Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə8/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   24

HPNP
KCF
Pennisetum glabrum P. clandestinum
Vulpia bromoides P.
glabrum
Chrysopogon zeylanicus
Calophyllum walkeri, Cinnamonum ovalifolium, Symplocos obtusa,
Syzygium rotundifolium
Glochidion pycnocarpum
54
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

range have been under the control of the Forest Department, and the areas other than the
reserve and proposed reserve were under the category “other state forests”.
While being held in awe from a distance, very few have ventured into the area for study and
observation. The first study tour by a team of scientists who trekked into the heart of the
Knuckles was in 1956. Prior to that, explorations had been carried out for mapping the area
in terms of its geology. The 1956 expedition brought out a great deal of scientific
information from areas that had never been subject to such detailed study before (De
Rosayro 1958, Abeywickrama 1964, Cooray 1998). Matters regarding the conservation of
the forest, however, gave no cause for concern at that time.
In the early 1960s permits were issued by the Forest Department to individuals to
underplant limited areas of forest with cardamom (
), a spice crop
which thrives under the shade of the forest canopy. Clearing the undergrowth,
underplanting with cardamom, and subsequent cleaning and weeding operations would
naturally interfere with the regrowth of the natural forest, but so long as the areas given out
for this purpose were strictly limited and the operations confined to these areas, no danger
to the natural forest as a whole was perceived. What happened in practice was completely
different. Clandestine underplanting operations were carried out by the villagers, and the
permit holders themselves expanded their cultivations beyond the set boundaries. Over the
years this trend grew considerably in magnitude and was getting out of hand.
From the early 1980s there was growing concern regarding the importance of the Knuckles
forest from an environmental point of view. While its importance as a repository of rare and
endangered plant and animal species was only just beginning to be recognized, the main
concern at the time was the need to protect the Knuckles range because of its importance as
a source of water to the Mahaveli Ganga. In fact the entire drainage system of the Knuckles
belongs to the Mahaveli Ganga system. That there was good cause for concern was proved
by later studies which showed that cardamom cultivation in the forest caused increased soil
erosion and reduction in the water retention capacity of the soil (Bandaratilleke 1988), and
it also had adverse effects on the natural regeneration of the forest species (Madduma
Bandara 1991).
In 1985 a committee of experts and high level officials was appointed to study and make
recommendations on how a decision that had already been taken by the government for the
conservation of the Knuckles area could be effectively implemented. The committee held
that the entire area above the 3500 ft (1067 m) contour is of critical importance
environmentally and that it should be given legal protection.
In 1987 the government made a request to IUCN - The World Conservation Union to
provide assistance for a project that would lead to the drawing up of a sustainable
management programme for the Knuckles forest areas. The project (called Knuckles
Conservation Project Phase 1) included a number of activities aimed at identifying and
addressing the issues. A preliminary workshop was held in 1988 at which 14 papers were
presented. A second workshop was held in 1991 to collate the information and come up
with specific recommendations. In the meanwhile several educational, communication,
and awareness creation activities were carried out by the Forest Department with the
support of the provincial administration. These included local workshops, the setting up of
community based organizations in many of the peripheral villages for the conservation and
preservation of the Knuckles range, essay and poster competitions, etc.
Elettaria cardamomum
55
2. Description of the Property

While all these positive developments were taking place, there was still the lingering
problem of identifying a precise boundary for marking the limits of the Knuckles
Conservation Area. The somewhat arbitrary decision to use the 3500 ft (1067 m) contour
was modified to include any contiguous forest areas that extended below the 1067 m
contour, irrespective of the altitude at which they occurred. On this basis the survey and
land-marking was carried out and it was completed in 1989. The survey party seems to
have had some difficulty in determining what were to be considered as contiguous forests
and as a result scrubland, patches of grassland, and some other nonforest areas got
included. Within the land-marked boundary there were sections of tea estates, other private
lands, encroachments, cardamom cultivations, etc. It has to be noted that the 1:50,000
topographical maps still carry the 1067 m contour line as the boundary of the conservation
area although the decision to use this contour line had been changed and the land-marking
done according to the revised decision. Based on the current, definitive boundary
determined in the above-mentioned survey, the Knuckles Conservation Forest was
declared as such by government gazette notification in May 2000.
In 1994, IUCN, with the collaboration of the Forest Department, prepared a management
plan for the Knuckles Conservation Forest. This plan has made recommendations
on how the integrity issues may be resolved.
Although well before that time the Forest Department had decided to ban the cultivation of
cardamom in the forest, the 1994 management plan refers to the large numbers that were
still engaged in cardamom cultivation. They fell into three categories: large scale absentee
cultivators using paid labour which resided within the conservation area; small to medium
cultivators on encroached land (resident in peripheral villages) or on privately owned land
within the conservation area; and state sector cardamom cultivators. The last mentioned
are areas under the State Plantations Corporation, most of which were below the 3500 ft
(1067 m) contour and therefore outside the area that had at first been earmarked as the
Knuckles Conservation Area.
An important recommendation made in the 1994 management plan was to stop all
cardamom cultivation in land over 3500 ft (1067 m), other than any well managed
plantations under state sector corporations which should be excluded from the Knuckles
Conservation Area. Resident cultivators within the Knuckles Conservation Area were to
be relocated.
The post-1994 period has seen considerable progress in pursuit of the conservation and
management of the KCF. All the resident cardamon cultivators within the conservation
area have been relocated outside the area. There still remain some persons (influential,
affluent cultivators) who, while residing in the cities, organize cardamon collection in 11
areas within KCF using hired labour. Legal action has been taken against these persons and
court orders have been received to stop this activity. No maintenance operations on the
cardamon plots are carried out in these areas. In the areas where cardamon cultivation has
been stopped ecological restoration does occur albeit slowly. In a few areas where the
cardamon bushes have been cut back regeneration of the original forest species is much
faster. Clearly this practice should be extended to speed up ecological restoration of the
under-planted areas.
When the KCF was legally declared a conservation forest there were a large number of
private land lots falling within the boundary. Inclusion of these lots within the boundary
was unavoidable if the conservation area was to be identified as an integral whole. These
inter
alia
56
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

private land lots do not constitute a part of the legally defined conservation area since only
state land within the defined boundary is included. At any rate it was deemed necessary to
eventually include these lots in the conserved area and action was taken to acquire them.
There are no residents in these lots and the land is in forest or scrub. Three-hundred-and-
fifty (mostly small) private lots have been identified and action will be taken to acquire
them, after which they would automatically become a part of the KCF. The process,
however, seems to be dragging on for several years. If acquisition is posing a problem, an
alternative would be for the Forest Department, in collaboration with the ministry of
environment and the Central Environmental Authority, to take action to declare all private
lands within the boundary of the KCF as environmentally sensitive areas under the
National Environmental Act. Such a declaration should also include the few villages that
remain within the boundary of the KCF.
During the past few years a conservation centre has been constructed at the Illukkumbura
entrance to the forest. This is quite a large complex. It includes an auditorium with the
necessary facilities, dormitories for large groups, and two eco-lodges with accommodation
for eight persons in each. Camping sites have also been provided. Interpretation facilities
are available, but need to be further developed. At the Illukkumbura entrance a post has
been set up for registering visitors and charging an entrance fee. A similar conservation
centre with an equal range of facilities has been constructed at Deanstone which is the
entrance to the KCF from the side opposite to Illukkumbura. For observation and study
purposes, several nature trails have been opened, and field guides have been appointed.
What is especially commendable is the interest that scientists (biologists and
archaeologists) have shown in recent years in investigating this exceptionally diverse
ecosystem
A great deal of attention is focused on the buffer zone communities with a view to obtaining
their cooperation for conservation of the forest. Community based organizations have
been formed and awareness programmes (for schools and the village community) are
regularly carried out. Local plants are distributed for planting in home gardens. A plant
sales outlet has been opened. Wood lots are established in the buffer zone, outside the
conservation forest.
Something very special in regard to winning the confidence of the village communities is
the organization of health camps which the Forest Department does regularly in
collaboration with the district staff of other institutions. This provides the people in these
remote areas with the rare opportunity of getting their health related problems attended to
by qualified staff virtually at their doorstep. This has been seen to advance the cause of
conservation of the forest in a very tangible way.
The Illukkumbura and Deanstone sections of KCF are under the control of Range Forest
Officers who are supported by other staff. The development work carried out in the past
few years augurs well for the future conservation of this valuable forest.
57
2. Description of the Property

3. Justification for Inscription
3.a Criteria under which inscription is proposed (and justification for
inscription under these criteria)
Criterion iii:
Bear a unique or at least exceptional testimony to a cultural tradition or to a
civilization which is living or which has disappeared.
.
Adam's Peak (called
in Pali and
in Sinhala, meaning sacred
footprint), is situated within PWPA Adam's Peak is perhaps the most venerated mountain
in the world. It has been described as a “natural cathedral so stupendous and exquisite that
none can stand upon it without worship in his soul” (Williams1950). Together with the
sacred Bo tree at Anuradhapura and the temple of the Tooth relic in Kandy, it is without
doubt one of the three most sacred places in Sri Lanka.
The history of Adam's Peak and its association with the evolving culture and civilization of
Sri Lanka dates back more than two millennia. The importance of this site for its unique
features of cultural and religious significance has grown in importance over the ages. At its
Samanta kuta
Sri Pada
The sacred peak during the pilgrim season
© Dominc Sansoni / Three Blind Men

very top, the Peak bears an indentation that resembles a foot print and it is based on this
feature that the Peak assumed a religious significance. The Peak is steeped in legend
antedating the Christian era. Four great religions of the world consider Adam's Peak a holy
mountain. The Buddhists call it
as they believe that the indentation is the footprint
of Lord Buddha. The Hindus believe that it is Lord Shiva's footprint. The Muslims take it to
be the footprint of Adam. The Roman Catholic legend is that it is the footprint of Saint
Thomas the apostle.
Although there are many different legends associated with Adam's Peak, the mountain has
had its strongest and millennia-long unbroken link to the Buddhist faith. Its cultural and
religious links, far from diminishing, had throughout the centuries and up to the present
time grown in magnitude in a remarkable manner and it is today held in the highest
veneration by the millions of pilgrims that trek to the peak every year.
In centuries past, the reigning monarchs joined the people visiting the Peak and paid
homage at the shrine. They directed action to be taken to ease the task of climbing to the
Peak and to provide support for the observance of religious activities. That such action was
taken with the technology available at the time is evident from the observations of Marco
Polo in the 13 century and Ibn Batuta in the 14 century. Further details supporting
justification are set out in the earlier sections of this nomination.
Besides paying homage at the shrine atop the Peak, many other religious practices, some
associated with other religions and with the primodial urge of man to worship dieties,
became, since ancient times, associated with pilgrimages to the Peak.
Adam's Peak is renowned not only as a religious monument. Many people, including
visitors from abroad, climb the mountain to witness the magnificent spectacle that could be
observed from the Peak at sunrise.
As regards HPNP, its uniqueness in relation to Criterion iii relate to how Mesolithic man
progressed from the hunter gatherer stage to organized agriculture over a span of several
millennia. Recent investigations have brought out palaeontological and palaeo-ecological
evidence that bears testimony to a saga of cultural evolution beginning in 24,000 years BP
when prehistoric man inhabited these plains to around 3600 years BP when the area was
eventually deserted. The details of the evidence in support of these findings are presented
under 2.a.2 and 2.b.1. The recently unraveled palaeo-ecological evidence indicates that
between 24,000 and 18,500 years BP the prehistoric humans occupying the plains were
hunter gatherers. Subsequently (17,600-16,000 years BP), with increasing humidity during
postglacial times, the inhabitants became more settled and began slash and burn, herding,
and incipient cultivation of oat and barley. With the passage of time, agricultural practices
advanced into more systematic management and with the increasing humid conditions rice
replaced oat and barley (13,000-8700 years BP). In later periods, climatic conditions began
to turn dry and concomitantly there was decreasing agricultural activity and by 3600 years
BP the area appears to have been abandoned.
The cultural importance of
KCF in relation to Criterion iii is based mainly on
archaeological investigations in KCF and its environs that have been carried out only
recently. These investigations have brought to light the existence of caves where the
presence of stone artifacts and animal remains suggest that these caves were the abode of
Mesolithic man around 30,000 years BP. In more recent times (2 century BC onwards)
these caves were used by Buddhist monks. (See 2.a.2 and 2.b.1).
Sripada
th
nd
60
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

Archaeological finds reveal that in pre-colonial times the people in KCF and its environs
engaged in trade with minerals and other natural products with neighbouring countries.
Another feature of particular significance is the existence within the Knuckles range of
ancient villages which until recently had hardly been touched by modern civilization. Until
a road was built into the area recently, their inaccessibility had sheltered the villages from
the influence of modernization. Examples of what remains of this disappearing culture
would be preserved as monuments.
HPNP is an example par excellence of a sequence of human cultural development and land
use spanning several millennia. The microliths and other evidence uncovered in Horton
Plains (described under section 2.a.2) show that the plains were occupied by mesolithic
man many thousands of years ago. The records of microfossils recovered from the peat
swamps of Horton Plains provide strong supportive evidence. Cores extracted from depths
down to six metres show a remarkable sequence of how prehistoric man who occupied
these areas adapted to changing climatic conditions which took place on a time scale
measured in millennia. Recently discovered evidence suggests that the cultural
developments that took place over these extended time periods were driven by the climatic
changes that occurred following the last glacial period.
Human occupation and cultural development in the Horton Plains began with prehistoric
man as far back as 24,000 years BP. During the last glacial maximum, 24,000-18,500 years
BP, the primitive culture that prevailed was that of the hunter-gatherer. During this period
very dry conditions prevailed as evidenced by the presence of pollen of xerophytic plants
(e.g.
).
It is generally believed that the world's earliest civilization based on the cultivation of rice,
oat and barley was in South Asia and that it dates back to 15,000 years BP. The recent
evidence unearthed in Horton Plains, however, shows that plant domestication took place
here at an earlier period, and independently, with the favourable change in the climate
bringing in wetter conditions (17,600-16,000 years BP). With the passage of time,
agricultural practices advanced into more systematic management and with the increasing
humid conditions rice replaced oat and barley (13,000-8700 years BP). In later periods,
climatic conditions began to turn dry and evidence of occupation is absent from around
Criterion v:
Be an outstanding example of a traditional human settlement, land-use, or sea-use
which is representative of a culture (or cultures), or human interaction with the
environment especially when it has become vulnerable under the impact of
irreversible change.
Chenopodium
Ancient artefacts (pottery) found at Horton Plains during
archaeological explorations
61
3. Justification for Inscription
© T R Premathilake

3600 years BP.
In the KCF, the presence of caves that were occupied by lay people at first and subsequently
worked on to provide drip ledges and occupied by Buddhist monks suggest early human
interaction with the environment in two different forms: the first a hunter-gatherer type and
later a more spiritually enlightened form.
The ancient village settlements in KCF present another aspect of cultural traditions that
have evolved over centuries. They relate to the mode of living of these communities where
they used the local resources for their sustenance. They cultivated locally available
varieties of rice and used organic manure. They developed their own mode of tilling the soil
using animal power and transporting goods using pack animals. The natural forest supplied
them with items of food and medicine. They had a great respect for, and lived in harmony
with, nature. Their dwellings were constructed out of locally available material and had
acquired characteristics of their own.
Paddy farming on a
small scale at
Meemure (top) is
still carried out
using many
traditional farming
methods, such as the
manual winnowing
of paddy (left)
62
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
© Pradeep Samarawickrama
© Studio Times

Because of the remoteness of the villages the mode of life and the practices of the people
living there remained virtually unchanged and were unaffected by modern developments
until recent years. Action will be taken to select and preserve a few dwellings constructed
in the ancient style and some of the agricultural implements, household items and other
artifacts that portray the traditional lifestyles of these communities.
The features of outstanding universal significance in PWPA in relation to this criterion
have to be considered in conjunction with the facts set out under criterion iii. In terms of
Criterion vi, the simple but aesthetically outstanding monument of the Adam's Peak
footprint shrine has been replicated in nearly every Theravada Buddhist temple erected
after the 13 century AD. This was the outcome of a period when the king who ruled at the
time persecuted the Buddhist monks who visited the shrine. This forced the monks to seek
refuge abroad and they took with them replicas of the footprint. This was the beginning of
the spread of the cult of footprint worship in all the Theravada Buddhist centres in the
region.
The pilgrim season at Adam's Peak starts annually with the full moon in the month of
December and goes on till May the following year. Particularly at the commencement of
the season, many traditional cultural rituals that have evolved through centuries are
performed by the devotees. These practices are predominantly Buddhistic although some
of them also relate to the worship of deities.
The cultural cum religious traditions relating to the Adam's Peak mountain are strongly
linked to the belief that the whole area (referred to as
in Pali and
in Sinhala) is in the domain of the deity
This deity is said to have
invited Lord Buddha to visit the mountain and place his footprint atop the peak. It is this
belief that had given the name
(or sacred footprint, in Sinhala) to what in English
texts is referred to as Adam's Peak.
At the beginning of the pilgrim season, on the full moon day in the month of December, the
statue of
which is, till then, in the custody of the
of the
Galpothawala temple in the Ratnapura district is ceremoniously taken to the
and then in procession to the sacred peak where it is installed and where it resides
through the pilgrim season for veneration by the pilgrims who come to worship the sacred
footprint. Devotion to the deity, to a large extent, arose out of the perceived need of the
pilgrims for protection against wild animals which in those ancient times was a very real
hazard.
The devotional acts of those who make the pilgrimage, and which have outlasted centuries,
broadly signify the entry of the pilgrims into an area held to be deeply sacred. Those who
would make the pilgrimage are expected to prepare themselves by keeping body and mind
pure and abstaining from food of animal origin for at least a week prior to the pilgrimage.
The pilgrims first take a bath in the
(a stream) to further purify themselves.
Then, clad modestly in white, they make their way up the trail. An important religious
practice during the climb is to thread a needle and deposit it at the spot called the
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə