due to widespread deforestation
over the past two centuries. This is the most heavily populated part of the country, and the
forests are surrounded by villages or by tea and rubber plantations. Very few of these forests
exceed 2000 ha in area. Fortunately due to recent legal and administrative measures
deforestation in the wet zone has to a considerable extent been arrested.
Sri Lanka's rainforest ecosystem is rich in biodiversity, and a high proportion of its fauna
and flora are endemic. This ecosystem has two distinct elements the lowland and mid-
elevation forests and the submontane and montane forests. The former is uniquely
represented by the Sinharaja forest, with an area of over 11,000 ha. Its outstanding universal
value has been recognized and it has been inscribed on the World Heritage List.
The endemic biota in the rainforest ecosystem is almost equally divided between the
lowland and mid-elevation forests taken together and the submontane and montane forests.
The occurrence of many of these species is highly localized and they show altitudinal
variation in their distribution. This is distinctly seen in the case of the endemic dipterocarp
whose 26 species show a localized distribution throughout the lowland and
montane rainforests. In the faunal groups many species are restricted in their distribution to
the submontane and montane zones. The concentration of half of the island's endemic biota
in the mountainous region contributes to making the property one of considerable
importance in terms of outstanding universal value.
Although the montane and submontane forests have not suffered deforestation to the same
extent as the lowland forests in the wet zone, many of the remaining forests in the
mountainous areas have been subject to degradation primarily due to illicit removal of
timber and firewood. Many of these forests adjoin tea estates and the estate workers have for
many decades been extracting firewood, poles, etc. from the forest for their domestic use
causing serious degradation over time. People from the neighbouring villages also trek into
the forest to collect such forest produce. A notable example of forest degradation from these
activities is the Pedro forest reserve where the highest mountain in the island is located.
Another form of degradation, to which some sections of one of the constituents of the serial
property had been subject, is under-brushing and planting with cardamom. This practice has
now been banned. The nominated property is the largest stretch of natural montane
ecosystem which is still intact to a large extent and where strict protective measures will be
imposed.
The nominated property includes three constituents so as to capture, as far as possible, the
full range of biodiversity in the montane and submontane rainforests that spread over an
altitudinal range of over 1500 m and where there is disjunct occurrence of species and an
isolation barrier between the Central Massif and the Knuckles Massif.
3. d Integrity and authenticity
3. d. 1 Cultural features
89
3. Justification for Inscription

·
·
·
PWPA
HPNP
KCF
The cultural features of PWPA are largely confined to the cultural zone (the peak and the
pilgrim trails). The centre of attention is the indentation atop the Peak resembling a
human footprint which is considered to be of profound religious significance. The
authenticity of the religious monument on the Peak is established mainly through an
almost unbroken tradition dating back to the pre-Christian era and recorded in the
chronicle, the Mahawamsa (Anon. 545 BC-1758 AD). The sacred Peak was at various
times associated with the four great religions of the world: Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism
and Christianity, but the strongest attachment has been and continues to be to the
Buddhist faith. Traditional Hindu rites are, however, also performed by the Buddhist
pilgrims who visit the Peak, and this practice dates back to very ancient times.
Historically, several reigning monarchs had made a pilgrimage to the Peak (see section
2.b.1). James Legge's translation of the Chinese publication by the Buddhist monk Fa
Hien titled Travels in India and Ceylon 393-414 AD records the monk's visit to Adam's
Peak and his interpretation of the origin of the foot print. Ibn Batuta's visit to Adam's
Peak in the 14 century is referred to by Emerson Tennent (1859). Marco Polo, in the 13
century, who went up to the Peak, refers to the chains that had been installed for helping
the pilgrims to climb the mountain.
There is indeed a wealth of information regarding the veneration of the shrine at the Peak
which now draws pilgrims in large numbers both from within the country as well as from
other countries where devotion to Buddhism is practised.
While prior studies had revealed the presence of prehistoric man at Horton Plains
through the evidence of geometric microliths and other artifacts, the authenticity of
occupation and cultivation of sites at Horton Plains by Mesolithic man has been recently
established through new evidence. According to the latest findings of radio-carbon
dated multi-proxy records prehistoric humans occupied Horton Plains as early as 24,000
years BP. Pollen analysis shows a sequence of cultivation starting from the growing of
oat and barley leading to the cultivation of rice when the climatic conditions became
more humid. The research work was carried out by Sri Lankan scientists in collaboration
with the Department of Quaternary Geology of the University of Stockholm.
References have been provided in the earlier sections of this nomination.
The gazette notification declaring the Knuckles conservation area as a Conservation
Forest unambiguously states that only state-owned land within the demarcated
boundary is considered a part of the Knuckles Conservation Forest. Most of the village
communities are located outside the boundary or have moved outside from within the
boundary. There are, however, some village communities that still remain within the
demarcated boundary. Some of these communities have been provisionally identified
with a view to selecting a few ancient houses and other structures for protection and
conservation as cultural monuments. This will obviously have to be done with the
cooperation of the households concerned. One of the villages identified is Meemure
(See map).
Caves inhabited by Mesolithic cave-dwelling humans are known from various parts of
the island (Deraniyagala 1992, Kennedy & Deraniyagala 1989). Human remains and
Mesolithic tools have been recovered from a number of caves, notably Fa-Hien lena,
th
th
90
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Batadomba lena, Beli-lena, Alu-lena. The material evidence examined and tested at
Cornell University, USA, by Professor Kennedy has confirmed that the civilization of Sri
Lanka runs back to 29,000 30,000 years BP. The anatomically modern prehistoric
humans in Sri Lanka, collectively referred to as Balangoda man, appear to have settled in
practically every nook and corner of Sri Lanka.
In the context of these findings the recent discovery of caves in Knuckles with Mesolithic
artifacts strongly suggests that the caves were used by prehistoric man dating from the
same period as those in the other described sites. An innovation found here, which can
only be attributed to more recent
times, is the existence of drip ledges
on the overhanging rock-face to
divert rainwater away from the
entrance. It is provisionally
suggested that these drip ledges were
constructed about 200 BC and that
the caves abandoned by Mesolithic
man were, many centuries later,
occupied by Buddhist monks.
Archaeological work is being carried
out at these sites by the Post-
graduate Institute of Archaeology in
the University of Peradeniya.
3. d. 2
By world standards, the nominated
serial property is very small. Its three
components are: PWPA and HPNP,
taken together because they are
contiguous (23,705 ha), and the
Knuckles Conservation
Forest (31,305 ha). They are the least disturbed
and largest of the residual areas of submontane
and montane rainforest in the island. These
forests are the refuge of a rare assemblage of
endemic biota whose ancestors have survived in
a perhumid climate through a long geological
history dating back to the late Cretaceous. Many
of the plants and animals have a highly localized
distribution and show distinct signs of allopatric
and sympatric speciation. Many of the endemic
faunal species that are restricted to these areas
are small animals with restricted areas of
occupancy, and the property, if well protected,
would be adequate to ensure survival.
Natural features
The endemic Sri
Lanka yellow-eared
bulbul (
Above
and the endemic Sri
Lanka flame-striped
jungle squirrel
found at all
three sites.
Pycnonotus
penicillatus) (
)
(Funambulus
layardi)
91
3. Justification for Inscription
© Samantha Mirandu
© Rahula Perera
The Critically Endangered and endemic
Das's dwarf toad
a point
endemic in the buffer zone of the PWPA
(Adenomus dasi),
© Wildlife Heritage Trust

PWPA and HPNP are contiguous and, furthermore, there are other protected forests
adjacent to these two components of the property which would serve as buffers and
provide extended habitats for the biota within the property. Very recently a biodiversity
baseline survey was carried out in PWPA and HPNP and the data would serve as a
benchmark for monitoring future changes in species composition.
The outstanding universal value of the property in relation to its natural features will be
adequately safeguarded through the strict conservation measures that are being adopted.
At the same time research will be promoted as there is still much to learn regarding the
unique biota in this area as has already been seen from the recently concluded
biodiversity base line survey (DWLC 2007)
.
The elephant is today predominantly a dry zone species and the few animals which range
into the property could not be considered in isolation as a viable population.
Several parts of the property come under the control of the Forest Department. Up to the
early 1990s, the primary focus of the Forest Ordinance and its implementing agency was
the prevention of illicit logging and unauthorized removal of other forest products while
making provision for the sustained supply of timber to meet the nation's demands. With
the steep rise in demand, timber felling in the state forests escalated and what was once a
conservative system of selective felling grew out of hand and resulted in the severe
depletion of selected species in many of the natural forests. The first forestry master plan,
published in 1986, was roundly condemned by scientists, environmentalists and the
informed public for its recommendations to increase further the supply of timber from
state forests. The master plan was abandoned and a new plan produced in 1995. The focus
of the new forestry master plan was completely different. Its first objective is: To
conserve forests for posterity, with particular regard to biodiversity, soils, water, and
historical, cultural, religious and aesthetic values.
Following the 1995 forestry sector master plan, a series of policy and legal decisions
were taken to establish and maintain the integrity of forests particularly those selected for
their conservation value.
The serial property now nominated has three constituents: the Peak Wilderness Protected
Area (PWPA) the Horton Plains National Park (HPNP) and the Knuckles Conservation
Forest (KCF).
What was, until very recently, the Peak Wilderness Sanctuary consisted of a confused
mix of different sections under the control of the FD and DWLC, with some of the
sections overlapping. It was understood that unless the confusion is resolved and the area
to be nominated clearly defined and given strict legal protection it would not be possible
to make a case for justifying the nomination of the peak wilderness area for inclusion as a
World Heritage despite the outstanding cultural and natural features that it possessed.
Accordingly action was taken (a) to declare the sections under the charge of the Forest
Department as conservation forests (which gives them the highest level of protection
under the provisions of the Forest Ordinance), (b) to allow the pilgrim trails and the peak
to remain in the status of a sanctuary so as to provide pilgrims free access to the peak, and
(c) leaving out the conservation forests, the pilgrim trails and the peak, to declare the
other intact areas of natural forest within the Peak Wilderness Sanctuary as a nature
reserve under the provisions of the Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance. The integrity
of PWPA is now firmly established. It comprises the three conservation forests, the
92
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

nature reserve and the pilgrim trails and peak.
As regards the division of PWPA into sections under the control of the FD and DWLC, it is
important to note here that such a division is purely a historical matter. There is no
distinction in terms of ecosystem structure and composition that would serve to distinguish
the three areas under the charge of the Forest Department and the adjoining area under the
control of the Department of Wildlife Conservation. In other words there is no discernible
difference in terms of the ecosystem as to where one ends and the other begins between the
different components of PWPA. Very often, district and provincial boundaries and physical
features such as waterways were used to mark the boundaries of forest reserves.
HPNP is under the control of DWLC. Its integrity is well established. No encroachments
have occurred and action to maintain the integrity of the area is in place.
In the Knuckles Conservation Forest, there had been, to start with, cardamom cultivation in
limited areas under the authority of permits issued by the Forest Department. This practice
had got out of hand and cultivation spread illicitly. That was prior to the 1980s at a time
when the conservation value of the Knuckles was not properly recognized. Since then
permits were cancelled and the practice was banned. Legal action was taken against
encroachers and illicit cultivators and the protected area was increased in size prior to being
gazetted as a Conservation Forest. At present protective measures are being strictly
enforced while community participation is obtained for promoting conservation and eco-
tourism activities by the Forest Department.
In PWPA and KCF small patches had earlier been planted with exotic forest species notably
of
and
. This was done several years back with a view to
turning patches of degraded scrubland to productive forest. These small blocks within the
property will not be commercially managed but they would be felled as soon as possible
and the areas left to nature for ecological restoration.
Pinus, Albizia, Acacia
Eucalyptus
93
3. Justification for Inscription
1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə