Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə5/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   24

Rhododendron
arboreum
© Studio Times

Associated species of grasses, sedges and other herbaceous plants are:
spp
,
(a dwarf bamboo species),
spp.,
and the endemics
and
Because of the presence in Horton Plains of some
of the northern temperate elements, amongst which are endemic species, this assemblage
of montane taxa, comprising as it does species of both Laurasian and Gondwanic origin, is
of exceptional interest
.
Scattered in the grassland are small patches of forest dominated by
, as well as individual trees of the same species. Associated with
in the forest patches are
,
and
. The trees are stunted and the branches are festooned with the lichen
. Interestingly, the three Ericaceae tree species of
and
referred to above are of eastern Himalayan affinity.
While the origin of the grasslands remains in dispute, it is likely that the frost-hardy
grassland flora of Horton Plains and those of Nilgiris and Annamalais in India have
persisted in frost pockets in the valleys of the major massifs since the last north temperate
glaciation (Ashton and Gunatilleke 1987a).
In a floristic survey of the Horton Plains montane forest, Balasubramaniam et al. (1993)
have recorded 57 species of woody plants (with dbh over 5 cm) belonging to 43 genera and
30 families. The National Conservation review (IUCN & WCMC 1997) has recorded 79
woody plant species belonging to 56 genera and 33 families. Lauraceae, Symplocaceae
and Myrtaceae are among the dominant families while
and
are
the dominant species. Other woody species in this forest formation include
Cyanotis pilosa,
Osbeckia
parvifolia, Anaphalis brevifolia, Wahlenbergia marginata, Viola pilosa,
Pedicularis zeylanica, Senecio
., Gentiana quadrifaria, Alchemilla indica, Ischaemum
ciliare Arundinaria densifolia
Carex
Anaphalis
brevifolia, Valeriana moonii
Emilia speeseae, Exacum walkeri, E,
pallidum
Ranunculus sagittifolius.
.
Rhododendron
arboreum
Rhododendron
Gaultheria leschenaultii Vaccinium leschenaultii
Berberis
ceylanica
Usnea
barbata
Rhododendron, Gaultheria
Vaccinium
Cinnamomum ovalifolium,
Syzygium revolutum, Neolitsea fuscata, Symplocos elegans
Callophyllum walkeri
Syzygium
rotundifolium, S. umbrosum, Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, Memecylon cuneatum, M.
macrocarpum, M. parvifolium, M. revolutum, Glochidion coriaceum, G. pycnocarpum,
4
29
2. Description of the Property
An endemic
sp. at HPNP. (Left)
Strobilanthes
Arundinaria densifolia, one of the most reduced species of
bamboo, at HPNP (Above)
© Studio Times
© Studio Times

Actinodaphne ambigua, Sarcococca zeylanica, Rhododendron arboreum, Arundinaria
floribunda, A. walkeriana, Symplocos cochinchinensis, S. bractealis, Elaeocarpus
montanus, Vaccinium leschenaultii,
Litsea ovalifolia, Neolitsea fuscata
Eurya
chinensis
Strobilanthes.
Strobilanthes
Aponogeton jacobsenii
Isolepis fluitans,
Utricularia
Laurembergia coccinea, Coelachne
.
.
Arundinaria densifolia
Juncus prismatocarpus
Garnotia exaristata,
Dennstaedtia scabra,
Drosera peltata
D. burmannii
Lycopodium carolinianum,
Eulalia phaeothrix
Eriocaulon
Sphagnum
zeylanicum, Lycopodium carolinianum, L. wightianum
Alchemilla indica
Sphagnum zeylanicum
Dipsacus walkeri
and
.
In the undergrowth are several species of
These species are gregarious and
they flower once in 10-13 years after which the plants die.
is one of the
largest genera in the flora of Sri Lanka and one of the most interesting. Of the 30 species
that have been recognized, 26 are endemic. Many of these species are confined to the
montane area and they are prominent in the undergrowth of the montane and submontane
forests (particulary at the time of flowering) in all three constituents of the property.
Although there are close floristic affinities between the upper montane rain forests of Sri
Lanka and those of South India, about 50 per cent of woody species identified at Horton
Plains are endemic to Sri Lanka, 32% are shared with South India and only the remaining
18% are widely distributed in South-east Asia.
In the slow-flowing streams and water pools of Horton Plains, aquatic macrophytes like
, the sedge
bladderwort
sp. and other
species including
spp are found On the banks of
these streams the dwarf bamboo
forming dense thickets appears to
be spreading along the lower slopes of the grassland. This species is reputed to be one of the
most reduced species of this genus. In water-logged depressions and swampy areas, the
rush
, the grass
the fern
the carnivorous plants
and
, and
and species of
are found.
Among the threatened species found in these grasslands are the peat moss
and
.
The
endemics
and
, each the sole representative of its
family in Sri Lanka, are restricted to a very few localities in Horton Plains and are
considered as endangered (Weerasingha & Wijesundera 2005).
The montane floras of Horton Plains, Peak Wilderness and the Knuckles region are
remarkably different from those of SE Asia in the conspicuous absence of Fagaceae whose
centre of diversity is in the Himalayas. The montane flora of the three constituents of the
nominated property and those of the Western Ghats of southern India are of considerable
regional biogeographic and evolutionary significance as evident from their floral affinities
and disjunct distributions.
No. of species
No. endemic
% endemic
No. nationally
threatened
No. epiphytic
43
18
42
25
22
(Sources of information: Fernando 2005, Dassanayake & Fosberg 1981)
Table 2.5 Orchid species in HPNP
No. of species
Endemic species
% endemic
Globally threatened species
192
79
41
14
Table 2.4: Data on mainly woody plant species in HPNP
(Sources of information: Balasubramaniam et al. 1993, Bambaradeniya & Ekanayake 2003,
Jayasuriya et al. 1993, Greller et al. 1987, Gunatilleke et al. 1996, IUCN & WCMC 1997, DWLC
2007. For species lists see Appendix 1)
30
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

?
Fauna
The many streams in HPNP provide habitats for several rare and endemic wetland fauna
among the invertebrates.
Though lower than KCF and PWPA in terms faunal species diversity, HPNP supports
many interesting species of animals, some of which are confined entirely to Sri Lanka's
montane region. What is of special interest is that in some faunal groups endemicity is
higher than in the other two constituent areas of the property. These are the amphibians
(91%), reptiles (89%) and mammals (39%).
Data on faunal diversity in the different groups are still incomplete despite the recently
concluded baseline biodiversity assessment which included HPNP as one of the areas
covered. The current information on the vertebrates is that Horton Plains contains at least
45 families, 101 genera and 126 species. The data are summarised in Table 2.6.
Of the fish fauna, the rainbow trout (
), introduced during colonial times, is
the only species found in the waters of Horton Plains. It is possible that the trout had
Salmo gardineri
31
2. Description of the Property
The globally threatened endemic freshwater shrimp
confined to
areas in and around Horton Plains
Lancaris singhalensis
© Wildlife Heritage Trust

competed strongly as an invasive species to the detriment of the indigenous fish fauna
(Bambaradeniya and Ranawana 1998). Nonetheless, the streams and other wetlands
within HPNP provide critical habitats for endemic and threatened species of freshwater
invertebrates, some of which have very limited geographical ranges and very specialised
habitat requirements. For example, the globally threatened endemic freshwater shrimp
has been found only in two locations, one in HPNP and the other
some kilometres away (Cai and Bahir 2005).
Eleven species of amphibians have been recorded at HPNP, and all but one are endemic.
Among these,
is found only in HPNP and its immediate environs at altitudes
between 1890 and 2135 m.
is found at Horton Plains but not at
PWPA and KCF.
HPNP has only nine species of reptiles but they are from five families and eight genera,
with seven genera being represented by one species each. Eight of the nine species are
endemic. Five of the endemic species are from relict endemic genera; they are the two
agamids
and
, the skink
, and the colubrid snakes
Boie's roughside) and
(Common roughside).
in HPNP and
in KCF are clear cases of allopatric speciation.
Lancaris singhalensis
Philautus alto
Philautus frankenbergi
Ceratophora stoddartii
Cophotis ceylanica
Lankascincus
taprobanensis
Aspidura brachyorrhos (
Aspidura trachyprocta
Ceratophora stoddartii
C.
tennenti
Families Genera Species Endemics
% endemic Globally
threatened
species
Freshwater fishes*
-
-
-
-
-
Amphibians
2
5
11
10
91
10
Reptiles
5
8
9
8
89
-
Birds**
24
66
78
14
18
3
Mammals
14
22
28
11
39
10
Total
45
101
126
43
34
23
Table 2.6: Data on vertebrate species in HPNP
* excluding introduced species; ** including 4 winter visitors
32
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
Boie's roughside
( Left) and the common roughside
from a relict endemic reptile genus
(Aspidura brachyorrhos)
(Aspidura
trachyprocta)
.
(A brachyorrhos
A, trachyprocta
is also found at KCF while
is found at all three nominated sites)
© Anslem de Silva
© Anslem de Silva

The variety of site conditions in HPNP provides critical habitats for several endemic and
endangered birds. Overall, HPNP has 78 species of birds (representing 24 families and 66
genera) of which 14 species (18%) are endemic. This is also the prime site for the endemic
and globally threatened
(Arrenga). A further 13 species of endemic
birds have been observed at Horton Plains, including the globally threatened
(Sri Lanka Wood Pigeon) and
(Sri Lanka Blue Magpie).
The highland habitats of
H P N P
a s s u m e
considerable importance
f o r c o n s e r v a t i o n o f
m a m m a l i a n
f a u n a ,
particularly those adapted
to the upper elevations of
the central highlands.
HPNP has 28 species of
m a m m a l s , f r o m 1 4
families and 22 genera, of
which 11 (39%) are
e n d e m i c . H P N P i s
t h e r e f o r e
a
v i t a l
component of the central
highlands for conserving
the species of mammalian
fauna characteristic of the
montane habitats.
HPNP provides key
habitats for the endemic shrews
and
that are
considered globally threatened.
is not found at the other two
constituent parts of the nominated property. HPNP also has one other globally threatened
indigenous shrew,
from a monotypic genus restricted to Sri Lanka
and southern India (Wijesinghe & Goonatilake 2005 This park has also several globally
threatened rodent species including the giant squirrel
and the critically
endangered and endemic
(Nelu rat).
Myiophoneus blighi
Columba
torringtoni
Urocissa ornata
Suncus montanus
S. fellows-gordoni
Suncus fellows-gordoni
Feroculus feroculus,
).
Ratufa macroura
Rattus montanus
33
2. Description of the Property
The montane sub-species of the globally threatened and endemic
toque monkey
is distinct from the subspecies in the
wet lowlands and the dry zone
(Macaca sinica)
© Studio Times
© Studio Times
Two endemic and globally threatened birds: Sri Lanka whistling thrush
best seen
at HPNP ( left) and the Sri Lanka white-eye
found at all three sites.
(Myophonus blighi)
(Zosterops ceylonensis)
© Studio Times
© Rahula Perera

The montane subspecies of
three primate species are also
found here. They are the rare
,
and the long
f u r r e d
b e a r
m o n k e y
The two monkey
species are endemic and
HPNP comprises the main
refuge of the bear monkey, the
morphologically distinct
montane sub-species of the
globally threatened
.
Among the carnivores at this site are the rusty-spotted cat (
)
fishing cat (
), leopard (
) and otter (
).
Horton Plains is an important habitat of the
sambur (
). The grassland is
the animal's main feeding ground, and it
retires to the forest patches during the day.
The largest carnivore and top predator at
this site is the leopard. While no conclusive
count has been made it is estimated that
there are about 10-15 animals which range
into HPNP (DWLC 1999b).
According to the IUCN Red List of 2006,
HPNP harbours a total of 23 globally
threatened vertebrate species, of which 20
are endemic to Sri Lanka. The globally
threatened species include ten endemic amphibian species, three species of endemic birds
and 10 species of mammals (of which six are endemic)
Among the globally threatened amphibians at HPNP are the ranid shrub frogs
,
and
which are not
found in PWPA and KCF.
The globally threatened small mammals include: three shrews,
and
and two rodents,
and the giant
squirrel (
) Other globally threatened species are two felids, the rusty-
spotted cat (
) and the fishing cat (
), and
two primates, the purple-faced langur (
) and the toque macaque
(
).
The rare Horton Plains slender loris of Sri Lanka,
has
been recognized as one of the 25 most endangered primate taxa in the world (Mittermier et
al. 2005)
L o r i s
t a r d i g r a d u s
nycticeboides Macaca sinica
opisthomelas,
S e m n o p i t h e c u s v e t u l u s
monticola.
S. vetulus
Prionailurus rubiginosus ,
Prionailurus viverrinus
Panthera pardus
Lutra lutra
Cervus unicolor
Philautus
femoralis, P. microtympanum, P. schmarda P. alto
P. frankenbergi
Feroculus feroculus,
Suncus fellows-gordoni
S. montanus,
Rattus montanus
Ratufa macrura .
Prionailurus rubiginosus
Prionailurus viverrinus
Semnopithecus vetulus
Macaca sinica
Loris tardigradus nycticeboides,
.
34
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
Sambur
pasturing in the
grasslands at HPNP
(Cervus unicolor)
© Studio Times
Fejervarya greeniA globally threatened
species of frog at HPNP (also found at PWPA)
© Anslem de Silva

KCF
Flora
?
Because of its remoteness and extremely rugged and precipitous terrain, the Knuckles
range of mountains remained largely unexplored until recent times. Latterly, however,
several researchers, particularly zoologists, have faced up to the physical challenges in
order to study the interesting
biota of this region. Though
having had a common geological
origin as the Central Massif, the
Knuckles Massif has been
isolated from it for thousands of
years by the relatively low-lying
Kandy Plateau and Dumbara
valley. Hence the biota, while
showing many similarities with
those of the main block of central
h i g h l a n d s , a l s o e x h i b i t
interesting differences brought
about by its long period of
isolation.
Referring to the Knuckles
mountain range, Pethiyagoda
(2005a) states as follows: “The
remote, misty peaks of Sri
Lanka's Knuckles range, in
addition to offering one of the
island's most scenic landscapes,
is the habitat of a rich and unique
biota”. Within the limited area
covered by the Knuckles range,
there occurs a variety of different
habitats based on the altitude,
rainfall, degree of exposure,
terrain, etc. The montane
rainforest is by far the most
interesting and ecologically
important formation in the KCF.
It covers an area of 6700 ha and extends down to an elevation of 1060-1370 m, at which
point, on the western flanks, tea plantations had been raised. Wet montane grasslands are
also seen in some parts of this zone (about 1000 ha), mainly in the Lakegala area. With the
expansion of the area of KCF, it now extends down the eastern slopes of the range in the
northeast trending arm to a lowland elevation of 200 m. This section of KCF shows a
gradation of vegetation types from the montane to the intermediate and the lowland moist
monsoon (semi evergreen) forest formations.
The montane and submontane forests of KCF show similar physiognomic features to the
montane and submontane rain forests of the Central Massif. In the submontane areas the
trees are around 15 m in height, reducing progressively with increase in altitude to about 5
m at the summit. The boles and branches are gnarled and twisted and the leaves small,
Aerial view of the forest canopy at KCF (above)
and a grassland area within the KCF at Pitawela Pathana
35
2. Description of the Property
© Jinie Dela
© Suranjan Fernando

tough and coriaceous. Though many of the species in the KCF are also found in PWPA, the
associations of dominant species are different. The dominant tree species characteristic of
the wetter areas on the western, southern and southeastern faces of the range are
spp., mainly
spp.,
,
and
spp.,
a n d
.
, a characteristic tree
in PWPA, is also found in
KCF especially in the south
and southeast of the range.
The understory consists
largely of
with occasional tree
ferns. Epiphytes, mostly
epiphytic orchids, and
mosses are plentiful on the
boles of the trees, and the
ground flora includes ferns
and mosses (De Rosayro
1 9 5 8 ) . T h e s u b c a n o p y
species include
and
.
A common understory shrub species is
, belonging to the endemic
subfamily Hortonoidae.
Greller & Balasubramaniam (1980) noted the presence of forest communities dominated
by
and
spp. in what would be the
submontane zone of Knuckles. These species occurred in local combinations related to the
site conditions.
A remarkable feature of the flora of Knuckles is the absence of any of the
species that are seen dominating the canopy in some localities of PWPA and the
occurrence of just a single species of this genus,
not found elsewhere in the island
and extremely rare even in Knuckles (Green & Jayasuriya 1996).
In the somewhat drier south and southeast slopes, at high elevations, the same basic forest
type occurs with some variations in species composition. This area is in the rain shadow of
the southwest monsoon, but yet the overall annual rainfall is moderate. It falls into the
montane intermediate zone (i.e. intermediate between wet and dry). Further down the
northeastern slope, in small sections of the KCF, drier conditions prevail and the
vegetation is of the lowland, monsoon type. The characteristic species here are
,
,
,
,
,
,
and
. The
shrub species of the undergrowth include
,
and
.
Hence, although the predominant ecosystem that characterizes the KCF is the montane
and submontane rainforest, the fact that this mountain massif covers but a small area of the
Syzygium
S. micranthum, Gordonia
Eleocarpus glandulifer
Homalium
ceylanicum, Litsea
Neolitsea
Mastixia
t e t r a n d r a
B h e s a
ceylanica
Calophyllum
walkeri
Agrostistachys
coriacea
Pittosporum ceylanicum, Actinodaphne stenophylla
Scolopia pusilla
Hortonia floribunda
Aglaea apiocarpa, Bhesa ceylanica, Cullenia rosayroana, Elaeocarpus glandulifer,
Myristica dactyloides, Dysoxylum championii
Syzygium
Stemonoporus
S. affinis,
Filicium
decipiens Melia azedarach Semecarpus nigro-viridis Dimocarpus longan Vitex
altissima Mangifera zeylanica Calophyllum tomentosum
Nothopegia beddomei
Memecylon umbellatum Glycosmis mauritiana
Ardisia missionis
36
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
The flower and leaf of the extremely rare endemic
, confined entirely to the KCF
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə