Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə14/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   24

KCF
(iii) Natural disasters and risk preparedness
(iv) Visitor/tourism pressures
PWPA
HPNP
KCF
·
101
4. State of Conservation and factors affecting the property

interpretation facilities have been developed to a considerable extent. Forest trails have
been opened and guides are provided for visitors. Visitor influx is yet well below what
would be the KCF's carrying capacity.
:
Except for the Buddhist monk and his helpers at the Peak there are no permanent
inhabitants within the cultural zone of PWPA. Regarding the rest of PWPA, which is by far
the major part, there are still a few people living within the area covered by the nature
reserve. Effective measures will be taken to regularize the position of these residents.
Encroachments into the state land as had happened in the past will be prevented.
:
This cannot be estimated since the buffer zone contains many village communities and
much of the land is privately owned. (See explanatory note in Section 1. g.)
:
There is no resident population
: .
:
The once resident population within KCF that was engaged in cardamon cultivation has
moved out of the area. At present there are a few small village communities within the
boundary of the KCF, but as these are long term residents of the area and the KCF, by
definition, excludes the non-state land within the boundary, it could be said that these few
village communities do not constitute a resident population within the KCF. There are,
however, a few encroachments on the state land within the boundary, and legal action is
being taken to eject them.
:
According to the 1994 management plan the total population of the buffer zone village
communities was 40,253. No estimates were made since then. However, some data
gathered by the field staff of the FD indicate that there have been fluctuations in the
populations of the communities, some declining and others increasing. Overall, there
seems to be little change in the total population of the buffer zone communities.
(v) Number of inhabitants within the property and the buffer zone
PWPA
Estimated population located within the area of nominated property
Estimated population located within the area of the buffer zone
HPNP
Estimated population located within the area of nominated property
Estimated population located within the area of the buffer zone
KCF
Estimated population located within the area of nominated property
Estimated population located within the area of the buffer zone
·
·
No buffer zone has been identified (See explanatory note in Section 1.g)
·
102
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

5. Protection and Management of the property
5. a Ownership
5. b Protective legislation
?
?
?
?
?
PWPA
HPNP
KCF
PWPA
HPNP
Previously, in the PWS, some sections were privately owned, but with the exclusion of
these areas from the newly declared Peak Wilderness Nature Reserve (PWNR), the whole
of the PWPA has become state-owned. The conservation forests within the PWPA are
under the charge of the Forest Department. The PWNR and the pilgrim trails and peak, also
forming parts of the PWPA, are under the charge of the DWLC
The whole of HPNP is state-owned. It is under the charge of the Department of Wildlife
Conservation.
According to the government gazette notification declaring the Knuckles forest as a
conservation forest under the provisions of the Forest Ordinance, only the state land within
the defined boundary has been so declared. The existence of several small private land lots
within the marked boundary has been recognized, and according to the gazette notification
these remain private property. They are mostly under natural forest or scrub and there are
no residents within them. The anomalous situation of having such private land lots within
the boundary of the Conservation Forest has been recognized and the locations of these lots
have been identified. Action is being taken to acquire them, after which they would
automatically form part of the KCF. Apart from these land lots, there are a few ancient
villages within the boundary of KCF. The KCF is under the charge of the Forest
Department.
The PWPA comprises several parts falling under three categories of areas under protective
legislation. They are (i) The Peak Wilderness Nature Reserve (in nine blocks) which is a
highly protected area under the provisions of the Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance
and administered by the DWLC; (ii) the pilgrim trails and peak which remain in the status
of sanctuary under the provisions of the Fauna and Flora Ordinance and administered by
the Department of Wildlife Conservation; and (iii) three conservation forests so declared
under the provisions of the Forest Ordinance and administered by the Forest Department.
Horton Plains National Park was declared a National Park under the provisions of the
Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance in 1988. It is under the charge of the Department of
Wildlife Conservation.

·
KCF
KCF was declared a Conservation Forest under the provisions of the Forest Ordinance in
2000. It is under the charge of the Forest Department.
The main implementing agencies, the Forest Department and the Department of Wildlife
Conservation, are functioning under the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources.
The Ministry of Cultural Affairs and the Department of Archaeology have no
administrative control over the property but would be associated with the DWLC and FD
in aspects of management in relation to the cultural sites within the property. The
Divisional Secretaries (of the provincial administration) in the areas adjacent to the
cultural zones of PWPA would also play a supportive role in the management of pilgrims
during the peak season.
The head of the FD is the Conservator-General of Forests. The chain of command goes
down to the highest regional-level, professional forester within a forest division which is
the Divisional Forest Officer (DFO). He is in charge of carrying out the administrative and
management affairs of the section of the property under his charge. The KCF falls under
two DFOs, the DFO Kandy and the DFO Matale. Their areas of control are well defined.
The staff at the sites consists of Range Officers, Extension Officers, Beat Officers and
Field Assistants. Field Guides, who do not form part of the department's cadre, are selected
from within the local community.
The three FD forest areas within the PWPA are under the charge of two Divisional Forest
Officers. The Peak Wilderness Conservation Forest is under the control of the DFO
Nuwara Eliya and the Walawe Basin and Morahela conservation forests are under the
charge of the DFO Ratnapura. The latter two forests fall within the Balangoda Range of the
Ratnapura Division and the RFO Balangoda is the local officer responsible for their
management. The local officer responsible for the management of the Peak Wilderness
Conservation Forest is the RFO Hatton who serves under the DFO Nuwara Eliya.
The management of the DWLC areas within PWPA and the HPNP is the responsibility of
the head of DWLC i.e. the Director General of the Department of Wildlife Conservation.
The on-site staff is headed by a Grade 1 Ranger at PWPA and under him are other rangers,
range assistants and guards. At HPNP the officer in charge is the Park Warden and under
him several other officers serve as in the case of PWPA.
The three constituents of the nominated serial property are entirely located in the areas
within the control of the DWLC and FD under the respective legal enactments, the Fauna
and Flora Protection Ordinance and the Forest Ordinance. They are managed by these
departments, and, while receiving the cooperation of the provincial administration, there
are no separate plans that link the provincial administration with the administration and
management of the constituents of the property. The local officers of the FD and the
DWLC attend the multi-sectoral District Coordinating Committee meetings that are held
regularly in their respective districts and any issues relating to the management of the areas
5. c Means of implementing protective measures
5. d Existing plans related to municipality and region in which the proposed
property is located
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
104

included in the property are discussed, and decisions taken. An example of coordinated and
supportive action is the decision taken at the district level in Matale to provide a grant for
additions and improvements to the visitor centre at Illukkumbura in the KCF.
The management of the serial property is covered by the following management plans
which are submitted with the nomination:
1. Peak Wilderness Sanctuary 1999 - 2003
2. Management Plan
Protected Area Complex 2005 (Adam's
Peak Range)
3. Management Plan Horton Plains National Park 1999 - 2003
4. Management Plan Horton Plains National Park 2005
5. Management Plan for the Conservation of the Knuckles Forest 1994
In view of the fact that the three areas (PWPA, HPNP and KCF) are now being nominated
as a serial property with
for inscription in the World
Heritage List, an explanatory note is appended to the nomination dossier to indicate how
the system of management of the three sites will be revamped and strengthened in order to
embody both cultural and natural features. (See Appendix 3).
The conservation and management of the property is financed from the Consolidated Fund
of the government through the annual national budget. The financial allocations for the
areas falling under the two departments cover the salaries of the staff, travelling expenses
and administrative costs. The approximate annual allocations are as follows.
KCF (under the DFOs Kandy and Matale): SL Rs 3.7 million
PWPA (under DFOs Ratnapura and Nuwara Eliya): SL Rs 3 million
PWPA (under DWLC); SL Rs 3.8 million
HPNP (under DWLC): SL Rs 7.1 million
Other than work carried out through regular funding by government, several activities
including the construction of buildings at PWPA, HPNP and KCF have been carried out
through donor funded projects. For example, in the year 2006, SL Rs 17 million was used at
HPNP, mainly for construction work, from an ADB supported project.
The provincial administration had also provided funds for the construction of some
buildings in KCF. The main foreign funding agencies involved were the Global
Environmental Facility and the Asian Development Bank. One of these projects
(PAM&WLC) is still operational at the time of writing.
The management of the property is carried out by local staff. The FD professional staff
members are recruited from among graduates in a relevant scientific discipline. After
5. e Property management plan or other management system
5. f Sources and levels of finance
5. g
Sources of expertise and training in conservation and management
techniques
Samanala Adaviya
both cultural and natural values
·
·
·
·
5. Protection and Management of the property
105

recruitment they receive their forestry training (generally of two years duration) at various
foreign institutions, mainly the Forest Institute in Dehra Dun, India. The sub-professional
level staff members (rangers) are trained (two years) at the Forest Institute in Nuwara Eliya.
Beat officers are given a year's training at the same institute.
There is no regular scheme for training DWLC staff overseas. Some ranger level officers,
however, have had the opportunity of following courses abroad, some for six months and
some others for two weeks, on a donor assistance project. The recently established training
institute in Sri Lanka, located in Giritale, provides training facilities for selected members
of the staff. Wildlife management courses are also being conducted at the local universities
and members of the staff of DWLC are provided the opportunity to follow these courses.
The visitors, mainly pilgrims ascending the mountain, number nearly two million during
the six-month pilgrim season. The state provides basic facilities such as resting places for
pilgrims enroute to the Peak, electric lighting of the trails, controlling pollution, etc. Other
needs (like food and drink) are catered for by private parties that set up stalls during the
pilgrim season.
Most visitors visit HPNP only for the day. Overnight accommodation is available for ten
visitors at Anderson lodge. There are staff quarters (for ten) for visiting officers. A
dormitory that would provide accommodation for 40 visitors is being rehabilitated. What is
missing are research facilities for researchers i.e. quarters and a modest research station.
The DWLC will address this issue
The number of visitors annually between 2001 and 2005 has been between 150,000 and
200,000. In 2006 it went up to 204,510. The trend has been a constant increase in numbers.
The great majority are day visitors, and visits are mainly during the week-ends and on other
holidays.
The KCF can be approached from two directions - from Matale, leading up to the
Illukkumbura entrance and from Kandy to the Deanstone entrance on the opposite side of
the conservation area. The visitor facilities at both places are nothing short of excellent. A
full-fledged conservation centre has been constructed at each of the sites. This includes
dormitories, dining facilities and a lecture room. In addition to the dormitories,
Illukkumbura has two eco-lodges for eight persons in each lodge. The running of the eco-
lodge facility has been handed over to a community based organization. The lecture facility
at Deanstone is an open air one. There is some scope for expanding the presentation and
interpretation activities. The dedication of the officers running the two sections of KCF is
commendable.
The visitor statistics (total number of visitors, including school children in 2005 and 2006)
5. h Visitor facilities and statistics
·
·
·
PWPA
HPNP
KCF
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
106

are as follows:
Illukkumbura entrance -
2005 number of visitors: 2082
2006 number of visitors:1967
Deanstone entrance -
2005 number of visitors: 999
2006 number of visitors: 2283
Forestry and wildlife policies that have evolved over the years have continued to place
increasing emphasis on the conservation value of the island's natural ecosystems. At the
same time, the strict principle of command and control gave way to recognition of the local
people as stakeholders. Community based organizations for promoting forest conservation
were established in the buffer zones of several forests. This trend led to the inclusion of
three areas in the world network of biosphere reserves and many other forests being made
national biosphere reserves. The management plans for these forests are prepared in
consultation with the local people. One of the biosphere reserves in the international
network, the Sinharaja forest reserve, has been inscribed in the World Heritage List.
Policies and programmes will constantly be adapted in order to further sensitize the local
people to the value of the property as a natural heritage of considerable importance and
obtain their support for conservation. Workshops and seminars are conducted for the
school children in the locality. The recognition of the property as a World Heritage will
enhance the impact of these programmes when carried out in the buffer zone villages. With
Sri Lanka's exceptionally high literacy rate, programmes of this nature do capture the
interest of the school going population even in the villages.
Skills training programmes for the staff are not systematically conducted at the property. In
programmes being conducted for staff training at the Forestry and Wildlife training
institutes, however, the property is included in field visits which form a part of the training
course. Only trained officers are placed in charge of the three constituents of the property.
5. i
Policies and programmes related to the presentation and promotion of the
property
5.j Staffing levels (professional, technical, maintenance)
5. Protection and Management of the property
107

6. Monitoring
6. a Key indicators for measuring state of conservation
Of special note is the fact that the property that is being nominated is a serial one with three
constituent parts, and nomination is for inscription as a Mixed Heritage, i.e. with both
cultural and natural features of outstanding universal value. The state of conservation of
the property could be considered satisfactory. However, several areas have been identified
where action is needed in order to enhance the value of the property in terms of both its
cultural and natural features. Action will be taken on these lines. The property, being what
it is, such action has to be taken by several institutions in both the cultural and natural
resource sectors. The indicators set out in the tables that follow recognize the need for such
ation. Earlier species surveys and the recent biodiversity baseline survey provisionally
identified some indicator species (set out in Section 4). More definite information,
however, will have to await further studies in the three areas.
Monitoring in respect of most of the indicators will not be treated just as a specific exercise
to be carried out at stated intervals. It will consist of a regular and systematic collection,
collation and analysis of data. This may be done annually to study and take note of ongoing
changes. It may be based on recorded information by field staff and on findings of research
workers. In some cases, however, it will be necessary to carry out specially designed
surveys. This will be needed in particular where observations may suggest adverse trends.
The suggested periodicity as given in the table below should be understood in this context.
6. a. 1 PWPA
Indicator
Periodicity
Location of records
1. Number of permanent trade stalls put
up on the routes to the Peak (needed in
order to avoid the cutting of timber from
the forest every year to construct
temporary stalls)
Three-yearly
DWLC
2. Number of additional toilet facilities
provided for pilgrims and visitors who
trek to the Peak
Five-yearly
DWLC
3. Degree of pollution from litter and
other garbage
Yearly
DWLC

4. Number of previously degraded sites
alongside the pilgrim routes showing clear
signs of ecological restoration
Five-yearly
DWLC
5. Number of offences detected and legal
action taken regarding collection of plants
and animals by visitors
Yearly
DWLC
6. Number of notices put up, instruction
leaflets provided, and other means of
communication used to indicate prohibited
practices and promote conservation
Yearly
DWLC, FD
7. Number of trained guides
Two-yearly
DWLC, FD
8. Number of trees of Kokoona zeylanica
where removal of bark is observed (note:
bark is stripped off for use in ayurvedic
medicine)
Yearly
DWLC, FD
9. Number of temporary shelters put up by
those engaged in illicit gem mining in
rivers and streams
Yearly
DWLC, FD
10. Number of encroachments and other
offences in PWPA observed and number
of offences where legal action is being
taken
Yearly
DWLC, FD
11. Number of conservation oriented
CBOs established in the buffer zone
Two-yearly
DWLC, FD
12. Number and km of nature trails opened
and maintained in good condition (Note:
no nature trail would be linked to the
pilgrim routes)
Five-yearly
DWLC, FD
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
110

111
6. Monitoring
13. Condition of the facilities available to
researchers and to the public
Yearly
DWLC, FD
14. Revising/Preparing and implementing
management plans, taking into account the
conservation of both the cultural and
natural features and the upgraded status of
the component parts of the PWPA
Three-yearly
DWLC, FD
15. Changes in populations of indicator
species of fauna
Five-ten year
intervals
DWLC
6. a. 2 HPNP
Indicator
Periodicity
Location of records
1. Progress made in giving special
protection to identified cultural sites
and adequately presenting them to the
public
Two-yearly
DWLC, Post-
graduate Institute of
Archaeology
2. Improvement of interpretation
facilities provided, focusing on both
the cultural and natural features of
HPNP
Two-yearly
DWLC
3. Trends in the spread of the invasive
species Ulex europaeus
Two-yearly
DWLC
4. Occurrence (number) and degree of
spread of fires each year
Yearly
DWLC
5. Degree of environmental pollution
from garbage disposal
Yearly
DWLC

112
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
6. Trends in the extent affected by tree
dieback
Five-yearly
DWLC
7. Number of detections and action
taken against illegal collection of
plants, poaching, and causing damage
to information boards
Yearly
DWLC
8. Number of detections made and
legal action taken against illegal gem
mining
Yearly
DWLC
9. Trends in the population of
Panthera pardus kotiya (given its
small population), provisionally
considered a keystone species in
HPNP
Five-yearly
DWLC
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə