Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə13/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   24

4. State of Conservation and factors affecting the property
4.a Present State of Conservation
4.a. 1 PWPA
The culture-related area within the PWPA consists of the sacred peak and six, 50-metre
wide, pilgrim trails leading up to the peak from the foothills of the range. While there is no
threat to the condition of the peak, the conservation status of the pilgrim trails is directly
related to the mass scale use of these tracks during the pilgrim season. Every year prior to
the onset of the pilgrim season (which is from December to May) the District Secretary (in
the provincial administration) issues licenses to over 100 traders to put up sales outlets for
food items and other necessities to cater to the huge influx of pilgrims. They construct
temporary structures with poles cut from the adjoining forest. They also collect firewood
from these forests for cooking. To quote from the updated management plan (DWLC 2005)
“The exact extent of forest degradation is difficult to assess. The strips of land on either
side of the trails to the peak are very badly degraded, beyond the possibility of any
restoration, especially close to the boutiques”. Some measures have been adopted to
address this issue (e.g. for the food sales units to use gas for cooking), but more needs to be
done. This matter will receive the attention of DWLC in collaboration with the cultural
sector institutions and the local administration.
Another conservation problem is the disposal of garbage (mainly polythene food-
wrappers). Much has been done to address the problem, and now a good part of the garbage
is dumped into bins or taken back with the pilgrims. The sheer numbers using the trails,
however, mean that even with a small percentage of them ignoring the garbage disposal
instructions, this continues to remain a major issue. Another problem is the absence of
adequate toilet facilities, as a result of which the neighboring forest is often used by
pilgrims for toilet purposes. While some action has been taken to address these issues,
more will be done to mitigate environmental damage.
According to statistics 10-20 % of the visitors are tourists. Quite a number of them visit the
peak during the off season. Some of them collect plants and faunal species from the forest
causing threats to the biodiversity in this section of PWPA.
Though many of these conservation issues do not pose a direct threat to the cultural value
of the peak and its approach routes, they will be addressed as a matter of urgency in order to
restore this prime cultural cum religious site to a condition where its heritage value is seen
to be given full national recognition. They have also to be addressed in view of the
deleterious effects they have on the biodiversity of this rich forest and on the environment
as a whole in this part of the PWPA
In the redefinition of the composition of the PWPA, the culture-related areas (which
collectively form only a very small fraction of the protected area) remain in the status of a
sanctuary under the provisions of the FFPO. This category of wildlife reserve has the
lowest status as a protected area. No higher status could be accorded to these areas as there
has to be free access to the large numbers of pilgrims who visit the peak. The DWLC and
the appropriate culture-related institutions as well as the local authorities will, however,
exercise the greatest vigilance to ensure the conservation and protection of these areas.

Turning our attention to the natural heritage values in the areas outside the culture-related
sections, it was just recently, in readiness for making this proposal for nominating this area
for inscription on the World Heritage List, that the integrity of the PWPA was properly and
legally established.
Until very recently, what had been declared as the Peak Wilderness Sanctuary, which is a
protected area category under the control of the DWLC, had nevertheless included three
FD areas. While these three areas have been relatively well managed, with the Forest
Department enforcing the wide-ranging protective legislation embodied in the Forest
Ordinance, the remaining part of the Sanctuary did not receive anything like the same
degree of protection. While the DWLC concerned itself with protecting the wildlife, it was
the revenue officers that assumed control of the state land. It would be pertinent to quote
from the Management Plan for the Peak Wilderness Sanctuary (DWLC 1999a): “lands,
which are not owned by the Forest Department or private persons, are the property of the
revenue authorities, i.e. Divisional Secretaries. This is the reason why officials are able to
settle and regularize encroachments on the Sanctuary”.
Illicit gem mining, leading to environmental degradation since there is no ecological
restoration of the areas, is also taking place in some sections in the periphery of PWPA.
Action will be taken to stop this type of activity.
Large areas in the eastern part of what was the PWS contain village settlements, tea estates
and public utilities. Which of these were already in existence when the area was declared a
sanctuary and which had subsequently developed through encroachment into the state land
is not known. The DWLC had minimal control, if any, of this section of the sanctuary.
While the importance of Adam's Peak and its environs as a cultural heritage of outstanding
and enduring value dating back to over two millennia has always been known, the
exceptional natural heritage values have only recently become widely appreciated. Hence,
in order to give special protection to this area and to nominate it as a World Heritage with
outstanding universal value both in relation to cultural and natural features, the
government decided to reconstitute the area of state land within the PWS and upgrade its
legal status. In doing so the private lands, village settlements, etc. as well as the three FD
areas, the pilgrim trails and the peak were excluded and the balance declared as a nature
reserve under the FFPO. The FD areas, while forming a part of the PWPA, have also been
upgraded to the status of conservation forests, which is the highest category of protected
area under the provisions of the Forest Ordinance. The peak and the trails remain in the
status of sanctuary. Though the PWPA has not been legally defined as a unit, its different
parts have been legally constituted in a rational manner and in doing so their status as
protected areas has been enhanced. (For more information on the composition of the
PWPA see Section 2.b.2).
With the exclusion of the non-forest areas from the newly defined boundary of what is now
the PWPA, it could be said that the state of conservation of the area is satisfactory. With the
enhanced legal powers given to the DWLC to protect the area as a nature reserve, suitable
action will be taken to prevent encroachments and other illegal activities such as gem
mining.
Surveys of the biota of PWPA have been few and far between and very limited in scope
(such as the survey of woody plants in relatively small sample areas). However, using the
available data and information obtained from the recently concluded biodiversity baseline
96
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

survey in PWPA and HPNP among other places, it is possible to provide data on species
that would provisionally serve as indicators to assess future trends. Using the criteria of
being common or rather rare, the following species have been tentatively named as
indicator plant species for the submontane forests:
,
and
(Jayasuriya et al.
1993). Among the faunal species, two small mammals,
and
have been provisionally named as potential indicators of habitat
quality (Wijesinghe 2007). It must be noted that more indicator species are bound to come
to light in the future as research continues.
In addition to keeping track of indicator species, the maintenance of the integrity of the
ecosystem, free of encroachments and other malpractices that cause damage to the
biodiversity of the property, is of the utmost importance. In this respect, the main
benchmark as far as the PWPA is concerned relates to the establishment and maintenance
of its boundaries and keeping the area within the boundaries free of encroachments and
other illegal activities.
The Horton Plains area was first declared as a Nature Reserve under the provisions of the
Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance in 1969, and subsequently, in 1988, re-designated as
a National Park. It is under the control of the Department of Wildlife Conservation. The
area is well managed and free of the conservation issues that plague many of the other
protected areas in the country. Its topographical features give it natural protection and the
area is free of encroachment problems. The cultural value of the site is not overtly evident
in that the information regarding the occupation of the area during Mesolithic times comes
mainly from deep borings into the peat and soil.
The natural heritage features, which are the spectacular landscape of this high-elevation,
mist shrouded tableland and the incomparable “World's End” with its breath-taking view,
and of course the park's biodiversity, are generally in a good state of conservation. There
are, however some problems that have to be addressed. Some activities of tourists, such as
the damaging of information boards and the collection of plants, have to be eliminated.
Man-made fires also occur from time to time. Stiff penalties should be imposed on those
who commit offences in terms of the Fauna and Flora Ordinance. Warning notices are
prominently displayed to give adequate notice to the public. But this alone does not seem to
suffice. Illicit gem mining which is taking place in PWPA extends to some sections
bordering Horton Plains. The DWLC will be extra vigilant to apprehend offenders and take
legal action.
A threat to the biodiversity of HPNP can arise from the spread of the invasive species
. This has to be closely watched and effective action taken if the problem gets
aggravated.
As indicators of habitat quality the following faunal species have been provisionally
selected:
, the otter
, the highland shrew
, the
bicoloured rat
, and the golden palm civet
(Wijesinghe 2007). The herbivore
(sambur) and the carnivore
(leopard) may be considered as keystone species.
Aglaia apiocarpa Cinnamomum
litseafolium, Elaeocarpus glandulifer
Palaquium hinmolpedda
Srilankamys ohiensis
Funambulus layardi
Ulex
europaeus
Loris tardigradus
Lutra lutra
Suncus montanus
Srilankamys ohiensis
Paradoxurus zeylonensis
Cervus unicolor
Panthera
pardus kotiya
4. a. 2 HPNP
97
4. State of Conservation and factors affecting the property

4. a. 3 KCF
4. b Factors affecting the Property
(i) Development Pressures
PWPA
Hitherto the cultural value of some of the sites in this forest was known only to a few
scientists that had explored the area. These sites are now recognized as cultural zones so
that protective measures could be designed and implemented as a collaborative effort of
the Forest Department and the Department of Archaeology. The field staff speaks of the
existence of more sites of archaeological interest than those that have been officially
reported on. While the state of conservation of the sites is considered satisfactory, there is a
great deal of scope for further studies. In granting permission for archaeological research
to be carried out, the Forest Department and the Department of Archaeology will take steps
to see that only professionally qualified archaeologists are allowed to carry out
investigations.
What had posed a problem in the past in relation to the conservation of the unique
ecosystem of KCF was the cultivation of cardamom. This spice crop was under-planted in
some sections of the natural forest under a lease-agreement scheme initiated by the FD
many decades ago. What started on a small scale extended beyond the leased areas.
Maintenance work to sustain the cardamom crop resulted in a degradation of the natural
forest. Several measures were taken by the Forest Department to eliminate this threat. The
lease agreements were terminated. All resident cultivators were evacuated and located
elsewhere. The areas that were under-planted by these cultivators are now seen to be
reverting to their natural forest state, and this ecological process is most prominent in
places where the cardamom has been cut back. Eleven of the former non-resident and
influential lessees continue to harvest cardamom from the land using hired labour, in spite
of the expiry of their leases. Legal action has been taken against them. Court orders have
been given to enforce the stoppage of their illegal activity, but up to now, success has not
been achieved in implementing the court decision. This is a matter that will receive priority
attention.
The boundary of KCF is highly convoluted and crosses very rugged terrain. In some areas
the boundary is not clear. Action would be taken to identify such sections and put up clearly
visible boundary markers.
The development pressure that militates against the protection of the routes leading to the
summit arises from the mass scale of visits to the peak and the inadequate measures for
coping with the attendant problems such as sanitation, environmental pollution, the
construction of trade stalls annually just prior to the onset of the pilgrim season using poles
cut from the forest, and the cutting of firewood from the forest for cooking. Another
activity that has to be curbed is the collection of plants and small animals from the
adjoining forest for sale locally and sometimes for export.
, a montane
tree species, is much sought after and its bark is cut away to remove strips for use in the
treatment of respiratory ailments. This is a widespread practice within the PWPA. Action
will be taken to stop this activity in the protected area.
·
Kokoona zeylanica
98
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Once the pilgrim season is over i.e. from June until November the visitors to the Peak are
mainly tourists. The ministry in charge of the environment and the DWLC should consider
the possibility of charging a fee from visitors during this period and reserving the funds so
collected for supporting the maintenance of the pilgrim trails.
In what was the Peak Wilderness Sanctuary, particularly along its southern boundary and
in its eastern section development pressures (land settlement, village expansion,
encroachments, etc.) had resulted in the erosion of the protected area. With the district
revenue officers exercising greater control over the land than the DWLC, they were able to
regularize encroachments within the sanctuary. According to the field staff of both the
DWLC and FD, large sections of the PWS in its eastern half have been converted into
village settlements, with schools, shops and other public utilities. Tea estates were also
found within this area.
This problem has now been resolved.
have been
declared as the Peak Wilderness (
) Nature Reserve and included within
PWPA.
Although, under the proposed scheme two different government departments will share
control of PWPA, the areas falling within the control of each department will be distinct
from each other. Also, the upgrading of the area falling within the control of DWLC that
warrants strict protection from that of Sanctuary to Nature Reserve will give the
department much greater authority to enforce protective measures. Reducing the area of
control under DWLC to that of the nature reserve and placing the areas directly under its
charge with no interference from the district agencies should enable the department to
harness its resources in order to protect this area.effectively.
The focus of attention in PWPA is the peak itself, and at present there are only a few if any
visitors wanting to experience the biodiversity-rich natural forest. Attracting visitors to the
natural forest areas for study and observation would be encouraged and the village
communities invited to take an active part in conservation of the forest as has been done in
KCF. As a first step, nature trails will to be opened; these
This is in order to ensure that the
use of nature trails is controlled, which will not be possible if the nature trails are linked
with or are in proximity to the pilgrim trails. Guides would be provided for accompanying
tour parties along the nature trails
Proposals had been made to set up a visitor centre and sales centre at the start of two pilgrim
trails under the PAM & WLC project. Fortunately, the proposal has been dropped. Having
a visitor centre to cater to a handful of tourists at the start of a route used by many hundreds
of people who climb the mountain daily to worship at the shrine would have hurt the
sensibilities of the pilgrims. Moreover, having visitor centres at these points would imply
that the visitors could use the pilgrim routes as nature trails and freely venture out into the
adjoining forests. Establishing a visitor centre, interpretation facilities, and a sales outlet at
the start of the nature trails once they are opened would be considered at a later stage as the
need for them grows. For a start, some basic facilities could be provided at the starting
points of the nature trails.
Only the intact areas of natural forest
Samanala Adaviya
will not be linked to the pilgrim
routes and would be located well away form these routes.
99
4. State of Conservation and factors affecting the property

·
·
·
·
HPNP
KCF
(ii) Environmental Pressures
PWPA
HPNP
No serious development pressures are envisaged in the Horton Plains National Park. The
environmental value of this area is too well recognized for events such as had occurred in
the past to re-surface. We are here referring to the ill-conceived decision by the government
at the time to take a section of the grassland area for cultivating potato, a scheme that has
long since been abandoned. A prevailing problem is the incidence of illicit gem mining. As
in the case of PWPA, measures will be adopted to stop this practice through legal means.
The cultural value of this site is still known only to the scientists in the relevant discipline.
Publicity will be given at the site so that the many visitors to Horton Plains will become
acquainted with the archaeological findings made here. With the growing popularity of this
site for tourists, both local and foreign, site deterioration is a potential danger that has to be
guarded against and effective measures adopted where necessary. As for presentation, the
cultural features that have come to light only recently would be given prominence at the
site to apprise the public of these remarkable discoveries.
The development pressures arising as a result of the Knuckles forest being an ideal
environment for the growing of cardamom is now a thing of the past. Experience has
shown that, initially, excellent crops of cardamom could be obtained, but in time the site
conditions deteriorate, primarily from the loss of humus and erosion of the top soil, and this
leads to a drop in yield. The end result, if this practice had continued, would have been that
the land would become degraded and be unable to support either crop or natural forest. The
practice of cardamom cultivation within the KCF has been nearly eliminated due to the
strict legal action taken by the FD, and many of the areas that were earlier under-planted
with cardamom have been left to nature for ecological restoration. Monitoring will be done
to check on the possible spread of invasive species into the gaps caused by the elimination
of cardamom.
A matter that will be a strong inducement for the conservation of the Knuckles forest is the
proposal to construct two reservoirs in the area down stream of the KCF. One is the Kalu
Ganga reservoir and the other, a large one, the Moragahakande reservoir. The KCF is the
major catchment that would have to be protected if the reservoirs are to be provided with a
steady flow of water.
No serious environmental pressures are envisaged
Environmental deterioration which has been observed in some parts of the montane forest
and is particularly evident in the forest areas of HPNP is forest dieback. Significant areas of
HPNP are subject to this phenomenon. Is this a natural phenomenon, or is it man-made?
Although speculative reasons have been offered by way of explanation, there is no
100
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

concrete evidence regarding the cause of the dieback. This matter calls for scientific
research to determine the cause.
Another problem that needs close watching is the spread of the invasive exotic gorse
species
Effective control measures would be adopted if the problem is
seen to get out of hand.
The montane forests of the KCF have adapted to the harsh conditions prevailing in some
parts of the range, namely the constantly prevailing gale force winds, by developing the
elfin and pygmy type of forest where the trees are of very low stature, around a metre in
height in the worst affected areas.
There are no foreseeable natural disasters that pose a threat to any of the three constituent
parts of the nominated property from natural causes.
The Peak, considered to be one of the holiest shrines by Buddhists, and also held sacred by
Hindus and Muslims, has an influx of pilgrims whose numbers may go up to two million a
year, and this is mainly in the pilgrim season which is restricted to around six months in the
year. Any environmental deterioration arising from such mass scale visits to the Peak
occurs adjacent to the trails. The cultural aspects of the site are not put at risk by the
magnitude of the visitor population. Apart from the influx of pilgrims, and some visits,
mainly by tourists in the off season, visits to the other parts of PWPA are almost negligible
(DWLC 1999a).
The influx of visitors to HPNP has grown in recent years. If this trend continues, the
Department of Wildlife Conservation will be hard pressed to deal with the ensuing
problems. The adequacy of staff at HPNP will be evaluated from time to time and suitable
action taken when necessary. No estimate of the carrying capacity with regard to visitors
has been made, but the present numbers are likely to fall within such a capacity.
Man-made fires are a common occurrence. Such fires, once started, spread over a good part
of the grassland before they could be controlled. Strict control measures would be adopted
to address this problem.
Visitor interest in Knuckles is a relatively recent phenomenon. The Forest Department in
fact favours a growth in the number of visitors with a view to propagating information on
the conservation value of this unique ecosystem. To cater to the visitors, infrastructural and
Ulex europaeus.
·
·
·
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə