Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə21/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24

Family: Lycaenidae
Land snails at the KCF
Family: Steptaxidae
Family: Acavidae
Family: Ariophantidae
Family: Buliminide
h
h
189
Appendix 2 faunal species list

Family: Corillidae
Family: Camaenidae
Family: Charopidae
Family: Cyclophoridae
Family: Euconulidae
Family: Endodontidae
Family:Glessulidae
Family: Pupinidae
Family: Subulinidae
Family: Vertiginidae
Family: Veronicellidae
Corilla colletii*
Corilla gudei*
Corilla erronea*
Corilla odontophora*
Beddomea trifaciatus*
Beddomea albizonatus*
Thysanota elegans
Ruthvenia
Theobaldius annulatus*
Theobaldius bairdi*
Theobaldius subplicatus*
Theobaldius cadiscus*
Aulopoma grande*
Cyclophorus ceylanicus*
Japonia vesca*
Leptopomoides poecilus*
Pterocyclus cumingi
Euryclamys regulata*
Philalanka
Glessula lankana*
Glessula panaetha*
Glessula sinhila *
Tortulosa layardi*
Tortulosa sykesi*
Tortulosa nevilli*
Subilina octana
Pupisoma longstaffae*
Laevicaulis alte
*
sp.
sp.
h
Allopeas layardi*
190
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Appendix 3
Explanatory note on revising the system of management for the
three areas (PWPA, HPNP and KCF) following acceptance for
inscription in the World Heritage List
1. Introduction
The serial property that is being nominated consists of three constituent parts:
1. Peak Wilderness Protected Area (PWPA)
2. Horton Plains National Park (HPNP)
3. Knuckles Conservation Forest (KCF)
Management plans for the three constituents of the property are being submitted in the
dossier. The programmes of action included in the plans largely relate to the natural
resource values of the property. Notwithstanding this, the implementing agencies have
provided support for research on, and conservation of, cultural sites within and around the
property. Hence, the current management of the property is consistent with the
requirements for inscription of the property in the World Heritage List. However, the
quality of management of the three constituents would be enhanced if certain operational
measures are adopted that will give adequate recognition of the additional dimension
relating to their cultural values. This is one important reason for revising the system of
management through the development and implementation of a set of operational plans as
proposed in this statement. The plans would be developed and implementation begun
within two years of the acceptance of the nomination to inscribe the property in the World
Heritage List.
The first concrete steps leading to the development of operational plans are complete. They
are the important legislative measures pertaining to the peak wilderness area, which have
already been taken, resulting in the integrity of the area that had remained in an uncertain
state for decades being firmly established as described in more detail below.
With regard to peak wilderness, the plans that had been developed were for the
management, as a single entity, of the entire area covered by what was until very recently
described as the Peak Wilderness Sanctuary under the Fauna and Flora Protection
Ordinance. This was done notwithstanding the fact that a good part of the sanctuary was
under the control of the Forest Department in terms of the Forest Ordinance. Now the parts
of the PWS that will remain exclusively under the control of the DWLC have been declared
as a Nature Reserve under the provisions of the FFPO. The three FD areas have been
declared as Conservation Forests under the provisions of the Forest Ordinance, and these
areas will be exclusively under this department. Unlike the category of Forest Reserve in
the earlier Forest Ordinance, the category of Conservation Forest makes the area
concerned a “protected area”. With these changes there is a need for the DWLC to revamp
its PWS management plan and equally there is a need for the FD to develop an operational
plan for its three conservation forests. Such a course of action will ensure that the
management functions of the two main implementing agencies (DWLC and FD), as they
relate to the areas under their control, are set out without overlap.

In the case of KCF, the plan was made over 12 years ago and though the broad management
strategies still remain valid, there is a need for updating the plan and setting out a plan of
operations that will take into account developments since 1994.
Another matter that has to be attended to is the inclusion of the cultural sector agencies as
stakeholders in the management of the property. This has been tacitly accepted up to now
and there has been no hindrance to cultural activities within the property, but if accepted
for inclusion in the World Heritage List as a mixed property (recognized for its cultural and
natural values), management and conservation of the cultural sites should be specifically
included in the operational plans. This would have to cover the goals, policies for
achieving the goals, and the action to be taken in respect of the three constituents of the
property. It is obvious therefore that the cultural sector institutions should participate in the
development of the operational plans.
The property is located in the central highlands of Sri Lanka, falling, for the most part,
within the montane and submontane zones, with an elevation rising to around 2500 m
above mean sea level.
The outstanding value of the property rests on:
(a) The natural heritage feature consisting of a unique assemblage of endemic, rare, and
relict biological species whose only habitats worldwide are in the wet zone located in
southwest Sri Lanka. These habitats have been severely eroded over the past centuries
leaving but a few isolated patches that are still in a near pristine condition, and these must
be safeguarded in order to ensure the survival of the biota as a world heritage of
considerable biogeographical and evolutionary significance.
(b) The cultural features based on (i) links with Sri Lanka's ancient civilization, dating
back to 300 BC, where human development was pursued by the ruling monarchs through
attention to the material needs of the people (Sri Lanka's remarkable hydraulic
civilization)
with attention being paid to promoting spiritual and cultural values
(religious monuments, including the world renowned Adam's Peak in the Peak mountain
range); (ii) evidence of sequential agricultural development and adjustment to changing
climatic conditions by Mesolithic man (antedating such developments elsewhere in South
Asia by several millennia) (HPNP); and (iii) evidence of the occupation of Mesolithic
man, and subsequently by Buddhist monks (around 200 BC), of caves in the thick of the
montane forest, and the persistence of ancient cultural practices in remote villages (KCF).
This area has had a chequered history in as far as its protection is concerned. Prior to the
1950s, the Forest Department was in charge of all the major forest areas in the island, and
the Forest Ordinance as well as the Fauna and Flora Ordinance were administered by this
Department. As far back as 1893, certain areas in the Peak range were declared Forest
Reserves. The forest areas of relevance in the current context are what were until very
recently called the Morahela Forest Reserve, the Walawe Basin Forest Reserve and the
Peak Wilderness Proposed Forest Reserve. Under the Forest Ordinance
any forest area could be selected for timber extraction and in that
2. Brief History and the Composition of the Property
PWPA
pari passu
which was
operational at the time
·
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
192

sense no area falling within the administration of the Forest Department could have been
considered as strictly protected.
With the enactment of the Fauna and Flora Ordinance (FFPO) in 1937, which in the early
years was administered by the Forest Department, as the Department of Wildlife had not
yet been established, the opportunity was taken to fulfill the long felt need to declare
Adam's Peak (because of its overwhelming cultural and religious significance) and the
surrounding wilderness as a protected area. Of the categories of protected areas recognized
in the FFPO, the only category that would meet the situation was the category Sanctuary.
This is because of the existence of private lands within the wilderness area, and a sanctuary
is the only category of protected area that does not require that the entire area should
belong to the state. Contrary to what the name may imply, a sanctuary as defined in the
FFPO is the category with the lowest degree of protection. The Adam's Peak wilderness
area, including the two forest reserves and the proposed forest reserve, was declared a
sanctuary under the FFPO in 1940. Subsequently, with the establishment of the
Department of Wildlife Conservation, the PWS came under its authority. However, though
included as a part of the sanctuary, the three forest reserves continued to be managed by the
FD. This anomalous situation was only recently rectified through appropriate legislative
measures as described in this paper.
Over the years, while the three areas administered by the Forest Department continued to
receive the attention of that department which has a long history of sound forest
management, the rest of the sanctuary had a mixed history. Encroachments continued, and
the district administration took its own decisions regarding the regularization of
encroachments, and in effect took control over much of the state land in the PWS.
The anomalous situation where certain areas falling within the sanctuary were covered by
two separate ordinances and supposedly administered by two separate departments was
highlighted in two management plans that were prepared in the 1990s (IUCN 1996,
DWLC 1999a). The two plans urged that changes be made to the legal status of the
sanctuary and to its administration, and the DWLC plan is in fact titled:
. This is based on the
recommendation made in the plan to upgrade the status of the area from Sanctuary to
National Park.
When the proposal to declare the Peak Wilderness area as a part of a serial property to be
proposed as a World Heritage was taken up, the legal and administrative matters concerned
were examined by the Ministry of Environment and the two departments concerned. It was
decided to take action as follows:
1. The PWS to cease to be a sanctuary, except for the peak and the paths leading up to the
peak, which would remain in the status of a sanctuary.
2. To demarcate the areas of
within the Sanctuary, except for the three areas
under the control of the Forest Department and the areas that will remain in the category of
sanctuary and to declare the area so demarcated as a Nature Reserve under the Fauna and
Flora Protection Ordinance. (As the area was to form a part of the property that is being
nominated as
, the category of Nature Reserve was
considered more appropriate than that of National Park).
Management
Plan: Peak Wilderness Sanctuary - Proposed National Park
state land
both a cultural and natural heritage
Appendix 3 (Management System)
193

3. The three areas under the Forest Department to be more decidedly placed under the
control of this department and to be upgraded to the protected area status of Conservation
Forest under the present Forest Ordinance.
Action has now been taken on these lines. Whereas the DWLC could exercise little or no
authority over the sanctuary in the past, the declaration of its area as a nature reserve will
give it considerably greater authority.
The outstanding cultural cum religious site in PWPA is the sacred peak and the connected
infrastructural features. Particularly during the pilgrim season, the district administration
in collaboration with DWLC, takes the responsibility for making the many organizational
arrangements that are needed to cater to the hundreds of thousands of people that visit the
shrine monthly.
Horton Plains had been an area that fell into the loose category of “other state forests” and
was earlier under the control of the Forest Department. In 1969, the area was vested in the
DWLC and declared a Nature Reserve under the FFPO, and, subsequently, in 1988, as a
National Park under the same ordinance. Since then it has been managed by the
Department of Wildlife Conservation. There are no administrative or legal complications
regarding the management of the HPNP. The area was covered by the management plan
prepared under a GEF project in 1999 (DWLC 1999b). In 2005 a fresh management plan
was prepared under the PAM & DWLC project.
Except for a small area (290 ha) within the Knuckles Range, namely, Campbell's Land
Forest Reserve (so declared in 1902) and another area of 2165 ha that had been earmarked
as the Dotulugala Proposed Reserve, all the rest of the Knuckles forest fell within the
category of other state forests under the Forest Department. In the 1950s some sections of
the Knuckles forest had been leased out to private individuals for under-planting with
cardamom.
In the 1980s the critically important role of the Knuckles range, as a key watershed of the
Mahaweli Ganga whose waters were being harnessed for irrigation and power supply,
began to be recognized. At the same time the forests in the range were coming to be noticed
as a hotspot of biodiversity, rich in endemic species, a fact later confirmed by the National
Conservation Review which ranked Knuckles as the island's richest forest for faunal
species (IUCN & WCMC 1997).
From the 1980s a series of steps were taken aimed at protecting the Knuckles forest. These
included the termination of cardamom cultivation leases, action taken against illicit
cultivators (by this time cultivation had spread well beyond the leased areas), and the
declaration of a large area as a Conservation Forest (done in the year 2000).
At the same time conservation studies were carried out in the forest, and with assistance
from IUCN, management plans were drawn up, the last in 1994 (IUCN 1994).
·
·
Horton Plains National Park
Knuckles Conservation Forest
194
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

3. Present management plans and objectives
·
·
PWPA
HPNP
The 1999 management plan for the Peak Wilderness Sanctuary was followed by a fresh
plan prepared in 2005 by DWLC entitled “Management Plan
Protected Area Complex (meaning Adam's Peak Range).
The objective of the 1999 plan is stated as follows:
To preserve the biodiversity and catchment capabilities of the sanctuary by
Enhancing the protection of the flora, fauna and other natural
elements of the sanctuary though appropriate systems, staff
structure and infrastructure
Providing opportunities for nature tourism, interpretation and
conservation education
Reducing the natural resource dependencies of the adjoining
communities on PWS through eco-development measures
Promoting research, monitoring and training in biodiversity
conservation.
The 2005 plan brings in an additional objective; it related to the provision of pilgrim
support. What needs to be done is explicitly to recognize Adam's Peak within the PWPA as
one of the most venerated places in the country and to take all necessary measures in order
to conserve the cultural values of the area.
Under the new arrangement, following the establishment of the PWPA in place of the PWS
and the consequential restriction of the DWLC's area of authority in the PWPA to the
nature reserve and what is left of the sanctuary, an operational plan that sets out the
activities assigned to the DWLC would be developed. With a much reduced area under its
control and the enhanced status of the area, the department would be in a better position to
consolidate and rationalize its activities in the PWPA
The three areas within the PWPA falling under the control of the Forest Department (Peak
Wilderness, Walawe Basin and Morahela conservation forests) will continue to be
managed by that department. At present, although management and conservation
activities are being carried out by the FD, there are no management plans prepared by the
department specifically for these three areas. It is proposed to develop an operational plan
for the management of the cluster of three conservation forests, taking into account the
conservation of both natural and cultural values.
This area is also covered by (a) a management plan prepared under the sponsorship of GEF
and covering the period 1999-2003 and (b) a management plan (more in form of an
operational plan as in the case of peak wilderness) prepared in 2005.
Samanala Adaviya
?
?
?
?
195
Appendix 3 (Management System)

The management goals as set out in the 1999 plan are as follows
To conserve the biodiversity of the HPNP landscape with special emphasis on the
flora and fauna
To protect the catchment of the three major rivers which originate inside HPNP
To promote nature tourism and preserve the ability of the system to sustain tourism
in the long run.
In order to achieve the goals the following objectives have been set out
To conserve the biological diversity and scenic beauty of HPNP, with special
emphasis on the maintenance of diverse habitats and associated fauna
To provide opportunities for conservation-compatible tourism, nature
interpretation and conservation education
To develop appropriate systems, staff structure and associated infrastructure for
effective law enforcement, resource protection and management
To promote research, monitoring and training in biodiversity conservation.
The goals and objectives set out in the 2005 plan do not differ significantly from the above.
The objectives and the operational details will be revised to include measures for
promoting the recognition, conservation and interpretation of the recently discovered
Mesolithic cultural sites. This will be done in collaboration with the cultural sector
institutions.
In the National Policy on Wildlife Conservation 2000 there is no reference to the need to
safeguard and to promote research in cultural sites within wildlife reserves. The need to
rectify this omission arises not only from the inclusion of HPNP as a constituent of the
property that is being nominated for inscription on the World Heritage List but also
because of the possible existence of culturally valuable monuments, many still awaiting
discovery, deep in the wildlife reserves. The revision of the National Wildlife Policy will
be given due consideration
Management planning for the Knuckles forest was initiated in 1988 and the outcome was
what was referred to as the Management Plan Phase 1. Technical assistance for this effort
was provided by IUCN. In 1994 a second plan, also supported by IUCN in its preparation,
was produced - Management Plan for the Conservation of the Knuckles Conservation
Forest (Phase II). The broad recommendations, which are not strictly time-bound, are still
valid, and the Forest Department has initiated a number of activities in pursuit of the
conservation objectives set out in the plan, while also going beyond the specific
recommendations in the plan.
The objective of management as set out in the plan is to conserve the Knuckles forest for
Protecting its biodiversity, endemism and the rare and unique natural habitats and
Its aesthetic, educational and scientific value; and
Improving and sustaining productive watershed characteristics which are
critically important for off-site irrigation and hydro-electric facilities and on-site
production systems.
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
KCF
?
?
?
196
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

As in the case of HPNP, there is no reference to the cultural aspects of KCF. Here too this
omission is due to the fact that the cultural features - Mesolithic artifacts and the cave
dwelling-places - were recent discoveries. A revised operational plan prepared with the
collaboration of the cultural sector would rectify this omission.
The Forest Ordinance, to be renamed the Forest Conservation Ordinance, is due to be
amended. According to the proposed amended ordinance, the highest category of
protected area will be the Strict Conservation Forest.
Once the new legislation comes into effect, the above three areas will be declared as
. The relevant section of the proposed revision to the Forest
Ordinance reads: “…unique ecosystems, genetic resources or physical and biological
formations and precisely delineated areas which constitute the habitat of threatened
species of plants and animals of outstanding and representative ecosystems, geological or
physical features or species of plants and animals for scientific or conservation purposes”,
and their importance as being “essential for enhancing the natural beauty of such land” and
for “conserving such areas for posterity with particular regard to biodiversity, soil and
water, and
values”. (Italics
added).
The proposed amendment to the Forest Ordinance will make it
for the
Conservator General of Forests to prepare management plans for the purposes of
preserving the aforesaid values and to implement such plans. Irrespective of this
anticipated mandatory provision, however, the FD will be taking action to prepare an
operational plan as stated earlier in this paper.
The sections of state land within what was until very recently the Peak Wilderness
Sanctuary, other than the FD forests and the limited areas that remain in the category of
sanctuary, have been declared a nature reserve. The legal provisions relating to a nature
reserve as well as to all other protected areas under the FFPO are to do with acts that are
prohibited within the reserve - acts that will be in conflict with the conservation values of
the protected areas. Since there is no restriction regarding the entry of persons to a
sanctuary, the pilgrim trails which will remain in the status of a sanctuary could be freely
used by visitors to the peak. Regarding the sections falling within the nature reserve there
is provision for permitting visiting, including the use of nature trails for observation, study,
etc.
A National Park is a highly protected area, according to the FFPO. The HPNP is the only
National Park in the island where visitors may walk along nature trails through the area. In
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə