Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə6/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   24

Stemonoporus
affinis
Photo:S Balasubramanium © UoP

country and the KCF extends down to an elevation of 200 m on its eastern flanks, there
occurs a transition in ecosystem types from montane rainforest to the dry, lowland
monsoon forest.
Other physiognomically distinct forest formations occurring in the wet montane area are:
low forest, elfin forest, and pygmy forest, three formations characterized by a progressive
diminution in the height of the canopy. The
formation, not found elsewhere in
such an extensive area as found here, is essentially a much reduced form of the montane
forest with height growth hardly exceeding 10 15 m. The dominants are
,
and
. In the
understory
is frequent, with occasional
and
low forest
-
Calophyllum
walkeri, C. trapezifolium Eugenia cotinifolia
Syzygium sclerophyllum
Garcinia echinocarpa
Litsea longifolia
Very low stature forest at Gombaniya within the KCF
Impatiens truncata
Impatiens appendiulata
(Left) and
at KCF
37
2. Description of the Property
© Suranjan Fernando
© Suranjan Fernando
© Suranjan Fernando

Agrostistachys coriacea Memecylon
Macaranga digyna
Elfin forest
Garcinia echinocarpa
Agristostachys coriacia Calophyllum trapezifolium
Eugenia thwaitesii
Arundinaria scandens
Hedyotis rhinophylla
H. obscura
Strobilanthes
S. sexennis
Impatiens
Pygmy forest
Syzygium
Eugenia
S. fergusoni
E. cotinifolia
in situ
Stemonoporus affinis
Dipcadi montanum, Brachystelma lankana, Drosera burmanii, D. peltata
.
spp and
are common associates
in the understory.
The
is confined to very narrow limits within the altitudinal range 1430-1520 m.
This is a single storeyed forest with very restricted height growth, generally below 6m in
height. There is an intimate mixture of two tree species,
and
.
and
are the only
other tree species of note which occur in this formation. The trees are much branched and
abbreviated specimens of the same species also common in the high and low forest
formations. The bamboo
and low shrubs
and
are common species in the forest undergrowth. The most striking species in the
undergrowth is
spp. (the most common being
) in association with
sp. (Werner 1982).
The
is more stunted than the Elfin forest; it is confined to one particular
location at an altitude of 1520-1580 m on the Selvakanda plateau occurring at a ridge top. It
covers a very small area of around 40 ha. The formation represents a most unusual and
unique form of tropical broadleaved tree vegetation dwarfed to an extreme degree, with the
tree species not much more than a metre in height. The form is very likely an adaptation to
the continuous exposure to winds of gale force. The genera
and
found
elsewhere in the montane forest are represented here by
and
.
Several of the other species found in the montane forest are also found here but in a very
stunted form. The naming and description of the dwarf forest types are based on the results
of an expedition into the Knuckles region by a team of scientists (De Rosayro 1958).
KCF, covering but a tiny fraction of the island's land area, harbours over 15% of the
endemic flowering plants, and the genetic diversity of these and other indigenous species
makes this an important area for
conservation. A total of 1033 species of flowering
plants belonging to 141 families have been recorded from KCF, and of this number, 160 are
endemic (Bambaradeniya & Ekanayake 2003). In a survey restricted to two locations in
the montane section, Ratnayake (2005) recorded 379 species of plants, of which 116 (i.e.
>30%) are endemic. Among the species recorded there were 21 of orchids.
A note about one of the rarest species found only in Knuckles is not inappropriate here. “It
didn't take Bala (reference to Dr Balasubramanian) long to show us two specimens of only
a handful known to him of
, one of the island's rarest trees” (Green &
Jayasuriya 1996). This observation was made ten years ago, and even at that time Dr
Balasubramaniam had passed away. Regretably, today, the field staff at Knuckles are
unable to locate or even identify this species. Every effort will be made to locate some trees
of this species and give them special protection while indicating their uniqueness by
placing explanatory boards at each location.
Throughout the KCF there occur patches of open areas with mainly a grassland cover. Rare
and endangered species of other herbaceous plants are found among the grasses. These
include
and
No. of species
Endemic species
% endemic
Globally threatened
species
450
151
34
71
Table 2.7: Data on woody plant species in KCF
(Sources of information: Balasubramaniam et al. 1993, Bambaradeniya & Ekanayake 2003,
Jayasuriya et al. 1993, Greller et al. 1987, Gunatilleke et al. 1996, IUCN & WCMC 1997, DWLC
2007. For species lists see Appendix 1)
38
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Selaginella wightii.
Although the focus of attention in determining the boundary of what was to be the
Knuckles Conservation Forest was the need to conserve the montane and submontane
ecosystems because of their uniqueness and exceptional biological features, the decision to
also include the patches of forest that occurred at lower elevations led to the boundary
encompassing intervening non forest areas. The boundary now extends in a northeasterly
direction to lowland areas down to elevations of around 200 m. (For further clarification,
see section on physiography).
The lower plants have been very inadequately studied in KCF as well as elsewhere in the
country. Reference must, however, be made to the remarkable richness of pteridophytes
discovered during a single scientific expedition by a group of scientists lasting several days
in the Knuckles forest. The botanist Professor Abeywickrama (1964) sampling only on
either side of a 35-mile long trek into the forest has listed 99 species of pteridophytes.
.
Table 2.8 Orchid species in KCF
Sources of information: Fernando 2005, Dassanayake & Fosberg 1981)
No. of species
No. endemic
% endemic
No. nationally
threatened
No. epiphytic
83
35
42
55
22
39
2. Description of the Property
Endemic epiphytic orchids at KCF:
and
Bulbophyllum wightii,
Robiquetia virescens
Trichoglottis tenera
( far left )
© Suranjan Fernando
© Suranjan Fernando
© I A U N Gunatilleke

These included one species of
, four species of
, four species of
and an amazing 90 species of ferns. The vast majority of these plants were
found at the montane and submontane elevations in the forest.
The wide ranging climate, the altitudinal variation and the heavily dissected terrain
provide the basis for a high level of habitat partitioning in KCF. This has resulted in an
exceptionally high faunal diversity relative to other Sri Lankan forests. Of all the forests
Psilotum
Lycopodium
Selaginella,
?
Fauna
Table 2.9: Faunal diversity among the vertebrates in KCF
* not including introduced species; ** including 11 winter visitors and one status
unknown (Sources: Bambaradeniya & Ekanayaka 2003, De Silva 2006, IUCN 1994,
IUCN & WCMC 1997, Manamendra-Arachchi et al. 2006, Wijesinghe & Goonatilake
Families Genera Species
Endemics
%
endemicity
Globally
threatened
species
Freshwater
fishes*
8
15
24
11
46
2
Amphibians
4
14
28
18
64
10
Reptiles
14
48
85
43
51
2
Birds**
46
121
160
19
12
5
Mammals
20
33
41
8
20
9
Total
92
231
338
99
29
28
40
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
Puntius martenstyni, a globally threatened endemic with high habitat specificity
© Ruchira Somaweera

surveyed in the National Conservation Review (281 in total), KCF stands out as the richest
in terms of faunal taxa (IUCN & WCMC 1997).
There are 92 vertebrate families, 231 genera and 338 species represented in the KCF The
338 species include those acclimatised to the upper montane tropical wet evergreen forests
or cloud forests, the wet sub-montane forests, dry sclerophyllous sub-montane forests,
semi-evergreen forests of the lower elevations, riverine forests and patana grasslands
(Bambaradeniya & Ekanayaka 2003, IUCN 1994). The data are presented in Table 2.9
Many streams and tributaries of the Mahaweli Ganga originate and flow through the
Knuckles and these water bodies are the habitats of a remarkably diverse wetland fauna,
which includes 24 species of indigenous freshwater fishes, of which 11 (46%) are endemic.
Some endemic fish species such as
and
are entirely
confined to the Knuckles region.
, a globally threatened endemic
Garra phillipsi
Puntius srilankensis
Puntius martenstyni
41
2. Description of the Property
The endemic and
globally
threatened
a
freshwater crab
limited to less
than 1 km of
slow-flowing
streams in the
KCF
Ceylonthelpusa
durrelli:
2
The Endangered
Kelaart's dwarf
toad
from
an endemic
genus, found at
KCF and PWPA
(Adenomus
kelaartii)
© Ruchira Somaweera
© Pradeep Samarawickrama

species with high habitat specificity, is restricted to the northern part of the Knuckles range
and is found only in the headwaters of a river located within this forest (Pethiyagoda
1998). The Knuckles Forest has been recognized as a clearly defined ichthyofaunal
province (Pethiyagoda 1991).
Five species of freshwater crabs in an endemic genus
(
,
and
) are restricted to the Knuckles mountains.
is found only at two locations in the KCF (Bahir and Ng, 2005).
is restricted
to a range of about 1 km at an altitude of 1000 m in KCF in the vicinity of Corbett's Gap.
Besides these, there are two other endemic fresh water crab species of the genus
which are restricted to the Knuckles mountains (Bahir and Ng 2005).
The particularly rich herpetefauna include 28 amphibians of which 64% are endemic to
Sri Lanka. The recent discovery of five new species of amphibians from within an area of
10 km suggests that this area is a paradise for amphibians (Manamendra Arachchi &
Pethiyagoda 2005). It is also significant that among the amphibian fauna at KCF are
representatives of three endemic genera:
(represented at this site by
),
(represented by
from a monotypic genus) and
(represented by
).
Eighty-five species of reptiles have been recorded at KCF of which 51% are endemic. Out
of the 11 relict reptile genera in the island, KCF has three agamid genera (
three saurian genera (
two colubrid genera (
) and one uropeltid genus (
)
(De Silva 2006). Fifteen species from these endemic genera are found at KCF. Some of the
herpetefauna that are entirely restricted to KCF are as follows:
Ceylonthelphusa C. sanguinea C.
callista, C. cavatrix, C durelli
C. diva
C.
diva
C. durelli
Mahatha
Nannophrys
N.
marmorata
Lankanectes
L. corrugata
Adenomes
A. Kelaartii
Ceratophora,
Cophotis, Lyriocephalus),
Chalcidoseps, Lankascincus, Nessia),
Aspidura, Haplocercus
Pseudotyphlops
2
2
Nannophrys marmorta, a habitat specialist frog from an endemic genus is
Restricted to this forest where it is found under small rock boulders and on rock
surfaces and in crevices over which there is a constant flow of water (Nizam et al.
2005).
The specific epithet refers to
which is the local name for the Knuckles region
5
Dumbara
42
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
© Anslem de Silva
© Ruchira Somaweera
The lyre head lizard
from an endemic genus found at
KCF and PWPA (left) and the endemic green pit viper
found at KCF and PWPA (right)
Lyriocephalus scutatus
Trimeresurus trigonocephalus

?
?
?
?
?
KCF contains 10 shrub frogs of the genus
, of which at least five are found
only in KCF; several endemic species of this genus (
and
have very limited ranges within
this forest.
The endemic
(leaf-nosed lizard), considered a relict agamid
from an endemic genus, is restricted to the Knuckles Massif. Healthy populations
of this species occur at KCF (De Silva et al. 2005d) and it is the dominant agamid in
the Knuckles where it can be seen at elevations of up to 1700 m (
.)
, an endemic gecko species, is mainly confined to the Knuckles
forest where it ranges from the lower elevations to the montane cloud forests and is
even seen in human habitations (Goonewardene et al. 2006).
an endemic skink species from a monotypic
geographically relict genus, is confined to the lower elevations of the KCF forest.
(Goonewardene et al. 2006).
The main populations of
, an endemic agamid, are found in the
Knuckles region; the other populations occur at Sinharaja another World Heritage
Site (De Silva et al. 2005e, Goonewardene et al. 2006).
KCF contains 41 species of mammals and 160 species of birds. Among the mammals are:
the endemic Purple-faced monkey (
and the endemic toque
macaque (
, both of which are represented at this site by the dry zone
subspecies (Phillips 1981); the grey slender loris (
); four felids
including the leopard (
); the endemic golden palm cat (
); the otter (
); two species of deer (
the spotted deer, and
Philautus
P. macropus, P. fulvus, P.
hoffmani, P. mooereorum, P. steineri
P. stuarti)
Ceratophora tennentii
ibid
Cyrtodactylus soba
Chalcidoseps thwaitesii,
Calotes liocephalus
Semnopithecus vetulus)
Macaca sinica)
Loris lydekkerianus
Panthera pardus
Paradoxurus
zeylonensis
Lutra lutra
Axis axis,
.
Individuals from populations in KCF of the endemic genus
, hitherto
regarded as monotypic, were subject to investigation recently and were found to
belong to a species distinct from
which is found in the other two
constituent sites of the property. The species has been named
(Manamendra-Arachchi et al. 2006). It is a rare species and found only in the
Knuckles Massif whereas
is found in the Central Massif and is more
widespread. This distribution is suggestive of allopatric radiation.
?
Cophotis
Cophotis ceylanica
Cophotis dumbarae
C. ceylanica
5
43
2. Description of the Property
Two felids at KC
the globally threatened rusty-spotted cat
) also
found at HPNP, and the jungle cat
) also found at PWPA.
F:
(Prionailurus rubiginosus
(Felis chaus
© Ruchira Somaweera
© Ruchira Somaweera

Muntiacus muntjak
Cervus unicolor
Elephas
maximus)
Ratnadvipia,
Ravana, Acavus, Oligospira
Aulopoma
Acarvus
Troides darsius
Elymnias singala
Labeo fisheri
Puntius martenstyni
Nannophrys marmorata
Philautus macropus,
Philautus
Calotes liolepis
Ceratophora tennentii,
Columba torringtoni
Sturnus albofrontatus
Urocissa ornata
Myiophoneus blighi
Solisorex pearsoni
Feroculus feroculus
Suncus
montanus
Srilankamys ohiensis
Ratufa macroura
, the barking deer); and sambur (
). Elephants (
are rare in the KCF due to hunting during colonial times, but herds do continue
to range through some peripheral areas of the KCF with natural open woodland (e.g.
Pitawela patana) due to its proximity to the Wasgamuwa National Park (Goonewardene et
al. 2006).
In one of the better investigated invertebrate groups, the mollusca, diversity has been
found to be exceptionally high at this site. Fifty species of land snails have been recorded
from the Knuckles region, of which 78% are endemic. The richest habitats for molluscs at
KCF are the montane forests, followed by the sub-montane forests and intermediate zone
forests (Ranawana 2006). Sri Lanka has five endemic mollusc genera (
and
). All but one (
) have been recorded
within the Knuckles forest (Ranawana 2006).
The butterfly fauna at KCF is also notable, with 60 species recorded to date, including the
two endemic species
(Ceylon birdwing) and
(Ceylon
Palmfly) (Bambaradeniya and Ekanayake 2003).
KCF harbours 28 species of globally threatened vertebrates listed in the 2006 IUCN Red
List. These include the endemic and globally threatened
(mountain labeo)
and
(Martyenstyn's barb);
(Kirthisinghe's
rock frog), a relict species listed as critically endangered;
from a
relict genus and not recorded in the other two nominated areas and listed as critically
endangered; and a further 11 endemic
species of evolutionary significance listed
as globally threatened.
Among the reptiles, the agamid lizards
and
the
latter restricted to the Knuckles Forest, are listed as globally threatened.
The avifauna at KCF includes five globally threatened birds, of which four are endemics.
They are
(Sri Lanka Wood Pigeon),
(Sri Lanka
White-faced Starling),
(Sri Lanka Blue Magpie) and
(Arrenga). Of the nine globally threatened mammals at KCF, five are small mammals.
These include the endemic shrew
(Pearson's long-clawed shrew from
an endemic genus),
(Kelaart's long-clawed shrew) and
(Sri Lanka highland shrew) and the rodents
(Sri Lanka
bicoloured rat from an endemic genus) and
(the giant squirrel). Among
44
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
The globally threatened and endemic Sri Lanka blue magpie
found at all three nominated sites (left),
(Urocissa ornata)
the
critically endangered endemic shrub frog
found at KCF (middle), and the endangered agamid lizard
found at KCF and PWPA (right)
Philautus macropus
Calotes
liolepis
© Ruchira Somaweera
© Ruchira Somaweera
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
pace
ra space sk

the other globally threatened mammals at KCF are two primates (
and
and the elephant (
)
To understand the significance of
Adam's Peak (or
, meaning
holy footprint in Sinhala) in the
context of Sri Lanka's history it is
necessary to go back to c. 400 BC and
to the island's dry zone where the
rulers began to harness water
resources to provide what we in
today's terminology would call
sustainable living for the people. This
trend developed some centuries later
into the famed hydraulic civilization
referred to as “an epic saga of man's
experience in harnessing water
resources for his sustenance and well-
being” (Toynbee 1960, Needham
1971). Thousands of reservoirs for the
storage of water (referred to as tanks)
were built everywhere in the dry zone
t h r o u g h
s e v e r a l
c e n t u r i e s
(Abeywickrama 1956). In Sri Lanka's
cultural development over the past
millennia, while being concerned with
managing natural resources for
sustainable living, successive kings
also placed great emphasis on
promoting religious values and
practices. These were the hallmarks of
the march of Sri Lanka's civilization through the ages. This is seen in the centuries-old
religious monuments that are much in evidence today in Anuradhapura, Polonnuwara,
Dambulla and many other places in the dry zone. It is in this context that the Peak
Wilderness Protected Area should be recognized as a
of the highest
importance. The history of Adam's Peak and its association with the evolving culture and
civilization of Sri Lanka dates back more than two millennia.
As recorded in the
(Anon. 543 BC-1758 AD), Sri Lanka's great chronicle
Semnopithecus vetulus
Macaca sinica)
Elephas maximus .
Sripada
cultural heritage
Mahawamsa
2. b History and Development
2. b. 1 Cultural Features
PWPA
6
Sri Lanka's great chronicle, the
(see Anon. 545 BC-758 AD), is in two parts arranged
chrononogically; the second part is referred to as the
See Anon. 545 BC 1758 AD.
Mahawamsa
Chulawamsa.
45
2. Description of the Property
Present day pilgrims who climb Adam's Peak provide a
link with centuries old traditions
© Studio Times

(translation by Wilhelm Geiger 1950), and further elaborated in the writings of Fa Hien,
the Chinese Buddhist monk who traveled in Sri Lanka and India from 392 to 414 AD
(translated by James Legge 1886), the Buddha is believed to have visited Sri Lanka, not
physically, but by the projection of his image through supernatural power during his
lifetime around 550 BC. According to the latter document, he (the Buddha) “planted one
foot at the north of the royal city (i.e. Anuradhapura) and the other at the top of the
mountain (i.e.
)”.
Although held sacred and venerated by the people for several centuries earlier, it was in the
11 century AD that for the first time the reigning monarch, King Vijayabahu I (1055-1110
AD), ventured into the remote thickly forested and hostile country to climb the holy
mountain and worship at Siripada. King Nissankamalla (1187-1196) climbed the peak
with his army, and this is recorded in a rock inscription at the peak. King Panditha
Parakrama Bahu I (1236-1271 AD) went on pilgrimage to the peak, and his experience
prompted him to direct his chief minister to make the journey less arduous for the pilgrims.
This is recorded in the
That the directive was given effect to is evident from
the comment made by Marco Polo in the 13th century (1293) (Tennent 1859, Hulugalle
1965) that chains were provided to assist the pilgrims in their ascent. Ibn Batuta, the 14
century Arab traveller who visited the peak refers to a grotto at the foot of the peak. One of
several routes could be used to climb the mountain, and wayside rests, called
,
have been erected at different points.
At middle elevations on the climb to the peak are found caves with the drip-ledge and
Brahmi inscriptions dating back to the second century BC. These are believed to have
housed forest-dwelling monks.
An earlier name (prior to the arrival of Buddhism to the island c. 250 BC) given to this
mountain was
after the diety Saman (possibly a deified local chieftan).
The clouds of yellow butterflies that converge on the mountain for a short time each year
are called “samanalayo”.
Over the centuries, until the present time, the Adam's Peak mountain grew in importance as
a place of veneration steeped in cultural and traditional practices. It indeed bears unique
testimony to a cultural tradition and civilization dating back many centuries and still
living. At the present time it is estimated that two million people, mainly pilgrims, not
only Buddhists but also Hindus and Muslims, visit the peak annually. The pilgrim season
is December to May.
There are numerous religious cum cultural practices that have evolved over the ages
associated with pilgrimages to the peak, some associated with the primodial urge of
mankind to worship deities. For example, before the commencement of the pilgrim season
ceremonies are held at
in Ratnapura to invoke blessings of the
deity Saman on the pilgrims that come in their thousands during the season.
Although held in great veneration in an almost unbroken chain for over two millenia, there
was a time during the reign of King Magha of Sri Lanka when Buddhist persecution took
place and the monks who used to go on annual pilgrimage to Adam's Peak were forced to
leave the country
and seek refuge in Burma, Thailand and Laos (Codrington
1939). To continue their devotion to the worship of the footprint, they made and took with
them replicas of the footprint and installed them in the temples abroad. As a result, a major
Sripada
Chulawamsa .
ambalama
Samantha kuta,
Sri Sumana Saman devalaya
en masse
th
th
6
46
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

cult of footprint worship developed in Southeast Asia covering all the Theravada Buddhist
centres of the region, a practice that is still carried out in an unbroken tradition since the 13
century AD. Subsequent to the Magha persecutions many of the monks returned to Sri
Lanka bringing back their cultural relics to the temples of Sri Lanka especially to those
surrounding the then capitals of the island, namely, Dambadeniya, Yapahuwa, Gampola,
Kotte and Kandy. Consequently, the cult of
veneration through the use of replicas
spread widely in the country.
The cultural heritage of HPNP is directly linked to its remarkable prehistory.
Archaeological findings of undated geometric microlithic stone artifacts which have been
assigned to the Mesolithic culture in Sri Lanka had been discovered in Horton Plains by
Deraniyagala (1992).
Recently, a series of studies (Premathilake 2003, 2006; Premathilake & Risberg 2003)
using radio carbon dated multiproxy data (pollen, spores, diatoms, phytoliths (siliceous
particles), organic carbon, total carbon, carbon isotopes, mineral magnetic properties,
lithology, and radio carbon dates) from several mires (peat and sediment deposits) in
Horton Plains have provided startling evidence relating to the prehistory of this high
elevation tableland. There is evidence of major environmental changes here during the last
glacial maximum (24,000-18,500 years BP). Studies of pollen and spores show the
existence of xerophytic vegetation (e.g.
), suggestive of harsh semi-arid
conditions during that time. Proxy data suggest that the hunter forage culture of prehistoric
man existed here during that period. There is evidence of the practice of slash and burn and
th
Siripada
Chenopodium
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə