Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   24

2. a. 3
Natural Features
Physiography
A traditional village dwelling at
Meemure, a village located within the
KCF
(Note: This dwelling constructed of
mud, with a court-yard, and apparently
built by an important personage, is a
remnant of an ancient construction
technology. The traditional thatched
roof has been recently replaced by
galvanized iron roofing)
© Studio Times
10
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
© Studio Times

The rim of the National Park has some remarkable features. Towards the west the land rises
to Kirigalpotha, a peak at an elevation of 2395 m, and towards the northeast there is an
equally sharp rise to Totapolakanda at an elevation of 2357 m. In contrast, towards the
south there is a sheer drop of nearly 1000 m down the escarpment referred to as the
, and the view from a point described as
stretches across the
broad plain of the low country and out to the sea beyond. Another picturesque spot is
Baker's Falls seen from the trail leading to World's End.
KCF is located in the very heart of the extremely rugged Knuckles massif which lies to the
northeast of Kandy and is separated from the Central Massif by the Kandy Plateau and the
Southern Wall
World's End
HPNP: a 2200 m tableland with grassland and cloud forest
© Studio Times
11
2. Description of the Property
The sacred peak at PWPA and the wet montane forest
Photo:S Balasubramanium © UoP

Dumbara valley. The main range trends in a southwest-northeast direction, with
southwestern slopes and northeast trending offshoots. It consists of peaks, a complex of
interconnected ranges, steep escarpments with near vertical rock faces, plateaux and river
valleys. Within the Knuckles Massif there are 35 peaks, of which 14 are over 1500 m in
altitude. The most spectacular among these is a set of five peaks which when viewed from
afar resemble the knuckles of a clenched fist, hence the name. The two highest peaks in the
mountain complex are Gombaniya (1906 m above msl) and the peak that bears the same
name as the range, Knuckles peak (1863 m) (Cooray 1998). In the middle of the Knuckles
Range there is a gently rolling expanse known as the Selvakanda plateau.
On the western side of the Knuckles range the land slopes moderately southwestwards into
the Hulu Ganga valley without any interruption. The tributaries of the Hulu Ganga flow
down the dip slopes of the Knuckles range, often carving out vertical-sided amphitheatres
which reach almost to the crest of the range. On the northeastern side of the range, there is a
series of stupendous rock escarpments overlooking the valleys of the Kalu Ganga, Heen
Ganga, and the Mahaweli Ganga itself. These escarpments fall hundreds of metres in sheer
vertical rock faces. Escarpments are, in fact, a major land form in the massif, often reaching
hundreds of metres in height. One of the characteristic features of the land-forms in the
whole massif is the alternation of dip slope and scarp slope providing a breath- taking
panoramic view of the range.
When the Knuckles forest was earmarked for conservation it was decided to take the 3500 ft
(1067 m) contour as the boundary. Subsequently this decision was changed and it was
decided to extend the limit to cover all contiguous forests even at lower elevations. This
directive led to some difficulty for the field surveyors when deciding on the patches of
forest that should be treated as “contiguous”, and in carrying out the survey many scrub
areas between patches of forest came to be included (IUCN 1994). The boundary now
The spectacular five peaks in the Knuckles Mountain range which resemble
the knuckles of a clenched fist.
12
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
© Pradeep Samarawickrama

extends down the mountain slope, particularly in a north-east trending arm, to an elevation
of c. 200 m. Hence the altitudinal range of what is now the Knuckles Conservation Forest
goes down from 1906 m to 200 m above msl. The topographical sheets (1:50,000) of the
Survey Department, however, still carry the 1067 m contour as the boundary of the
Knuckles Conservation Area.
Sri Lanka is a continental island lying close to the southern tip of the Indian subcontinent.
Though small in size (65,610 km ), its geological history is distinctive and remarkable.
Since the Palaeozoic era, and during the geological processes that shaped the world to what
it is today, one of the events of significance was the break up of the vast southern continent,
Gondwanaland. This took place towards the end of the Mesozoic era, around 100 million
years ago. One of the crustal plates formed from the break-up, the Deccan Plate, drifted
northwestwards towards the equator. Sri Lanka separated from the rest of the Deccan Plate
around the Miocene epoch (Wadia 1941). Since then, there have been fluctuations in the sea
level resulting in land connections with India at various times in the past.
Throughout its long geological history, except for a small part of its coastal plain in the
northwest, no other part of Sri Lanka had been subject to submergence at all and hence
contains no sedimentary rocks. The island represents a type of the earth's crust composed of
extremely ancient crystalline and metamorphic rocks, rocks which are the foundation on
which the geological framework of other parts of the earth is built (Wadia 1941).
It should be noted that many of the geological events that made Sri Lanka what it is today
took place well before Sri Lanka formed a separate entity i.e. when it was still a part of the
vast continent of Gondwanaland and later a part of the Deccan Plate. For this reason Sri
Lanka possesses a common geological structure, composition and plan of architecture with
peninsular India. It was only since the Miocene epoch that Sri Lanka became a separate
geographical entity and began to pursue its own course of geo-morphological evolution.
An event of particular significance in the geo-morphological evolution of Sri Lanka is the
upwarping of the land, believed to have occurred in different stages, separated by vast
intervals of time - intervals during which the uplifted land had been subjected to strong
erosive forces. The ceaseless sub-aerial decay of the land is estimated to have removed
from the original surface, at a conservative estimate, over 10,000 feet (3048m) depth of
rock, releasing in the process minerals that aggregated to form valuable gem-yielding
deposits (Wadia 1941). The richest of these is at the base of the Adam's Peak range towards
Ratnapura (Gunawardena 2002).
The mountain building events were all post-Jurassic, the latest believed to have occurred in
the Pliocene or even later (Wadia 1941).
Geologically, nine-tenths of Sri Lanka is made up of extremely ancient, highly crystalline
and metamorphic, non-fossiliferous rocks of Precambrian age. The crystalline rocks have
been subdivided into three main groups, each with its characteristic rock types, structure
and well-defined distribution. The three groups are (a) the Highland Series, (b) the South-
western Group and (c) the Vijayan Complex.
The Highland Series which covers the entire Central Highlands including all three
components of the property, is composed of two main types of rocks, namely,
Geology
2
,
13
2. Description of the Property

metasediments and charnokite gneisses. The metasediments, which are the
metamorphosed equivalents of sedimentary rocks, comprise garnet-sillimanite schists and
gneisses, quartzites and quartz schists, quartz feldspar granulites and garnetiferous
gneisses, marbles and calciphyres, and graphitifereous schists. The most striking of the
metasedimentary rocks are the garnet-sillimanite rocks, also referred to as khondalites.
These are metamorphosed clays and shales. The garnets are very large and turn into
rounded concretions of iron oxide on weathering. The quartzites are metamorphosed
sandstones. The quartz feldspar granulites and gneisses are a group of light coloured rocks
probably formed out of metamorphosed sandy clays or clayey sands. The marbles are
metamorphosed sedimentary limestones. Calcypyres are very impure calcareous rocks
formed by the metamorphism of calcareous muds and sands. Graphitiferous schists occur
as very narrow and relatively scarce bands, rich in graphite and sulphide minerals (Cooray
1984).
The charnokite gneisses (referred to locally as
) are the commonest rock types of
the Highland Series. They are dark greenish grey or bluish grey in colour. They vary
considerably in composition and texture. The origin of the charnokite gneisses is uncertain
but it is generally believed to have resulted from metamorphism, but whether the original
rock was sedimentary or igneous is not known (Cooray 1984). Thick charnokite bands
interlayered with marble and quartzites are found among major escarpments such as are
found in Adam's Peak and other places.
The most important structural features of the rocks of the Highland Series are foliation and
bedding. The former is characteristic of the gneissic rocks like charnokitic gneisses and
garnetiferous gneisses, while the latter is recognizable in some quartzites and marbles. The
rocks of the Highland Series have undergone faulting and folding. Four major episodes of
deformation have been recognized in the highlands. Evidence of these episodes can be
seen in the Knuckles region, where the main structure is a recumbent fold upon which, in a
subsequent episode, upright folds have been superimposed (Cooray 1998).
ll three components of the property possess the same basic soil type which is the
characteristic type in the wet zone of the country, both in the central highlands and the
lowlands; it is the
. These are highly leached soils in which the
clay accumulates in the subsurface horizon. Soils belonging to this group were earlier
referred to as lateritic soils and lateritic loams whose characteristic feature is a low silica-
sesquioxides ratio. Under natural vegetation, the A horizon is distinctly differentiated into
A and A horizons. The colour of the A horizon is dark grey-brown to dark brown, and the
predominant colour of the A horizon is a strong brown to yellowish brown. The difference
between A and A become less distinct, and the A horizon may thin out or even disappear
altogether under conditions of cultivation and erosion. The thickness of the B horizon is
highly variable and is usually over 100 cm, but may go up to 200 or 300 cm. The colour of
the B horizon is redder than the A horizon. The base saturation of the subsoil is less than 25
per cent and may drop well below this in high rainfall areas The soils are highly acidic in
reaction.
Variants of the modal soil type and other soil types of limited occurrence have been
described as occurring in PWPA, largely dependent on the gradient and rainfall. They are:
(i) fine-textured, acidic, well drained red-yellow podzolic soils occurring on hills with
moderate gradients and also in ridge and valley formations; (ii) reddish to yellowish soils,
kalugal
Red-Yellow Podzolic soils
Soils
A
1
2
1
2
1
2
14
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

moderately fine textured, strongly acidic, well drained, with a dark coloured layer in the
subsoil, usually occurring under forest on low rounded hills and undulating land; (iii)
mountain regosols occurring on high sloping terrain; and (iv) lithosols occurring on steep
rocky land, very shallow, without proper structure formation, juxtaposed with bare rock
(DWLC 1999a).
A subgroup of the red-yellow podzolic soils, referred to as meadow podzolic soils, is seen
in the grasslands of HPNP. The soil profile has a prominent A horizon of over 25 cm depth.
A peaty deposit forms surface accumulations of varying thickness, being particularly
prominent in the hollows. The soil is moist and often water-logged. The soil (in the B
horizon) is a very dark brown to very dark grey loam or sandy loam horizon underlain by a
yellowish brown sandy clay loam with some mottling in the lower depths. The base
saturation of the subsoil is lower than in the modal group and the reaction is moderately
acidic (Panabokke 1996, Kalpage 1967).
Red-yellow podzolic soils form the dominant soil group in KCF, accounting for 85 per cent
of the area covered by a study (Dimantha 1988). Other more localized soil types present are
wet mountain regosols and lithosols.
In Sri Lanka the main controlling climatic factor is rainfall. There are two basic rainfall
regimes in the island. In the southwest of the country there is rainfall throughout the year
with two peak periods corresponding to the southwest and northeast monsoons. Here the
annual rainfall is 2500 mm going up to 5000 mm or higher in different parts of what is
referred to as the wet zone. The other regime is a seasonally dry one where rainfall is less
than 1900 mm, with a dry period from June to August. This is referred to as the dry zone.
Between the dry zone and the wet zone a transitional zone (ecotone) referred to as the
intermediate zone is recognized.
A second climatic factor is the temperature. The annual mean temperature in the lowlands
is 27 C in the wet zone and 30 C in the dry zone. The temperature decreases with increase in
altitude at the approximate rate of 1 C for 160 m rise in altitude. In the montane region the
mean monthly temperature varies from 13 C to 16 C, with the night temperature
occasionally dropping to zero. Based on rainfall and temperature, six main bioclimatic
zones can be recognized. (See map). In considering the structure and composition of the
natural forest it becomes necessary to distinguish the lower elevations within the area
broadly referred to as the montane zone as the submontane zone. The major part of the
nominated property falls into the wet montane and submontane zones. As PWPA and KCF
straddle the respective mountain ranges, they also include sections that fall into the mid
country wet zone, the submontane intermediate zone, and the midcountry intermediate
zone. Small sections at the lower elevations in the fringes of KCF towards the north-east
fall within the dry zone (monsoon forest). The whole of HPNP falls into the montane wet
zone, albeit at the lower end of the wet zone rainfall range.
Small though the total area of the Central Highlands is, nearly all the river systems in the
country originate in this region. Rainfall data from stations close to the PWPA suggest that
the rainfall in this area is at the higher end of the wet zone range. The mean annual rainfall is
given as 4320 mm (IUCN &WCMC 1997). The PWPA covers the head catchments of two
major rivers, the Kelani Ganga and the Kalu Ganga, while the Walawe Ganga which arises
1
Climate and Hydrology
0
0
0
0
0
15
2. Description of the Property

in the adjoining Horton Plains runs through the eastern sector of the Peak Wilderness
range. A study of the 281 forest blocks in the island that are over 200 ha in area (for their
importance in terms of soil and water conservation) has placed the PWPA (referred to as
the Peak Wilderness Sanctuary), which covers most of the Adam's Peak Range, as the
most important in terms of protecting the headwaters of the rivers, controlling floods and
intercepting fog, and it is ranked fourth in terms of controlling soil erosion.
In HPNP the average annual rainfall is 2534 mm, which is towards the lower end of the wet
zone range. As stated earlier, the head waters of the Walawe Ganga is in Horton Plains. The
climate is humid, and a short dry spell may occur between January and March. During this
period it is not unusual for fires to occur, mostly man induced. The mean annual
temperature is 13-15 C. The night temperature may drop to below zero and it is not
uncommon to see ground frost during the months that correspond to the northern winter.
In KCF a good part of the area receives heavy, intense rainfall, mostly during the period
November to February. Considerable variations have been observed in the annual rainfall
recorded in locations even a few kilometers apart. The annual average rainfall varies from
2540 mm to double that 5080 mm. The entire drainage system of the Knuckles massif
belongs to the Mahaweli Ganga system. On the west is the Hulu Ganga, the tributaries of
which flow south-westwards down the dip slopes of the Knuckles range. The river then
flows in a southeasterly direction to join the Mahaweli Ganga. On the northeast of the
massif are the Teligam Oya, Kalu Ganga, Heen Ganga and Hasalaka Oya, all of which join
the Mahaweli Ganga at different points.
The annual mean temperature at the elevation of 915 m above msl ranges from 13 to
18.5 C and it drops further with increase in elevation. The monsoonal winds are strong,
often reaching gale force. This causes stunting of the vegetation in areas that are most
severely affected.
Due to Sri Lanka's evolutionary history as a component of the Deccan Plate during its
northwards drift since the beginning of the Tertiary period and right up to the Miocene, and
with land connections also occurring since then up to the Holocene, the island shares many
biotic taxa with peninsular India. Of the 173 families of angiosperms, 167 are peninsular;
of the 1038 non-endemic genera 942 are peninsular; and of 2002 non endemic species
1841 are peninsular (Abeywickrama 1956).
Much of the information on the flora provided in this nomination relates to woody,
angiosperm species, as data on the other groups which have been inadequately studied are
scarce. On a positive note, it has been shown for woody plants in Sri Lanka that higher
taxon richness can be used as a surrogate for total species richness (Balmford et al. 1996a,
1996b).
Among the fauna, the island's mollusca show evidence of Sri Lanka's long association
with peninsular India. Of the 60 genera of land snails recorded in Sri Lanka, 13 are also
found in peninsular India, primarily in the Western Ghats; and about 50% of all the snail
species found in Sri Lanka belong to genera confined only to southern India and Sri Lanka
(Raheem et al. 2000, as cited in Ranawana 2006). Similarly, the Sri Lankan dragonflies
show many affinities with those of South India, despite the high level of species endemism
0
0
Biology
16
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

(approaching 50%) within this group (Bedjanic 2006). Seven species of bees found in Sri
Lanka are confined to India and Sri Lanka (Karunaratne & Edirisinghe 2006). Among the
reptiles, Sri Lanka's
spp. show close affinities with members of this genus in
North India (Batuwita & Bahir 2005).
Taxonomic affinities with species in the Indian peninsula are also seen among mammals
and birds where their increased mobility would have promoted faunal migrations that
would have occurred during the Pleistocene when land connections were formed with the
peninsula. For example,
,
and
are endemic to Sri Lanka but bear close similarities with the Indian
respectively, denoting common ancestry.
While showing close affinities with peninsular India, the biota of Sri Lanka also include
many species with affinities to the biota of other lands that once formed a part of the giant
continent of Gondwanaland i.e the Palaeartic, Australian and Afro-tropical regions. The
Laurasian element is also represented in species with affinities to the Himalayan and SE
Asian biota. As pointed out by Jayasuriya et al. (1993), in their paper on phytosociological
studies of the “lower montane” evergreen forests, “The rare occurrence of genera such as
,
(Lauraceae),
(Magnoliaceae),
(Symplocaceae)
and
(Ulmaceae) suggest remote Laurasian relationships”. This is in accordance with
the widely accepted view that the Sri Lanka flora had been enriched during the Tertiary by
floristic elements from Laurasian land masses in what is now the Malesian region. This
also applies to the fauna.
The total number of indigenous plant species in Sri Lanka is around 7000. This includes
over 3000 angiosperms. Despite the affinities of its biota with those of other countries,
particularly peninsular India, what is remarkable about the indigenous species of Sri Lanka
is the extraordinary high level of species endemicity. Of the angiosperm species, 845 are
endemic to the island (Ashton & Gunatilleke 1987a). Kostermans (1992) states that the
endemic angiosperm species number around 880, and they account for nearly 30% of the
indigenous flora within the group. Among the pteridophytes, 57 of 314 species are
endemic. As remarked by Ashton & Gunatilleke (1987a), it is the extraordinary endemicity
that occurs mainly at specific and intraspecific rank which one cannot assume to be of very
ancient origin which makes the Sri Lankan flora of such outstanding interest.
The indigenous faunal species include 678 species of vertebrates (and a further 262 species
of migrant birds). Amphibian diversity is particularly high, with 102 valid species so far
described and the prospect of more species coming to light with the ongoing surveys.
Although most of the invertebrate taxa have been incompletely surveyed at best,
information currently available indicates very high levels of species diversity in several
groups. Particularly speciose are land snails with 246 species (Ranawana 2006). Surveys
to date have also revealed 116 dragonfly species (from 67 genera), 148 species of bees
(from 38 genera), 525 species of carabid beetles from 140 genera, 501 species of spiders
(despite being considered very inadequately sampled), and 243 species of butterflies.
As with the flora, the fauna too exhibit high levels of endemism. In the vertebrates
(excluding 262 migrant birds) 39% species are endemic. Endemicity is highest among the
Cyrtodactylus
Semnopithecus vetulus
Macaca sinica
Paradoxurus
zeylonensis
S. johnii,
M. radiata and P. jerdoni
Cinnamomum Litsea
Michelia
Symplocos
Celtis
1
1
Synonymous with Trachypithecus vetulus
17
2. Description of the Property

freshwater fishes (54%), amphibia (85%), and reptiles (50%). (Details of endemism
among the fishes are given in Pethiyagoda 2006). As new species are constantly being
discovered among the herpetofauna, the number of endemics is likely to increase in the
future. Endemism among the mammals and birds is relatively low (<20%). Among the 246
species of snails endemism is as high as 83% (Naggs & Raheem 2000). Endemicity in
some of the other faunal groups on which information is available is: dragonflies 46%,
butterflies 8%, and carabid beetles 24%. Ten genera of carabid beetles are endemic
(MOFE 1999).
The endemic biotas are concentrated in a most extraordinary way in the wet southwest of
the country. This area, the wet zone, covers only 23% of the land area of the country but
around 90% of the endemic biota, both flora and fauna, are restricted to this area. Within
this small land area, there is a range of altitudinal gradation from sea level to over 2500 m
above msl. Approximately half of the endemic species are found in the lowlands and mid-
country and the rest in the montane and submontane area.
The property is situated in the mountainous parts of the country, PWPA and HPNP in the
Central Massif and KCF in the Knuckles massif. The mountainous region (represented by
the three components of the property) covers only a very small area of the country and
hence, except for HPNP which is a high elevation tableland and is situated in its entirety in
what can definitely be recognized as the montane zone, the other two components spread
over the montane and submontane zones, and parts of their peripheral areas extend beyond
the submontane zone into the mid-country. In the case of KCF, a northeast trending arm
extends down to an elevation of 200 m, at which elevation the area corresponds to the
lowland moist monsoon, forest formation. Although sections of the property extend
beyond the wet montane and submontane zones, the unique and exceptional features of the
property as regards biodversity relate to the montane and submontane areas.
The natural forests of the montane and submontane zones, though occurring within an area
having a similar rainfall regime to that of the wet zone lowlands, are a marked contrast in
© Studio Times
Flat topped canopy trees at Horton Plains: a characteristic feature of montane forests
18
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

their structure and physiognomy to the typical lowland rainforest. The latter are
multistoried, with the dominant canopy reaching heights of 30-40 metres, and the
dominant trees have long straight boles and large rounded crowns. As one moves upwards
in altitude, the dominant trees are seen to be shorter in stature and the forest assumes a
reduced, two-storey structure. The tree boles tend to become shorter and, at the highest
elevations, the branches of the trees are seen to be twisted and gnarled, and the crowns
become flattened at the top. The trees of the montane forest are mostly microphyllous in
contrast to the large leaved trees in the lowland forests. These changes are most marked at
the highest elevations where the dominant trees barely reach a height of five metres in
height. In some areas of the central highlands the dominant vegetation is grassland; in fact
the vegetation over a good part of HPNP consists predominantly of grasses mixed with
other herbaceous flora.
The wet zone of Sri Lanka is now widely regarded as a biodiversity hotspot i.e. an area
with an exceptional concentration of species with a high level of endemism and facing
exceptional threats of destruction (Myers 1990, Myers et al. 2000, Cincotta et al. 2000).
Of the species-rich wet zone flora, the montane and submontane zones represent a distinct
element. There are clear differences in the composition of the fauna and flora in the natural
forest formations of the montane and submontane zones as compared to the lowlands .
Deforestation and exploitation of natural forests throughout the wet zone have left only
scattered fragments amounting, in total, to a bare eight per cent of the zonal land area. This
has led to the large majority of endemic species being placed under severe threat of
extinction. The montane and submontane areas despite their relative inaccessibility have
not escaped this trend and at present the nominated property represents the only sizable
extents of near pristine areas of natural montane and submontane forest vegetation still
remaining. The endemic species found in these areas are highly localized in their
distribution even within a given forest.
While the difference between what is called the montane and submontane zones may be
recognized in terms of elevation and the structure and composition of the forest, there can
2
2
Reference has to be made to the expression “lowlands” and other terms used by different authors to
denote altitudinal levels particularly in relation to the occurrence of natural forest formations in Sri
Lanka. Ashton and Gunatilleke (1987b) refer to the areas up to 1000 m in altitude as lowlands.
Koelmeyer (1957) refers to the land up to 1000 ft (304 m) as lowlands. Panabokke (1996) considers
land below 300 m as low country, between 300 and 900 m as mid-country and over 900 m as up-
country. De Rosayro (1942), a pioneer in forest ecological research in Sri Lanka, did not refer to
lowlands as such. He described the natural forests occurring up to 914 m as Wet Evergreen Forest,
and the area above this as the “montane zone”. Holmes (1956) states that at 914 m the typical
midland (mid-country) wet evergreen forest can be recognized and that the montane forest occurs
over 1476 m. Jayasuriya et al. (1993) refer to the area between 900 and 1400 m as mid-elevation or
lower montane. As a result of use of these different expressions, there arises some confusion in
naming the types of natural forest that occur at different altitudes based on published literature. So
as to adopt a rational system of terminology in this nomination, we recognize the following terms as
indicated against each: lowlands (as in lowland tropical rainforest) for altitudes up to 500 m, which
approximates to the lowest peneplain and includes also the foothills leading up to the second
peneplain (Wickramagamage 1998); mid-country from 500 m to 1000 m, which is the second
peneplain and includes also the foothills of the third peneplain; and over 1000 m and up to the
maximum elevation of 2524m as submontane and montane.
19
2. Description of the Property

be no generally applicable defined level at which one ends and the other begins. The
montane forests are also referred to as cloud forests, and the cloud base may be taken as the
lower limit of the montane forest formation. The altitude of the transition zone between
submontane and montane varies from place to place. Generally the larger the mountainous
region the higher the elevation at which the transition to montane forest occurs. Hence, as
pointed out by Singhakumara (1995), the montane forest occurs at a lower elevation in the
Knuckles range than at Peak Wilderness.
The exceptional features of the flora (which also applies to the fauna) in the areas now
being selected for nomination as a World Heritage have been recognized by Ashton and
Gunatilleke (1987a) who have assigned the tiny (in relation to the country as a whole) areas
covered by the three components of the property into three distinct floristic regions, out of a
total of only 15 for the whole island. (See map).
A characteristic feature of the montane and submontane forests is the patchiness in the
distribution of species. The composition of the dominant species changes from place to
place within the same forest as seen in the studies of floristic composition carried out by
plant ecologists using sample plots distributed over a forest area. This is a reflection of the
patchiness of habitat conditions occasioned by the variations in temperature, rainfall, soil,
aspect, etc. that occurs over short distances, mainly due to the highly dissected nature of the
terrain. As stated earlier, the nature of the land is the result of the strong erosive forces that
have acted on the elevated land mass over vast periods of time.
The data on biodiversity presented in this nomination were drawn from many sources, one
of which is the National Conservation Review of the forests in the island that was carried
out from 1991 to 1996 (IUCN & WCMC 1997). A similar study, but on a far smaller scale,
was carried out very recently (DWLC 2007) in four protected areas (which were also
among the areas surveyed in the earlier exercise) with a view to obtaining baseline
biodiversity data for future monitoring. Unlike in the previous survey, the recent study was
based on identified habitats within the sampled areas. Moreover, the locations of sampling
were geo-referenced so as to enable comparable information to be obtained in future
monitoring. The taxonomic groups covered were vascular plants, mammals, birds, reptiles,
amphibians and fishes. Two of the four areas surveyed are in the dry zone and two in the wet
zone. The wet zone areas are PWPA and HPNP, two of the three constituents of the property.
Data from the baseline survey in relation to these two areas were included when compiling
this nomination.
PWPA is the largest block of pristine and near-pristine montane and submontane rainforest
in Sri Lanka. This area has not generally been favoured by scientists for biological
exploration primarily because of its very rugged terrain, making access to, and traversing
within, the forest extremely difficult. Notwithstanding these constraints, some few studies
that have been carried out and these have revealed the characteristic features of this
remarkably interesting component of the tropical humid forest biome. It is extremely rich
in biodiversity and endemism and it has within it the great majority of the faunal and
floristic species of Sri Lanka's montane and submontane zones.
The common tree species are
(Clusiaceae);
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə