Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə4/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   24

PWPA
Flora
?
Calophyllum walkeri, C. trapezifolium, C. cuneifolium,
Garcinia echinocarpa
Cinnamomum ovalifolium, Neolitsea fuscata,
20
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Actinodaphne speciosa, Litsea
Syzygium revolutum. S. rotundifolium, S.
sclerophyllum, Eugenia mabaeoides
Symplocos major, S. spicata, S. elegans
Adinandra lasiopetala, Gordonia ceylanica, Eurya japonica
Calophyllum
. C. walkeri
Elaeocarpus montanus, Euonymus revolutus,
Meliosma simplicifolia, Michelia nilagirica, Olea polygama, Rhododendron arboreum
Vaccinium leschenaultii
Strobilanthes
Impatiens
Arundinaria
Hedyotis
Psychotria
spp. (Lauraceae);
(Myrtaceae);
(Symplocaceae); and
(Theaceae). The
species are the most prominent among these, with their
rusty-red young leaves visible even from a distance
is not only prominent in
many areas but also surpasses the canopy level by several metres, with the trunks attaining
diameters of around 100 cm at breast height (dbh) (Werner1982).
Other widespread woody species are
and
. Among the shrub species characteristic of the montane cloud
forest are species of
(Acanthaceae),
(Balsaminaceae),
(Poaceae), and
and
(Rubiaceae).
Reference must be made to two very important studies of the flora of PWPA that have been
carried out using sample plots. These studies have provided a great deal of information on
the floristic composition and distribution within this biodiversity-rich area of montane and
submontane rain forest and have brought out another characteristic feature of this
ecosystem, namely, the highly localized distribution of species.
In the study carried out by Singhakumara (1995) three forest formations were recognized,
namely, montane, sub-montane, and, what he has termed lowland, but which we
categorize as mid-country as the elevations of the sample plots within this part of the forest
range from 805 m to 1060 m. In the montane zone (1650 m and above), the following three
The endemic
found at
PWPA and Horton Plains: a dominant canopy
tree in montane forests
Calophyllum walkeri
© Studio Times
© Samantha Mirandu
Left: Young flush of Calophylllum walkeri
21
2. Description of the Property

forest communities, named after the dominants in each, were identified: (i)
association. (ii)
association; and (iii)
,
association. Mention must be made here of the occurrence of
(in the
endemic subfamily of Hortonoideae in the family Monimiaceae) both in the montane and
midcountry areas.
At a lower altitude, in the submontane area, five associations were identified, namely, (i)
association (ii)
association (iii)
association (iv)
association; and (v)
association.
The mid-country forest that was sampled occurs only in a very limited area in the periphery
of the PWPA. The formations encountered here were: (i)
formation; (ii)
association; and
association.
Referring to the range of forest types encountered, the author, Singhakumara, makes the
noteworthy comment that none of the four forest communities described by De Rosayro
(1942) in what we here recognize as the lowlands could be identified in any part of the Peak
Wilderness.
The plant associations are named after the dominant trees that lend character to the
community. There are numerous other species, some in the canopy layer itself but mainly in
the sub-canopy and lower levels.
Greller et al. (1987) carried out a study of the tree species in five stands in four locations in
the Peak Wilderness Sanctuary (now the PWPA) where species of
occurred
as dominant components of the vegetation. Three species of
were found to
be canopy dominant in different stands:
,
and
. Greller &
Balasubramaniam (1993) in a later paper recognized the following communities where in
each case a species of
associated with another species formed the dominant
canopy:
,
community,
,
sp
community;
,
community; and
community. The
occurrence of
as a dominant in these stands at high elevations is indeed a
unique feature of the PWPA forest.
Interestingly, five species of
observed by Singhakumara,
and S.
were not present in the
locations sampled by Greller et al. (1987). They report that a striking feature of their study is
that in each of the four locations only one species of
occurred indicating a
highly localized distribution. With some marginal exceptions, this was also the general
pattern of distribution observed by Singhakumara (1995).
Stemonoporus,
Garcinia, Calophyllum, Palaquium
Calophyllum, Palaquium, Garcinia,
Pseudocarpa
Calophyllum, Garcinia, Syzygium
Palaquium
Hortonia floribunda
Stemonoporus angustisepalum, Carallia calycina
Stemonoporus
cordifolius, Stemonoporus angustisepalum
Shorea, Stemonoporus,
Kokoona, Elaeocarpus
Stemonoporus, Syzygium, Litsea, Palaquium
Shorea, Stemonoporus, Bhesa, Litsea, Adinandra, Syzygium,
Calophyllum
Shorea, Strombosia, Palaquium,
Cullenia, Trichadenia, Cyathocalyx, Mastixia, Urandra
Shorea affinis ,
Shorea dyeri, Cyathocalyx, Palaquium, Homalium, Myristica, Bhesa
Shorea trapezifolia, Syzygium, Urandra, Trichadenia, Dipterocarpus zeylanicus, Bhesa,
Anisophyllea
Stemonoporus
Stemonoporus
S. gardneri S. cordifolius
S. rigidus
Stemonoporus
Stemonoporus rigidus Garcinia echinocarpa
Stemonoporus rigidus
Alphonsea
.
Stemonoporus cordifolius
Cinnamonum ovalifolium
Stemonoporus gardneri, Palaquium rubinigosum
Stemonoporus
Stemonoporus
S. angustisepalum,
S. canaliculatus, S. lanceolatus S elegans
oblongifolius
Stemonoporus
3
,
3
Shorea affinis
S. trapezifolia
Doona affinis
D.trapezifolia
and
now retain the former names:
and
22
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Referring to the occurrence of
at high altitudes as seen in Sri Lanka, Greller
et al. (1987) state that no other dipterocarps in Sri Lanka, possibly in the world, exceed
them in elevation of occurrence. The presence of
and
at the montane zone elevation (Singhakumara 1995) supports this statement.
The local endemism and apparent sympatry manifested by
as seen in PWPA
is said to be without parallel among the other dipterocarps (Ashton & Gunatilleke 1987a).
The distribution pattern of the dipterocarps as a whole in the wet zone (including the
lowlands) appear to exhibit allopatric radiation in relation to altitude, topography and
possibly soil and structural niche differentiation (Ashton & Gunatilleke 1987a).
What is remarkable is the wealth of information that just two studies of the PWPA forest
have brought out, suggesting that further ecological studies in this largely biologically
unexplored area may yield a great deal of valuable scientific information.
Arboresent species occurring in all the sampled localities were
,
,
species, and
.
A fuller list of species than provided here occurring in PWPA is given in Appendix 1.
The five dominant families and species (in the areas sampled by Sinhakumara 1995)
occurring in the montane and submontane zones calculated on the basis of the Importance
Value Index as given by him are as follows:
: Families: Clusiaceae, Myrtaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Dipterocarpaceae,
Sapotaceae; Species:
Families: Myrtaceae, Anacardiaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Lauraceae,
Dipterocarpaceae; Species:
-
,
This survey (confined to individuals over 5 cm dbh) recorded a total of 491 identified
species representing 262 genera and 108 families. There were 88 unidentified specimens
and 12 identified only to family level. Of the species, 192, in 45 families, are endemics.
There are 19 endemic genera in the island (Mabberley 1989, as cited in Singhakumara
1995; Bandaranayake & Sultanbawa 1991). Of these, nine are found in PWPA. They are:
Stemonoporus
S. cordifolius, S. gardneri
S.
oblongifolius
Stemonoporus
Actinodaphne speciosa
Calophyllum walkeri Garcinia echinocarpa, Gordonia
Timonius flavescens
Calophyllum trapezifolium Garcinia echinocarpa, Agrostistachys
coriacea, Bhesa montana, Palaquium rubinigosum.
Semecarpus nigro viridis Agrostistachys coriacea, Syzygium
cordifolium, Bhesa montana, Timonius flavescens.
Montane forest
Submontane forest:
23
2. Description of the Property
Endemic dipterocarps at PWP :
( left ) and
( right )
A Stemenoporus oblongifolius
S. gardineri
Photo:S Balasubramanium © UoP
Photo:S Balasubramanium © UoP

Championia, Hortonia, Leucocodon, Loxococcus, Nargedia, Phoenicanthus,
Schumacheria, Scyphostachys
Stemonoporus
localized
and
(modified after Singhakumara 1995).
The study carried out by Singhakumara indicated that the diversity index was higher at the
lower altitudes. Plant endemicity, however, increased with increasing altitude, being
highest in the montane area. Ashton and Gunatilleke (1987a) have named the Peak
Wilderness area as Floristic Region 14. (See map).
A total of over 3000 indigenous species of flowering plants, representing about 1070
genera and 180 families are found in the island as a whole. Of the species, 880 are endemic.
Ninety five per cent of the endemic species are restricted to the wet southwest of the
country. Of the endemic species, 284 are confined to the montane and submontane zones
(best represented by the PWPA, HPNP and KCF), while 129 are found in the same two
zones as well as at lower elevations (Gunatilleke & Gunatilleke 1990). Even within each
zone there is highly localized distribution of species. Ashton and Gunatilleke (1987a) have
pointed out that 25 of 62 species showing localized distribution within the montane zone
are confined to the Peak Range (PWPA and HPNP).
Referring to the species richness of Peak Wilderness and Horton Plains, Davis et al. (1995)
have noted that these two areas share between them over 1000 species of vascular plants.
Of this rich mountain flora, nearly half have a
distribution within the
mountainous region.
Table 2.1: Data on mainly woody plant species in PWPA
(Sources of information: Balasubramaniam et al. 1993, Bambaradeniya & Ekanayake 2003,
Jayasuriya et al. 1993, Greller et al. 1987, Gunatilleke et al. 1996, IUCN & WCMC 1997,
DWLC 2007. For species lists see Appendix 1).
Flowers of the endemics
and
Gordonia speciosa
Christisonia tricolor
No. of species
Endemic species
% endemic
Globally threatened species
555
277
50
147
No. of species
No. endemic
% endemic
No. nationally
threatened
No. epiphytic
121
57
47
79
78
(Sources of information: Fernando 2005, Dassanayake & Fosberg 1981)
24
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
Photo:S Balasubramanium © UoP
Photo:S Balasubramanium © UoP

An outstanding feature of the flora of the montane and submontane rainforest within the
property is the presence of a vast number of orchid species, a large majority of which are
epiphytes. In PWPA, well over half the species are rare and considered nationally
threatened. The other two constituent areas share a good many of these species, but species
richness is appreciably lower in Horton Plains where a good part of the area is grassland.
For further details see Appendix 1. The orchid species data for PWPA are given in Table
2.2.
There are small forest plantations of the exotic species
and
and of the naturalized exotic
in the Peak Wilderness area,
totaling 383 ha. These plantations were raised between 1974 and 1988 (DWLC1999a).
Some of these plantations are said to be of exploitable age and the management plan
recommends that they be felled. Such a course of action is desirable since it would be out of
place to have commercially managed plantations within the property.
Due to the wide altitudinal amplitude spanning over 1500 m within the PWPA, this
component of the nominated property contains varied ecosystems that support a
remarkable array of Sri Lankan fauna characteristic of many of the wet zone forest
formations in the island. Endemicity among the vertebrates is 37 % and in this respect it
ranks higher than the other two constituents of the nominated property. A recently
concluded biodiversity baseline survey has added more data to what was available (DWLC
2007). The information currently available indicates that 65 vertebrate families and 158
genera are represented in PWPA. Thirty-four of the vertebrate species are considered to be
globally threatened. The data are summarized in Table 2.3.
PWPA, with a perhumid climate, is crossed by numerous streams that provide habitats for a
varied freshwater fauna. While indigenous freshwater fish species from past surveys
number only12, it is significant that 83% are endemic. They include
(Ornate paradise-fish) from an endemic monotypic genus. Among the freshwater crabs,
the endemic
(with a range of only 1 km ) and the globally threatened
endemic
are restricted to the PWPA (Bahir and Ng 2005).
Table 2.2: Orchid species in PWPA
Table 2.3: Data on vertebrate species in PWPA
Pinus caribaea
Eucalyptus
grandis
Albizia falcataria
Malpulutta kretseri
Perbrinkia gabadagei
P. enodis
Fauna
2
Families Genera Species
Endemics
%
endemic
Globally
threatened
species
Freshwater fishes*
6
10
12
10
83
-
Amphibians
3
11
27
22
81
17
Reptiles
7
21
36
20
56
1
Birds**
34
91
123
23
19
9
Mammals
15
25
28
9
32
7
Total
65
158
226
84
37
34
* excluding introduced species. ** including 9 winter visitors
25
2. Description of the Property

With its varied forest formations and dense vegetation, PWPA provides excellent
conditions for habitat partitioning among a multitude of amphibian species. To date 27
amphibian species have been recorded. This is more than the number found in HPNP and
only one less than in KCF. Eighty-one per cent of the species are endemic, a higher degree
than at KCF.
Among the amphibians in PWPA is
from an endemic genus. This
species is clearly allopatric with
which inhabits the geographically
separated part of the property, KCF.
, from a monotypic endemic
genus, is found in PWPA and KCF. PWPA contains 12 species of
, of which 11 are
globally threatened. Seven species of
listed as globally threatened in the 2006
IUCN Red List have been recorded only at PWPA of the three constituent areas. A toad,
, from an endemic genus, and listed as globally threatened, has been found
only at Moray estate in the buffer zone of PWPA.
PWPA has at least 36 species of reptiles, from 21 genera and seven families. Of the species,
56% are endemic, including six agamid lizards, of which three are from two relict endemic
genera. They are
and
(confined to higher
elevations above 2000 m, and clearly allopatric with
inhabiting the KCF), and
the lyre head lizard. The last mentioned is rare, with a density of
about two individuals per km at this site (DWLC, 1999a). C
has a
density of 26 individuals per km at the PWPA. PWPA has seven species of endemic skinks,
of which five are from the endemic and relict genus
.
PWPA provides diverse habitats for birds, and bird diversity is particularly high at the
lower elevations. Altogether 123 species, from 91 genera and 34 families, have been
recorded. Of the species, 114 are residents, and among these are 23 of the island's 25
endemic bird species. These endemics include the globally threatened
(Red-faced Malkoha),
(Sri Lanka Green-billed
Coucal) and
(Sri Lanka Ashy-headed Laughing Thrush) which have
not been recorded from the KCF or HPNP The rainforest at the foothills of the PWPA
(within what could be called the buffer zone of the property) also contain a large number of
mixed-species bird flocks. Endemic bird species such as
Sri Lanka
Yellow-fronted Barbet) and
(Sri Lanka Yellow-eared Bulbul) are
common in this forest and the former occurs at densities exceeding 75 individuals per km
(DWLC, 1999a).
The mammalian fauna have only very recently been comprehensively surveyed in the Peak
Wilderness (DWLC 2007), and what have been recorded are 28 species, from 15 families
and 25 genera, of which nine species (32%) are endemic. PWPA has a small herd of 6-8
elephants which range up to 2000 m, the highest elevation at which elephants have been
recorded in this country. Mammals such as sambur, mouse deer, barking deer and wild boar
are found within PWPA. This forest also has about 15 leopards of the endemic subspecies
(
(DWLC 1999a). Studies of scat samples have shown that the
endemic purple-faced leaf monkey is the top prey species of these leopards, followed by
barking deer, sambur, and, interestingly,
and
(DWLC 1999a).
The otter (
) inhabits the streams of the sub-montane areas of the PWPA (
).
There is one species of
the endemic and globally threatened
This
species is restricted to elevations below 700 m (Molur et al. 2003).
.
(
Nannophrys ceylonensis
N. marmorata
Lankanectes corrugatus
Philautus
Philautus
Adenomus dasi
Ceratophora aspera
Ceratophora stoddartii
C. tennentii
Lyriocephalus scutatus,
eratophora stoddartii
Lankascincus
Phaenicophaeus
pyrrhocephalus
Centropus chlororhynchos
Garrulax cinereifrons
Megalaima flavifrons
Pycnonotus penicillatus
Panthera pardus kotiya)
Rattus montanus
R. ohiensis
Lutra lutra
ibid.
Loris,
Loris tardigradus.
2
2
2
26
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Rasboroides vaterifloris (the
golden rasbora) found at
PWPA
Deignan's Lanka skink
from
an endemic genus, found at
PWPA
(Lankascincus deignani)
The endemic
(Sri Lanka spot-
winged thrush), also found at
HPNP.
Zoothera
spiloptera
The globally threatened
(fishing cat)
Prionailurus viverrinus
found at all three sites
27
2. Description of the Property
© Ruchira Somaweera
© Ruchira Somaweera
© Ruchira Somaweera
© Ruchira Somaweera

Of the 34 globally threatened vertebrate species recorded from PWPA, 28 are endemic to
Sri Lanka. These include 17 endemic amphibian species, among which are
(corrugated water frog) and
(Sri Lanka rock frog)
from two relict genera.
Among the globally threatened mammals at this site are the following: the fishing cat
(
); the endemics
, purple-faced langur
(
) and the toque macaque (
); the giant squirrel
(
); and the critically endangered endemic
PWPA also provides the last protected wet zone montane habitat in Sri Lanka for the
elephant
a globally threatened flagship species.
A good part of Horton Plains, which has an area of 3109 ha, comprises a rolling landscape
of grasslands forming the highest tableland in the country. In the balance part of HPNP, the
land rises towards the mountains of Totapolakanda and Kirigalpotha and the area is
covered by montane rainforest or cloud forest. The tableland is covered by frost hardy
grasses and other herbaceous flora and dwarf bamboo.
A characteristic feature of the grasslands is the occurrence of undulating knolls or
hummocks interspersed with depressions or troughs. These variations in terrain provide
micro-habitats for rare plants and animals. The slow-flowing streams in Horton Plains
have a characteristic collection of aquatic vegetation.
The dominant grass species are
and
.
Lankanectes
corrugatus
Nannophrys ceylonensis
Prionailurus viverrinus
Loris tardigradus
Semnopithecus vetulus
Macaca sinica
Ratufa macrura
Rattus montanus.
(Elephas maximus),
Chrysopogon zeylanicus
Arundinella villosa
HPNP
Flora
?
This species is referred to as
by Wijesundara (2007).
4
Sinarundinaria densifolia
28
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
Montane
grasslands
with patches of
and short
stature montane
cloud forest
at HPNP
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə