Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə7/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   24

HPNP
7
The cultivated varieties are distinguished from the types occurring wild on the basis of morphological
characters of the pollen grain; the pollen grains of the cultivated varieties are much larger and so are the
pores, and the pore has a protruding lip.
47
2. Description of the Property
Enlarged picture of
multi-proxy records of
the earliest agriculture
at Horton Plains.
:
Avena
.
,
:
:
A
B
C
D
E
Fossil pollen grain
of
sp (oat)
Siliceous micro fossil
(phytolith) of festucoid
type grass (barley),
and
: Bulliform fossil
phytolith (e.g. Oryza
sp.),
Fossil phytolith
of panicoid type grass.
A
C
B
D
E

of grazing in the period following the last glacial maximum.
During the post glacial period, with improved climatic conditions, meaning increasing
humidity, there is evidence of the existence of farming communities during 17,600 -
16,000 years BP when incipient management of the cereal plants oat and barley began and
continued to progress. The wild progenitors of oat and barley,
sp. and
sp.,
would already have been present in Horton Plains before the last glacial maximum. Not
surprisingly, the species
and
sp. (Family
Poaceae, Tribe Aveneae) and
sp. and
sp. (Family Poaceae, Tribe
Triticeae) are found among the vegetation of Horton Plains and the surrounding areas at
the present time.
The first appearance of systematic cultivation in which species of rice (we now recognize
as
,
,
and
) were used occurs in the
period 13,000 8700 years BP when humid conditions prevailed . By then the cultivation
of oat and barley had decreased as evidenced by multiproxy records. With increasing dry
conditions between 8000 and 3600 years BP agricultural land use decreased, after which
the area appears to have been almost deserted.
The current state of Horton Plains as a grassland fringed by montane rainforest could,
indeed, be a legacy of the past when over a period of several millennia this plain had been
subject to clearing, burning and cultivation.
The Knuckles region, an isolated mountain massif in the Kandy and Matale areas, with its
rugged terrain and mist covered forest has been a retreat region throughout the history of
the island. Occasionally the people from other parts of the island are said to have retreated
to this area in the face of invasions, famines and disease.
According to studies carried out by the Department of Archaeology, University of
Peradeniya, the historical, technological and cultural sequence of the human habitat of the
Knuckles range can be listed as follows:
1. Prehistoric period
2. Early Iron Age
3. Precolonial period (i.e. prior to 1505 AD)
Regarding the prehistoric period, several sites have been discovered belonging to the
Mesolithic period, dated at 30,000 years BC. Primary tool types, or microliths, fashioned
out of quartz and chert have been found.
Relating to the Iron Age, drip-ledge caves
from the 2nd century BC to the 1 century
AD have been discovered. This indicates the arrival of Buddhist monks who were in
communication with the village settlements in the lower escarpments.
dated
Avena
Hordeum
Avena sterilis, A. fatua, A. barbata
Helictotrichon
Brachypodium
Hordeum
Oryza eichingeri O. nivara O. rhizomatis
O. rufipogon
-
7
KCF
st
8
Detailed studies on Mesolithic human remains from caves in and around Balangoda and elsewhere in the
island affirm a genetic continuum from
to the more recent
aboriginal
people of Sri Lanka ( Kennedy & Deraniyagala 1989, Kennedy et al. 1987)
Homo sapiens balangodensis
Vedda
48
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

The discovery of silver punch-marked coins from a cave at Uyangamuwa establishes the
long distance trade connectivity this region has had with the north-central plains of the
island and with the outside world. The silver punch-marked coins were of north Indian
origin dating back to the 5 century BC and after. Trading was mainly in minerals like mica,
graphite, quartz, etc. Chert brought in from Knuckles was discovered at the prehistoric
level excavations in the Citadel and Vessagiri sites in the ancient city of Anuradhapura.
This material was brought to the sites for the production of stone tools. Middle historic
levels at the Anuradhapura Jetavana
yielded large blocks of chert brought in from
Knuckles. At least three traditional routes to the Knuckles range have been discovered.
Over the past ten years or so, evidence has come to light of the significance of several caves
discovered in the heart of the Knuckles forest. The evidence points out to the occupation of
these caves by Mesolithic man many thousands of years ago. The KCF is clearly an area
that is ripe for further archaeological research and such work will be promoted while taking
action to conserve the sites that have been found (De Silva et al. 2005b, De Silva et al.
2005c)
Precolonial texts record the occurrence of several
chieftancies in the Knuckles
region and their interaction with the Kandyan kingdom. A series of
settlements have
been identified in this region. The following villages are traditionally associated with
families: Puvakpitiya, Pottatawela Dammentenna, Kahagala, Illukkumbura,
Pitawela, Ettanwela, Rambukoluwa, Narangamuwa, Madumana and Galgedewala.
th
8
dagoba
Vedda
Vedda
Vedda
49
2. Description of the Property
Evidence of an ancient
construction technology in a
village (Meemure) within the KCF
© Studio Times

In addition to the
settlements there were other technological and cultural groups that
inhabited the Knuckles range and depended on the ecosystem for supplying many of their
needs. The Dumbara reed crafts and the Lak (
) painting traditions are examples of
such ancient cultural practices. While of interest in relation to the cultural features of KCF,
some of these pre-colonial settlements fall outside the area now recognized as the KCF but
are within what could be regarded as the buffer zone.
Many rituals and cultural practices had developed in the isolated villages of the Knuckles
region that related to their living and sustenance. These have been described in detail in
section 3.a under the appropriate criterion. Some of the practices involved the use of plant
species for food and medicine based on the experience gained over centuries, so providing
an ideal anthropological laboratory for gaining a better understanding of sustainable living
close to nature.
To understand the exceptional features of the indigenous fauna and flora of Sri Lanka,
particularly those occurring in the wet southwest of the country which includes the central
highlands, one needs to consider the geological evolution of the island. Sri Lanka is a
derivative of the vast southern continent of Gondwanaland that broke up at the end of the
Mesozoic Era. The Deccan Plate rafted northwestwards carrying with it the gondwanic
biota. Sri Lanka separated from the rest of the Deccan Plate during the Miocene Epoch.
While these lateral movements were taking place, upliftment of the land on a massive scale
occurred at different times in the island's geological history with intermittent periods when
strong erosive forces acted on the land eventually resulting in the present topography of the
island. The uplifting would have raised areas of lowland rainforest to higher elevations
exposing them to a much cooler climate. While many genera disappeared completely from
the montane area (e.g. all of the Dipterocarpaceae except for the genus
)
others developed new species adapted to the changed environmental conditions.
The absence of a mountain bridge between Sri Lanka and the neighbouring Indian
peninsula, at any rate in the post-Miocene period, would have prevented the free exchange
of biota between these two areas. Moreover, the broad expanse of seasonally dry lowland
in the northern part of the country and the presence of the mountainous area in the south-
central part would have acted as a double barrier isolating the humid and perhumid
southwest of Sri Lanka biogeograpically. It is not surprising, therefore, that the flora and
fauna of Sri Lanka's wet zone exhibit an extraordinarily high endemicity. Within the wet
zone, the lowland rainforest shows an exceptional richness in biodiversity and a robust
physiognomic structure indicative of perfect adaptation to the prevailing humid and
perhumid conditions. In the montane and submontane zones where the three components
of the nominated property are located many of the genera and families are those of the
lower altitudes indicating common origin, but the structure and physiognomy of the forest
suggest that many species show less than perfect adaptation to the montane climatic
conditions.
The present montane flora could therefore be the relic of what was once a lowland rain
forest, and the form and growth of many of the dominant species show that they have had
to adapt to the harsh climatic conditions of the montane zone. In this context it may be
noted that when exotic species from the temperate regions, such as species of pine and
eucalyptus, are introduced to the montane zone as forest plantations they show vigorous
growth and excellent form and they attain large sizes.
Vedda
laksha
Stemonoporus
2. b. 2
Natural aspects
50
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Historically, the rainforests at all altitudes of the wet zone had remained intact throughout
the many millennia during which the dry zone was developed for agriculture. Although
aspects of biodiversity were not recognized in terms of current knowledge, the need for
preserving natural ecosystems was appreciated even at that time. While reservoirs were
being constructed, the catchment areas were left in their natural condition. Although it
refers to a forest in the dry zone, it would not be out of place to relate an anecdote where as
early as the third century BC, Arahat Mahinda is said to have exhorted King
Devanampiyatissa as he was about to go hunting, in the following words, “O Great King,
the birds of the air and the beasts of the earth have an equal right to live and move in any part
of this land as thou; the land belongs to the people and all other beings and thou art the
guardian of it”. Heeding the words of Arahat Mahinda, the king renounced hunting and
declared the forest of Mihintale, where he had intended to go hunting, as a sanctuary,
perhaps the first of its kind in the world. This incident could be said to have set the tone for
the recognition of the ethic of environmental conservation among the rulers.
Although the movement of the indigenous population to the wet zone had taken place
much earlier, particularly upstream along major rivers and streams, it was after the British
gained control of the island in 1815 that large scale clearing of the montane and
submontane forests took place. These forests were cleared for growing coffee. When the
coffee plantations failed due to the spread of the coffee blight, tea began to be planted and
large areas of montane and submontane rainforest were cleared for this purpose. This trend
in the clearing of high elevation forests was arrested, when consequent to a
recommendation made by the eminent botanist Joseph Hooker, all forest clearing in areas
above the elevation of 5000 ft (1540 m) was banned. The primary concern arose because of
the hydrological importance of these forests which were the sources of all the major rivers
in the country and the damage that would be caused if forest clearing was continued. This
rule was respected until recent times. But in the 1960s, the government decided to clear
some sections of montane forests for raising “seed” potato. Certain sections of the
grasslands in Horton Plains were also used for the same purpose. This trend, however, did
not continue on account of the concerns that were being expressed by environmental
scientists and the public.
There was another trend that resulted in the reduction of the natural forest cover. From the
point of view of timber production, the montane rainforests were considered to be of the
low yield type. Hence, to increase productivity forest plantations were raised in the
montane zone both through afforestation of grasslands as well by clear felling the natural
forests and replanting with timber species. The species used were all exotics, mainly
eucalyptus and pine. Sections of natural forests were also felled for fuelwood production
and the areas reforested with the exotics. The forestation programme was intensified in the
1950s and 1960s, but slowed down thereafter. Later, reforestation of natural forest areas in
the mountainous areas with exotic species was stopped altogether, which was a welcome
move.
Another factor of considerable importance is the constant illicit felling operations that
have gone on throughout several decades. Many of the montane and submontane forests
are situated cheek by jowl with tea plantations and village communities. The local
inhabitants, the villagers and the plantation workers, obtain their small timber and
fuelwood needs from the adjoining natural forests and this has gone on for many decades
causing forest degradation. Encroachment into the forests by villagers, either for
occupation of the land or for extending their small tea allotments too has been a regular
51
2. Description of the Property

occurrence.
Concern for the protection of the natural forests of the wet zone was largely centred on the
value of these forests for conserving soil and water in what are the critical watersheds of
the country. It was in the 1970s that the importance of these forests as a repository of a rich
complement of biodiversity and the refuge of a large number of species not to be found
anywhere else in the world began to be recognized. Conceding to pressure from
environmentalists and the informed public, the government imposed a ban on all forest
clearing and logging (including selective logging) in all the remaining natural forests of
the wet zone. Already by then the natural forests in this area of the country had been
reduced to fragments, many just a few hundred hectares in extent. Although they had been
subject to some degree of selective logging and encroachment, the larger blocks that
remained and were for the most part intact were Kanneliya (lowland tropical rainforest),
now a biosphere reserve; Sinharaja (lowland, mid-elevation and submontane rainforest),
now a World Heritage Site and biosphere reserve); and the Peak Wilderness, together with
Horton Plains and the Knuckles (montane, submontane and midelevation rain forest), now
being nominated for inscription as a World Heritage. The three areas constituting the
nominated property, besides having outstanding natural heritage value as areas where the
rich and endemic biotas of the montane and submontane rainforests have been preserved,
also possess a rich cultural heritage.
A good part of the peak wilderness range, including the area that now forms the Peak
Wilderness Protected Area (PWPA), was declared a sanctuary under the Fauna and Flora
Protection Ordinance (FFPO) in 1940. The Peak Wilderness Sanctuary comprised mainly
state property, but there were also private land lots within the area. The FFPO had been
enacted only three years previously. The Department of Wildlife Conservation had not
been established at that time and the Forest Department was the controlling body for areas
falling under the FFPO. A sanctuary, contrary to what one may be led to believe by the use
of this term, is the least protected of the categories of areas that could be gazetted under the
FFPO. A sanctuary may include private property, and free access is allowed into any part of
a sanctuary. It is surmised that with the enactment of the FFPO, the need to give legal
protection to the peak wilderness area on account of the existence of the sacred peak within
it was recognized. In view of the need to allow free access to pilgrims and the existence of
private land within the area demarcated for declaration as a protected area, the only
feasible option for expeditious implementation was considered to be to declare the area a
sanctuary. The sanctuary included three forest areas that were under the control of the
Forest Department in terms of the Forest Ordinance. They were the Peak Wilderness
Proposed Forest Reserve, the Morahela Forest Reserve and the Walawe Basin Forest
Reserve. The latter two had been declared as forest reserves way back in 1893. Although
they fell within the sanctuary, they continued to remain under the control of the Forest
Department even after the Department of Wild Life Conservation was established in the
1950s and had assumed control of the rest of the sanctuary.
Encroachments into the area, particularly in its southern section, continued even after it
was declared a sanctuary under the FFPO. The low protection status accorded to a
sanctuary would no doubt have served as an incentive for encroachment. The management
plan refers to state land within the parts of the sanctuary supposedly under the control of
the DWLC being given out to villagers by the local representatives of the Government
PWPA
52
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Agent. The dual status of the Sanctuary, with different departments of government (at
times in the past the two departments were under separate ministries) administering it
under powers vested in them by separate ordinances did lead to complications that
militated against the proper management of the area. Making confusion worse confounded
was the district administration assuming some administrative control over the state land in
the DWLC areas of the sanctuary e.g. by allocating land for settlement.
Three management plans (IUCN 1996, DWLC 1999, DWLC 2005) have recommended
various ways in which the problem could be resolved. With the decision to propose the
peak wilderness as a part of a serial property for nomination as a Mixed World Heritage,
the legal and administrative positions of the Peak Wilderness Sanctuary were re-examined
and the following decisions taken:
1. To leave the access routes to the peak, the peak itself, and religious and cultural
sites within the peak wilderness area in the status of a sanctuary (to enable unfettered
access to the peak);
2. To declare the the Peak Wilderness Proposed Reserve, the Morahela Forest
Reserve and the Walawe Basin Forest Reserve as Conservation Forests under the
Forest Ordinance and exclude them from being considered as a part of the sanctuary;
3.
To identify the area within the sanctuary (other than the areas referred to in 1
and 2 above) which is free of large scale encroachments, estates, villages, public
utilities, etc. and declare it as a Nature Reserve under the Fauna and Flora
Protection Ordinance.
Action has now been taken on these lines. The Peak Wilderness Nature Reserve is in 9
blocks, which, together with the conservation forests, form an unbroken chain of natural
forest linking PWPA with HPNP. The legal and administrative position has now been
clearly established, with the Forest Department being in control of the conservation forests
53
2. Description of the Property
A patch of forest dieback at HPNP
© Studio Times

and the Department of Wildlife Conservation in control of the nature reserve and the parts
of the former sanctuary comprising the pilgrim trails and the peak which still remain in the
status of a sanctuary. The PWPA comprises the conservation forests, the nature reserve and
the pilgrim trails and peak.
Horton Plains was declared a National Park under the Fauna and Flora Protection
Ordinance on 16 March 1988 and is under the control of the Department of Wildlife
Conservation. It has an area of 3109 ha; two-thirds of the area was said to consist of
grassland and the rest montane forest (DWLC 1999b). In a recent habitat survey using
satellite imagery, however, the area of grassland turned out to be much less - just about a
third of the total area of the Park (DWLC & MOE 2006).
HPNP has always been considered as a scenic area, visited by adventurous tourists to
enjoy the solitude of the area, to observe the view from World's End, or less often to climb
the peaks bordering the area. In the 1960s, in a drive to increase food production locally,
the government took up sections of Horton Plains for raising seed potato. Fortunately this
activity was stopped after a time and the cultivated area in Horton Plains was allowed to
revert to nature. But there have been some lasting effects. Some new grass species appear
to have been introduced during the period when cultivation took place. The species have
been identified as
,
and
.
is favoured by the sambur for grazing, over the native
.
Tree die-back in Horton Plains was first observed in a field visit following the UNESCO
conference on the Humid Tropics held in Kandy in 1956. Since then the situation has
aggravated and the phenomenon has been observed in other areas of montane forest as
well. In the 2006 survey referred to above 30% of the Horton Plains forest area was seen to
be affected by dieback. Twenty-two species are reported to be affected by the die-back, the
commonest being
and
. Several speculative theories have
been advanced to explain this phenomenon but an acceptable explanation has to await
further investigation.
The popularity of HPNP as a tourist attraction has grown sharply in recent years and the
number of visitors has increased quite considerably. This brings with it problems of
management to prevent site deterioration through over-visitation and practices such as
careless garbage disposal, collection of plants and animal species, etc. Fortunately, the
other dangers to which state land is exposed elsewhere in the country, which are
encroachment and illicit timber felling and firewood collection, are virtually non-existent
here. However, there is a threat from illicit, small scale gem mining, with its attendant
environmental damage, particularly near the Bogawantalawa access route.
The extremely precipitous, many-peaked, and moist laden Knuckles range has at it very
heart the Knuckles Conservation Forest, a component of the nominated property. Within
the range, apart from a small area of 290 ha, called Campbell's Land Forest Reserve (so
declared in 1902), the rest of the area had not been accorded protection status. Mention
must be made, however, of another section of 1850 ha that was designated Dotulugala
proposed reserve, but which had never been declared a reserve. The forested areas of the
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə