Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   24

1. Identification of the Property
1. a Country
1. b Pro
ce
1 c Name of Property
1. d Geographical coordinates
1. e Maps and Plans
Sri Lanka
The three components of the serial property fall within the Central and Sabaragamuwa
Provinces
The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: its natural and cultural heritage
The nominated property is a serial one, consisting of three areas. The geographical
coordinates of the three areas are given below.
The following maps and plans are included in this nomination at the end
of the text.
Bioclimatic zones of Sri Lanka
Central highlands
Floristic regions
Locations of the serial sites
PWPA and HPNP
PWPA and HPNP vegetation
vin
.
?
?
?
?
?
?
Area
Province(s)
Nearest
town(s)
Administrative
district(s)
Coordinates of
mid-points
1. Peak
Wilderness
Protected Area
(PWPA)
Central and
Sabaragamuwa
Maskeliya
Ratnapura,
Nuwara Eliya,
Kegalle
6
0
48’ 04 96” N
80
0
37’ 31 13”E
2. Horton
Plains National
Park
(HPNP)
Central
Nuwara Eliya
Nuwara Eliya
6
0
48’ 22 07” N
80
0
47’ 47 55”E
3. Knuckles
Conservation
Forest
(KCF)
Central
Matale,
Kandy
Kandy, Matale
7
0
27’ 08 82” N
80
0
48’ 07 56”E

?
?
?
?
PWPA and buffer zone and adjoining reserve forests
PWPA drainage pattern (hydrology)
KCF and buffer zone
KCF vegetation map
Topographical maps showing PWPA, HPNP and KCF are included
among the documents
Peak Wilderness Protected Area (PWPA):
20,596 ha
Peak Wilderness Protected Area area of buffer zone: buffer zone identified
conceptually; not legally defined or land marked: 37,571 ha
Horton Plains National Park (HPNP): 3109 ha
Horton Plains area of buffer zone: no buffer zone required
Knuckles Conservation Forest (KCF): 31,305 ha
Knuckles Conservation Forest area of buffer zone zone: buffer zone identified
conceptually; not legally defined or land marked: 35,074 ha
The buffer zone concept has been recognized by the Forest Department for several
decades and it was put into effect when management plans were drawn up for conservation
forests which were made national or international biosphere reserves.
The buffer zone concept and its application have to be viewed in the context of the
prevailing situation in the wet zone of Sri Lanka. The wet zone rainforests were subject to
extensive deforestation in the past and what remains now are numerous forest patches, the
large majority of which are relatively small (by world standards) and are ringed by village
communities or are situated cheek by jowl with tea plantations. The buffer zones that have
been identified by the Forest Department in relation to the biosphere reserves that have
been established in Sri Lanka are located outside the protected area and are not legally
defined as such. The buffer zones include, for the most part, villages, tea plantations and
other private land. While the inner boundary of the buffer zone coincides with the outer
boundary of the reserve, the outer boundary of the buffer zone (which is determined only
conceptually) is marked out depending on the specific needs in relation to the protection of
the reserve.
1. f Areas of the three constituent parts of the nominated property
1. g Explanatory statement on the buffer zone
1
In the Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance (which is administered by the Department of
Wildlife Conservation) an amendment made in 1993 makes provision for the establishment of a
new category of wildlife reserve called a Buffer Zone. Such a reserve, like the other categories
of wildlife reserves, should consist only of state land. Up to now (2006-2007), no areas have
been declared as Buffer Zones under the Fauna and Flora Protection Ordinance (FFPO). The
buffer zones of the Forest Department's conservation forests and the buffer zones of the
constituent areas of the nominated property are not legally constituted as such and bear no
relevance to the Buffer Zone category recognized by the FFPO
2
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

The added measure of protection that the buffer zone provides comes through a wide range
of activities designed to strengthen the conservation of the protected area through public
participation. The measures that are adopted include the formation of community based
conservation organizations; education, awareness and communication programmes;
introducing improved agricultural practices in private land holdings; raising village
woodlots; training the youth in various skills so as to wean the community away from
excessive dependence on the forest; and not least by carrying out health camps for the
more remote village communities to win their support for the conservation of the natural
ecosystem.
This same buffer zone concept will be adopted in the areas included in the property being
nominated. The buffer zone so conceived will include all the border village communities.
Information specific to the three constituent areas is given below. Where no specific buffer
zone is needed (e.g. in sections where the Forest Department's reserve forests, which are
themselves given strong legal protection, fall immediately outside the boundary of
sections of the property) no buffer zone as such is identified.
Some parts of PWPA are contiguous with forest reserves under the charge of the Forest
Department (e.g. the Bogawantalawa and Agrabopats forests) and their very existence and
the strict protective measures adopted by the Forest Department would serve as an
adequate protection for those sections of the PWPA. Hence no buffer zone is marked in
those areas.
In several parts of PWPA there are peripheral villages. Wickramasinghe (2002) who has
carried out a socio-economic study of the area notes that the “periphery of the Adam's Peak
Wilderness is marked by a long history of human settlements” and that there are 11 clusters
of communities, eight in the west and south and three in the north. Each cluster consists of
several small village communities. The history of the southern villages goes back several
centuries, whereas the settlements to the north came into being with the establishment of
tea plantations during the British colonial period. The traditional village practices in
relation to the use of forest resources are strongly associated with the belief in the
sacredness of the
(Peak Wilderness range).
Community-based programmes will be started in the sections of the buffer zone occupied
by village communities with a view to strengthening conservation measures and
restricting dependence on forest resources to sustainable levels. There will be a strong
emphasis on cultural and religious aspects in the PWPA buffer zone programmes. The
programmes will be implemented by the Forest Department and the Department of
Wildlife Conservation (in collaboration with the cultural sector institutions) in the
respective buffer zone areas adjoining the sections of the PWPA under their control.
The need for a buffer zone for HPNP does not arise. The management plan (DWLC 1999b)
states “Fortunately this park does not have the problems typical of most parks in Sri Lanka
as there are no human habitations in its periphery”. It is for the most part surrounded by
natural forest, protected and administered by the Forest Department. Where tea plantations
PWPA
HPNP
Samanala Adaviya
occur, they are situated at the bottom of a steep escarpment, the Southern Wall,
which gives natural protection to the property.
3
1. Identification of the Property

KCF
The area surrounding the KCF has been considered as the buffer zone, and the management
plan has made several proposals for activities to be carried out within the area. According
to the plan, “buffer zone management in general aims to establish an ecologically and
socio-economically sustainable interactive relationship between the forest and the people
living in the surrounding areas” Several activities were initiated over the past decade and
are continuing.
In some parts, the buffer zone includes forest ecosystems no different to the adjacent part of
the KCF. These forests are being surveyed under a current Forest Resources Management
Project. The Forest Department would consider declaring such areas as conservation
forests so as to provide added protection to the KCF.
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
4

2. Description
2. a Description of the Property
2. a. 1 Location
Sri Lanka's highlands, where the land rises to an elevation of over 2500 m above mean sea
level (msl), are situated in the south-central part of the island. Sri Lanka's land area is
65,610 km , and, of this, the highlands (>1000 m above msl) constitute only 3%. The
property, comprising
, is situated in the central highlands.
The main part of the high mountainous region is referred to as the Central Massif. It has the
rough shape of an anchor. Both PWPA and HPNP are located in the arc shaped part of the
anchor. Knuckles, though separated from the Central Massif and forming a distinct
mountainous region referred to as the Knuckles Massif, has a common geological origin
with the Central Massif. The Knuckles is separated from the Central Massif by the
relatively low-lying Kandy Plateau and the Dumbara valley. The two mountainous regions
have been so isolated for many thousands of years. The Kandy Plateau provides the
passage through which the Mahaweli Ganga, Sri Lanka's longest river, crosses the
mountainous country and passes from the south western part of the country where it
originates to the eastern part through which it flows over a long distance and finally
discharges into the ocean at Trincomalee.
The topography of the island as a whole has for long been described as forming three
peneplains. Inland from the coast, the lowest peneplain, which is the most extensive as it
also occupies the entire northern and eastern parts of the island, has an altitude of 0-125 m
above msl. The second peneplain is at 448-762 m, and the third, the highest, at 1524-2200
m. Each peneplain is separated from the next at several points by steep escarpments. The
highest peneplain and the associated mountain ranges are where much of the constituent
parts of the nominated property are located. The area covered by this peneplain has very
little resemblance to a plain and there can, in fact, be recognized several planation surfaces
as well as mountains within this area. The planation surfaces occur at different levels, and
steep mountainous areas rise well above the planation surfaces.
The three-peneplain model is now considered to be an oversimplified version of the
physiography of the island. Wickramagamage (1998) has shown that there are as many as
11 planation levels and that a “staircase pattern” of planation surfaces could be recognized.
He states that the staircase arrangement of the erosional surfaces in the hill country may be
the result of both differential weathering and erosion and also due to tectonic uplift.
Turning our attention to the three constituents of the nominated property, PWPA is for the
most part located in the mountainous area that rises above all the planation surfaces, HPNP
is the highest step in the staircase pattern of planation surfaces, and KCF is a mountainous
area that is separated from the Central Massif where the other two constituents are located.
KCF has within it a planation surface, the Selvakanda plateau.
The Kandy plateau that separates the Central Massif from the Knuckles Massif is at around
500 m above msl and is situated in the second peneplain on the three-peneplain model.
2
three component parts

2. a. 2 Culturally significant features
Peak Wilderness Protected Area (PWPA)
The property, with its three constituent areas, presents a wide range of cultural heritage
features of outstanding value. In Sri Lanka's remarkable hydraulic civilization that
spanned several centuries, the people and the monarchs alike while developing an
agriculture-based civilization also placed a high value on cultural and religious practices.
In this context, Adam's Peak, in a rugged mountainous area, though far removed from the
centres of development in the dry zone, began to attract devotees, including several of the
monarchs, who braved the hazards of the thick forest and the precipitous terrain to climb
the mountain and pay homage at the shrine that was established there. This practice has
continued and grown in magnitude through the passage of centuries. Many foreign
travelers also made it a point to climb the peak and have commented on the spectacular
features of this site.
Horton Plains, contiguous with the Peak Wilderness Protected Area, presents a different
aspect of cultural significance. Recent palaeo-ecological studies in Horton Plains have
revealed that prehistoric man occupied this area first as hunter-forager c. 24,000 years
before present (BP) and later through several stages of cultural development that followed.
The Knuckles range, where archaeological investigations have been carried out only in
recent times, has turned up several caves with evidence of their occupation by Mesolithic
man. Subsequently, from around 300 BC, some of the caves had become the abode of
Buddhist monks.
Another cultural feature of special significance is the existence within the range of ancient
villages which, until recent times, had no road access. The inaccessibility of this
mountainous area had sheltered the villages from the influence of modernization. Until
about two decades ago the village dwellings were of mud and in the style of several
centuries back. Some of the dwellings that are still in that form would be selected for
conservation and will be preserved as monuments. Many of the ancient cultural practices
remain in vogue even today.
The cultural features of the three areas are described in further detail below.
The Adam's Peak Range, with its prominent cone-shaped peak provides a spectacular view
from a distance. The peak itself is steeped in legend antedating the Christian era. The
historical document the
(Anon. 543 BC-1758 AD) indicates that the peak
was held sacred prior to 140 BC.
At its very top, the peak bears an indentation resembling a footprint. Deemed to be the
footprint of the Lord Buddha, the site acquired a religious significance from very early
times. Since then, in an unbroken chain, the religious and cultural importance of the site
has grown in magnitude.
At the present time it is estimated that two million people, mainly pilgrims, visit the peak
annually. The trek to the top involves a long and arduous climb through trails passing
through the thick forests of the Peak Wilderness. The pilgrim season is from December to
May. Much of the climbing is done at night, and electric lights are now in place to light up
Mahawamsa
6
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

the paths. The climbing is done in a spirit of deep piety. There are six recognized trails
traversing the mountainous terrain and leading to the peak, with three of them being the
more popular. The time spent by an average person for the ascent from the vehicle park,
excluding rest times, is from 8 to 16 hours, depending on the trail that is used. Resting
places had been built alongside the climbing routes for the convenience of pilgrims.
At present Horton Plains is an uninhabited tableland with a cold and forbidding climate
and subject to strong winds at certain times of the year. It was until recent times difficult to
reach. The natural vegetation over a good part of the area comprises grasses and other
herbaceous plants.
In an archaeological survey of Horton Plains, Deraniyagala (1992) located many
prehistoric sites, among which one yielded geometric microliths. One of the sites was
identified as a likely quartz quarry (Deraniyagala 1971). Deraniyagala (1992) drew the
following conclusions from his studies. The ancient habitation sites at Horton Plains were
mainly located on hill saddles, with a few occurring on hill tops and on promontories
jutting out of the main plateau. There were indications that the ecotone between the forest
and the grassland was preferred, suggesting that the grasslands were already in existence
when prehistoric man occupied these sites. The extent of each site of occupation was
estimated to be on average 50 m , suggesting that it was probably occupied by just one
“nuclear” family. The stone-age sites at Horton Plains probably represented seasonal
camps when man moved up to the hills during the dry season to fire the grasslands and thus
drive the game.
Recent palaeo-ecological research has turned up a significant body of information
confirming the occupation of Horton Plains by prehistoric man and providing information
on his livelihood activities and how these were adapted to changing climatic conditions
through a span of several millennia, from 24,000 years BP. This new evidence is based on
radio carbon dated palaeo-ecological discoveries of peat and sediment sequences found in
cores extracted to a depth of six metres (Premathilake 2003, 2006; Premathilake &
Risberg 2003).
Horton Plains National Park (HPNP)
2
A distant view of the Peak Wilderness Range
© Studio Times
© Studio Times
7
2. Description of the Property

The palaeo-ecological evidence reveals that cultural development began with hunting and
foraging (hunter-gatherer stage) under the dry conditions that prevailed during the last
glacial maximum (24,000-18,500 years BP). Subsequently, in the post-glacial period, with
increasingly favourable climatic conditions, there is evidence of slash and burn and
herding and incipient management of cereal plants of oat and barley (17,600 16,000 years
BP). The first signs of systematic cultivation appear between 13,000 and 8700 years BP
when wild species of
were grown. More details of the prehistory of Horton Plains are
given under 2.b.1.
The cultural features of KCF relevant to its inclusion as a constituent of the property being
nominated as a Mixed Heritage relates mainly to the evidence of cave dwelling humans
dating back to the Mesolithic period. The investigations, however, are at a very early stage
and only some basic information could be provided at present. De Silva et al. (2005b)
describe the Mesolithic Gorahadigala caves discovered in the Dotulagala section of KCF.
The entrance to the main cave is situated about 2.5 m above the present ground level. On the
floor of the main cave there was a thick ash mixture, one metre deep. Bones of several
species of animals were among the findings here, together with stone implements. Most of
the quartz implements identified as microliths were seen to bear faint traces of retouch
marks. Similar findings in other parts of the country, notably in Kitulgala in the Ratnapura
district, have been dated from 27,000 to 9000 years BP (Deraniyagala 1992, Wijayapala
1997).
Among the other recent discoveries are the Uyangamuwa cave, the Valagamba cave and
the Nariyagala cave. These caves bear a characteristic architectural feature called a drip
ledge which is a groove chiseled along the brow of the overhanging boulder at the entrance
to the cave to divert the down-flowing rainwater away from the entrance. (De Silva et al.
2005c). According to legend, King Valagamba had ordered drip ledges to be chiseled to
make the caves more habitable for the Buddhist monks who resided there. The use of these
-
Oryza
Knuckles Conservation Forest (KCF)
One of the sites at HPNP where first agriculture was practised in South Asia
© Dr T R Premathilake
8
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

caves by Buddhist monks date back to around the second century BC.
Surface investigations in the Uyangamuwa cave yielded two silver punch-marked coins.
These belong to the pre Christian early historic period (fifth to first century BC) and are of
Indian origin.
The best known cave in KCF is the Nitre Cave, explored by Davy in 1821. Its history is
steeped in legend which, however, is not supported by any substantial scientific evidence
(Cooray 1998). It is believed that deposits in the cave were used to extract saltpetre during
the time of the Kandyan kingdom.
A distinctive feature of the Knuckles range as a whole, from the point of view of culture,
stems from its extreme remoteness and inaccessibility. The people living in some of the
villages (e.g. Damentenna, Ettanwela, Walpolamulla, Gangahenwala, Rambukoluwa,
Kiwulwadiya, Galgedawala) would have had to traverse thick forests across narrow foot
paths at perilous heights and cross natural watercourses to reach their habitations.
There are some villages in the thick of the mountain range which until recent times modern
civilization has hardly touched. One such village, Meemure, is believed to have been a
place of exile in ancient times to which, because of its remoteness and isolation, persons
who had offended against the king were banished. The remoteness served another purpose.
The last king who ruled in Sri Lanka before the country acceded to the British (in 1816) was
Sri Wickrama Rajasinghe. He is said to have taken refuge with his family in Meemure at
the time that he was being pursued by the British troops.
More details regarding the cultural developments among the people occupying the
9
© Anslem de Silva
© Anslem de Silva
© Anslem de Silva
© Anslem de Silva
Caves occupied by prehistoric Mesolithic man at KCF, and primary tool types (microliths)
found in these Mesolithic caves.
2. Description of the Property

Knuckles range since pre-
Christian times are given in section
2.b.1.
T h e
i m p a c t
o f
m o d e r n
developments reaching these
villages over the past years and the
children receiving education
denied to their parents is leading to
t h e d i s a p p e a r a n c e o f t h e
manifestations of this ancient
culture. What is proposed is to
identify a village and select one or
more properties for conservation in order to depict and to preserve evidence of this culture.
The three constituent areas of the nominated property are located in the high mountainous
part of the country. Although, in a general way, they share in the common features of their
mountainous terrain, there are some differences in physiography between them which
should be noted. The most prominent physiographic feature of PWPA is the prominent
cone-shaped mountain top that reaches a sharp peak at an elevation of 2243 m. The mean
altitude is given by DWLC (1999a) as 1830 m above msl and the maximum as 2243 m.
Reference to the topographical maps show that some of the fringe areas of PWPA go down
to an elevation of 600 m. The terrain is very rugged with steep escarpments covering about
50% of the area. In the upper slopes the bedrock is often exposed while in the lower
sections of the escarpments there is a mantle of lithosols and skeletal soils. Rock knobs -
steep - sided and often dome - shaped exposures of bedrock - cover over 5% of the area.
In HPNP, the terrain, for the most part, in contrast to the Adam's Peak Range, consists of
gently undulating land forming a highland plateau situated at the southern edge of the arc
of the anchor-shaped Central Massif. It forms the highest tableland in Sri Lanka at an
average elevation of 2200 m. Because of the stability of the landscape, soil profile
development has taken place leading to the formation of a mature soil profile.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə