Nomination of The Central Highlands of Sri Lanka: Its Cultural and Natural Heritage for inscription on the World Heritage List Submitted to unesco by the Government of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka



Yüklə 2.2 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə9/24
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü2.2 Mb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   24

Criterion vi:
Be directly or tangibly associated with events or living traditions, with ideas, or with
beliefs, with artistic and literary works of outstanding universal significance.
th
Samanta kuta
Samanala
adaviya
Sumana Saman.
Sri pada
Sumana Saman
viharadipathi
Maha Saman
Devalaya
Seetha Gangula
Indikatu
63
3. Justification for Inscription

Pana
haramiti pana
nade guru
kodhu kirikhodu
dandukhodu
Thunsarana
ambalama
Nona Ambalama
ambalama
pirivena
bikkhu
chena
Yakkha
. This is symbolic of the belief that the Lord Buddha on his way to the peak had
experienced a tear in his robe and a thread and needle was used to mend it. Another ritual is
to deposit a walking stick at a place called the
situated in one of the steepest
parts of the climb. This is symbolic of the pilgrim's religious fervor and his resolve to
overcome the difficulties of climbing the peak.
The leader of a group of pilgrims (chosen by virtue of age and having made several
previous visits to the peak) is called the
. First time visitors, children, and the
aged are named
,
and
, respectively. The pilgrims recite
religious stanzas as they climb the peak. These stanzas, written several centuries ago by a
blind poet, refer to themes in the
. They invoke the blessings of the Buddha on
those climbing the peak, call on the kindness of the deity Saman, and invoke blessings on
those who having worshipped at the peak are now descending. At the peak one of the
rituals is for a pilgrim who has worshipped at the peak more than once to toll the bell at the
peak to tally with the number of times he has made the pilgrimage.
Resting places called
had been put up in ancient times on the pilgrim paths
leading to the peak. Historically, one of these is said to have been put up by the poetess
Gajaman Nona from Matara and this is called by the name
. At the
commencement of the pilgrim season a long established tradition is for the local
government representative to make a trip to the peak to ensure that the paths and the
are in a fit condition.
In ancient times a
was located at Palabathgala, at the foot of Adam's Peak, where a
number of Buddhists monks (
) resided and treated the ailments of people, using
plant material from the natural forest.
In the Knuckles range, the inhabitants of the remote, ancient village settlements of
Knuckles such as Ettanwala, Pitawala, Kahagala, Illukkumbura, Rattinda and many
others developed cultural practices, many of which persist to the present day. Among the
religious and cult practices are those associated with
cultivation (slash and burn
agriculture). Several deities are linked with the practices carried out by the dry-farming
communities, with subtle differences between the different villages. The people in these
remote villages believed that adhering to traditional practices will safeguard them from
wild animals and ensure that they obtain a bountiful harvest from their crops (e.g. they
make thanksgiving offerings to specific deities from their first harvest). When they go into
the forest they adhere to certain practices to invoke the protection of deities. The precise
nature of the practices and invocations don't go on record, but are passed on to the younger
generation orally. They are meant to appease the deity who is the custodian of the forest
while seeking to safeguard the person concerned as well as others that visit the forest.
These beliefs, prevailing even today among the village folk, have gained strength as it has
been claimed that, quite often, those who had scoffed at the rituals had come to grief in one
way or another.
A range of ceremonies and other rituals are performed by the people invoking deities for
protection from harm and curing diseases. The remoteness and isolation of this region has
led to the persistence of many of the rituals developed and traditionally passed down from
generation to generation since ancient times. Particular deities are invoked for the curing
of diseases.
Besides deities, there are also strong beliefs in the power of demons (
), with
64
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List

different demons having different territories and lineages. These beliefs are of ancient
origin, dating back to the time of pre-historic and
communities in the Knuckles area.
The villagers made scare-crows and alarms made with iron, bamboo, and other natural
products to scare away animals that would otherwise destroy the crops, and these varied in
design and construction from village to village. Folk poetry associated with
cultivation also has a rich tradition in this region.
The Peak Wilderness range of mountains, with its prominent cone-shaped peak seen from
afar has, since ancient times, been a landmark for seafarers on their approach to Sri Lanka.
To quote from Sir James Emerson Tennent's masterpiece
(1859): “Like the Greek geographers, the earliest
Chinese authorities were struck by the altitude of the hills, and, above all, by the lofty crest
of Adam's Peak, which served as the landmark for ships approaching the island”.
Likewise the breathtaking view from the Peak has been described in superlative terms.
Tennant wrote: “The panorama from the summit of Adam's Peak is, perhaps, the grandest
in the world, as no other mountain, although surpassing it in altitude, presents the same
unobstructed view over land and sea - westward the eye is carried far over undulating
plains threaded by rivers like cords of silver, till in the purple distance the glitter of the
sunbeams on the sea marks the line of the Indian ocean”. In another description of the view
awaiting the lucky pilgrims that reach the Peak at dawn Herbert Keuneman states, “Those
who reach the summit by dawn witness an almost supernatural spectacle - the magnified
triangular shadow of the peak itself superimposed on the awakening countryside. On very
rare occasions one may witness the 'spectre of brocken' one's own immensely magnified
shadow borne on distant wraiths of mist, looped by a rainbow halo” (Anderson, no date).
Another quotation on the overpowering effect of the view from Adam's Peak would not be
out of place. Williams (1950), a 20 century tea planter wrote: “The peak itself is the last
gesture of defiance from a land mass between the Himalayas and the South Pole. And when
one is standing on its pinnacle, with the wilderness of the peak, a tumbled primeval forest
at one's feet, that the spirits of the men who have worshipped there throughout all the ages
hover in the clouds and rising mists, among the trees, caves and dark crevices with which
its towering slopes are honeycombed, is not difficult to believe.”
Describing the trek to the peak by pilgrims by their thousands and the spectacle awaiting
them, Simon (1989) writes: “They do not have long to wait. The eastern sky is glowing:
suddenly a fiery crack appears between earth and sky. On Adam's Peak, the sun has risen.
No one is watching. Instead, all eyes are resolutely turned westward, where something far
stranger is taking place. The Peak is casting its shadow upon the very air. The cone of
darkness mounts up to heaven right in front of the pilgrims' eyes; it is a signal from the
sacred mountain to the gods themselves. The watchers on the summit have their personal
messages to add to that mystic communication: cries of holy joy rend the air”.
A more mundane, nonetheless exceptional, feature of Peak Wilderness and its southern
foothills is the fact that these areas are the repository of world famous gemstones. The
millions of years of weathering and erosion that the ancient rocks of the central highlands
vedda
chena
Ceylon: an account of the island
Physical, Historical and Topographical
Criterion vii:
Contain superlative natural phenomena or areas of exceptional natural beauty and
aesthetic importance.
th
65
3. Justification for Inscription

had been subject to has resulted in the accumulation of gemstones of rare beauty, renowned
through the ages. A 400 carat blue sapphire from Sri Lanka is on the British crown, and the
so-called Star of India, a star sapphire displayed at New York's Museum of Natural History,
is from Sri Lanka (Gunawardena 2002).The main gem fields are around Ratnapura, to the
south of the Peak Wilderness Range
HPNP has become increasingly popular among nature lovers in recent years. Its main
attraction lies in the picturesque landscape of rolling grasslands. No visit to Horton Plains
is complete without a visit to “World's End”. At one point in the rim of Horton Plains there
is a near vertical drop of almost a kilometer to the plains below, with a spectacular view of
the dry zone lowland plain extending far out to the sea beyond. Some of the more
adventurous visitors climb the peaks of Totapolakanda or Kirigalpotha, in the periphery of
Horton Plains.
massif
The main attraction of KCF in terms of natural beauty is its distinctive and
impressive land forms. The geologist Cooray (1998) describes the Knuckles
Baker's Falls: a tourist attraction at HPNP
The rugged Knuckles mountain range with scenic
landscapes and a unique biota
66
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
© Studio Times
© Studio Times

thus: “Nowhere else in Sri Lanka, in an area of comparable size does one find such a
collection of magnificent peaks. There are 35 peaks rising over 915 m in the Knuckles
range (
.). Some of these peaks offer breathtaking views of the rugged mountainous
country.
John Davy (1821) in his 19 century writings on the Knuckles states “I never saw before so
perfect a specimen of forest scenery. Here lie trees of different kinds, sizes and ages: some
saplings, some dead and decaying, and some of very great bulk and height towering above
the rest in their prime”.
The perhumid southwest of Sri Lanka may be divided into two biogeographycal
components: the lowland and mid-country area and the submontane and montane area.
The former is represented by the Sinharaja Reserve World Heritage while the latter is
represented by the serial site now being nominated. Major changes in the earth's history
have left their stamp on the composition of the biota of southwest Sri Lanka where
biodiversity and species endemism are exceptionally high.
Sri Lanka was a small part of the continent of Gondwanaland which was a huge land mass
that included South America, Africa, Madagascar, the Seychelles, peninsular India and Sri
Lanka. The continent broke up during the Cretaceous Period and as the fragments moved
apart, the Deccan Plate rafted northwards. By then the angiosperms had evolved and had
spread over the continent of Gondwanaland. The Deccan Plate carried the gondwanic
biota Noah's Ark fashion, and in the Miocene Sri Lanka separated from the rest of the
Deccan Plate which formed peninsular India. Clearly therefore the bulk of the Sri Lankan
biota, as expected, has close affinities with the biota of India, particularly the southern part
of the subcontinent.
Of special interest in relation to the flora of Sri Lanka is the fact that some angiosperm
genera bear evidence of their ancient gondwanic ancestry. Two genera in particular have
been recognized in this respect. They are the endemics
(Monimiaceae) and
(Dilleniaceae) (Raven & Axelrod 1974).
, with three
species, is confined to the low and midcountry rainforest.
(which belongs to the
only endemic subfamily in Sri Lanka) has three species, with two,
and
confined to the montane zone and present in the nominated property.
From among the families of angiosperms, Ashton & Gunatilleke (1987a) consider that the
Dipterocarpaceae best fits the criteria set out by them for Noah's Ark dispersal. This family
is now pantropical, though with separate subfamilies (Monotoideae and
Dipterocarpoideae, the former in northern South America, tropical Africa and the
Seychelles, and the latter in Asia). At present, vicarious with both dipterocarp subfamilies
are the Sarcolaenaceae, now endemic to Madagascar but known from the Miocene of
South Africa. All dipterocarps examined have been seen to be ectomycorrhizal, and the
suspected affinity between the Dipterocarpaceae and Sarcolaenaceae has received
increased credibility recently by the demonstration of the ectomycorrhizal status of the
latter. This suggests that the common ancestor of the Sarcolaenaceae and Asian
dipterocarps was ectomycorrhizal and that the two groups would have separated with the
ibid
Hortonia
Schumacharia
Schumacharia
Hortonia
Hortonia floribunda
H. ovalifolia,
th
Criterion viii:
Be outstanding examples representing major stages of earth's history, including the
record of life, significant ongoing geological processes in the development of land
forms, or significant geomorphic or physiographic features.
67
3. Justification for Inscription

separation of the Madagascar and India land masses 88 million years ago (Ducousso et al.
2004). Among the Sri Lanka flora, the Dipterocarpaceae is remarkable in that all of its 58
species are endemic.
among them has 26 species spread over the full
amplitudinal range of the wet zone.
Another interesting family in relation to the record of life and its links with the geological
processes associated with the history of Gondwanaland is the Crypteroniaceae. Clock
independent dating estimates suggest that the divergence of Crypteroniaceae from its
African and South American relatives coincided with the breakup of Gondwanaland, and
that the Deccan Plate served as a raft transporting the Crypteroniaceae to Asia and that the
group later spread to SE Asia (Conti et al. 2002). This family is represented by the species
an endemic, in the midcountry and submontane rainforest. This
species has also variously been listed under Myrtaceae, Lythraceae and Melastomataceae.
Besides its lateral movement as part of the Deccan Plate, Sri Lanka was subject to episodes
of land upliftment with intermittent periods of erosion leading to peneplanation of the
uplifted land. The mountain building processes have resulted in the formation of the central
highlands, rising to over 2500 m above msl. The mountain building process has had a
profound influence on the distribution of biota within the country.
With its separation from the Indian peninsula in the Miocene, Sri Lanka became isolated
biogeographically except for brief periods up to the Holocene when land connections with
South India occurred. Southwest Sri Lanka is believed to have maintained its humid
rainforest conditions over a long geological period, and this together with its double
isolation from peninsular India, meaning the mountain barrier in the south central part of
the country and the large stretch of dry zone north of the central hills, have profoundly
influenced the post Miocene history of the biota.
Besides serving as a mountain barrier, the central highlands have more positively affected
the evolution of biota in the wet southwest of the country. As stated by Werner (1982),
“While the mountains of Sri Lanka were gradually uplifted during the Tertiary Period,
tropical lowland rainforest plants were exposed to a cooler climate. While many genera
disappeared completely, others developed new adapted species”. Thus, all the members of
the genus
disappeared completely from the higher altitudes, and in the
Clusiaceae some members of the genus
are now represented exclusively in
the montane areas, with
and
appearing prominently among the
dominant trees. The same trend can be seen among the fauna, with many species being
now found exclusively in the montane and submontane zones.
Stemonoporus
Axinandra zeylanica
Dipterocarpus
Calophyllum
C. walkeri
C. trapezifolium
Different Osbeckia spp. At
(left) and at
at (right)
KCF
Horton Plains
68
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
© Suranjan Fernando
© Studio Times

Today, the country is noted for its high level of biodiversity in the humid southwest, and
concomitantly, there is an exceptionally high level of endemicity. Endemism among the
flora is for the most part at the specific and intra-specific levels. Endemic genera are
relatively few in number and there are no endemics at the family level.
The geological events that led to the evolution of Sri Lanka have also profoundly affected
the fauna of the island, particularly in the wet southwest. There is an extraordinary level of
endemicity among the fauna within the wet zone where the three constituents of the serial
property are located. Even more significant in terms of the evolutionary importance of the
endemic species in the montane zone is that they are believed to represent “the most
conservative faunal elements (i.e. in the island) least disturbed by recent invasions from
south India” (Eisenberg and McKay 1970). Endemism is more marked in those faunal
groups with limited dispersal ability such as freshwater fishes and crabs, insects and
herpetofauna, compared with the birds and mammals.
The amphibian
has been isolated from the Indian group for the past 500,000
years with no biotic exchange (Bossuyt et al. 2004). This is supported by molecular studies
that show considerable divergence from the Indian sister taxa. The species used in the
analysis to represent the Indian sister group were
.
and
. The three
constituents of the serial property have between them the habitats of 23 endemic species of
of which at least seven species are entirely restricted in their occurrence to the
three nominated properties.
The endemic amphibian
has been recorded from PWPA and KCF.
There is molecular evidence that the endemic monotypic frog genus
has an
ancient lineage having diverged from the mainstream of the Ranidae even before the
Deccan plate separated from the Madagascar plate in the early Cretaceous (Pethiyagoda et
al. 2006). It is apparent that the sub-family concerned had branched off well before the
radiation of the other two subfamilies Raninae and Rachophorinae of the Ranidae. The
members of these latter two sub-families are now the dominant species within the Family
Ranidae in Asia (Pethiyagoda 2005b) while
is confined to Sri
Lanka.
The endemic frog genus
with its three species with allopatric distributions are
Philautus
P charius
P. signatus
Philautus,
Lankanectes corrugatus
Lankanectes
Lankanectes corrugatus
Nannophrys
Allopatric speciation: the globally threatened
confined to
the KCF (left) and
found in the PWPA and HPNP in the
central highlands.
Nannophrys marmorata
Nannophrys ceylonensis
69
3. Justification for Inscription
© Suranjan Fernando
© Ruchira Somaweera

70
Central Highlands of Sri Lanka:
Nomination for inscription on the World Heritage List
© Madhava Meegaskumbura
© Madhava Meegaskumbura
© Madhava Meegaskumbura
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Wildlife Heritage Trust
© Studio Times
P. femoralis, P. folicola, P. microtympanum, P. schmarda,
P. Reticulates, P. asankai, P. caeruleus, P. steineri, P. viridis
P. fulvus, P. macropus, P. frankenbergi, P. alto,
P. sarasinorum, P. stuarti, P. hoffmanni, P. mooreorum,
P. cavirostris that are globally threatened; a possibly still unnamed
species, photographed by the nomination team
Some endemic globally threatened
spp. within the
property (top to bottom, left to right):
Philautus

considered geographical relicts. The critically endangered
is confined to the
KCF while
is restricted to PWPA and other parts of the Central
Massif.
De Silva (2006) states that there are 11 geographically relict genera of reptiles in the island.
Of these, ten (
and
) are represented within
the three nominated properties. Some researchers have claimed to have also seen the
eleventh,
at Knuckles (Bambaradeniya & Ekanayake 2003). The three sites
together contain 20 species from these endemic genera out of a total of 31 in the island.
The endemic skink genus
represents a distinct lineage of the lygosomine
scincid radiation (Austin et al. 2004). All six species within the genus are represented
within the constituents of the nominated property, with one each being recorded only in
KCF and PWPA, and four recorded at both KCF and PWPA.
The uropeltid snakes (Family Uropeltidae) are believed to be from a primitive relict family
of snakes found only in Sri Lanka and the hill tracts of southwestern India (Gans and Baic
1977). It is believed that members of this family entered Sri Lanka during the Pliocene and
evolved here after their migration. All of the recognized 12 Sri Lankan species (within
three genera) of this family are endemic. KCF has five Uropeltid species, including
from an endemic monotypic genus (Crusz 1984;
Bambaradeniya & Ekanayake 2003).
The current composition and distribution of the fauna and flora of the country, particularly
those of the wet southwest, provide remarkable biogeographical evidence linking biotic
evolution with the geologically significant events that led to the making of Sri Lanka.
The outstanding examples representing the geologically more recent and the ongoing
ecological and biological processes in biotic evolution that characterize the rainforests of
Sri Lanka relate mainly to the post-Miocene period when Sri Lanka became
geographically isolated from peninsular India.
The wet southwest of Sri Lanka covers just 23% of the land area, and the climax vegetation
which at one time covered most of this area is rainforest. The wet zone has an altitude going
up from sea level to over 2500 m. Despite the extensive deforestation that has taken place,
the few forest areas that remain provide ample evidence of the biotic evolutionary
processes that have taken place from the Miocene to geologically more recent times, with
every reason to believe that they are ongoing and would continue if the remaining habitats
are given adequate protection. Among the flora the best example would be the
Dipterocarpaceae. The family is pantropic, with a lineage that dates back to a time prior to
the breakup of Gondwanaland. In Sri Lanka the members of this family have radiated to an
amazing extent. There are 58 species, all endemic, and all but one in the wet zone. There is
a clearly defined altitudinal spread of the species suggestive of allopatric speciation. This
feature is also evident in several other taxa e.g.
in the Clusiaceae,
in the Melastomaceae, and
in the Myrtaceae. Ashton & Gunatilleke (1987a)
N. marmorata
Nannophrys ceylonensis
Ceratophora, Cophotis, Lyriocephalus, Chalcidoseps, Lankascincus,
Nessia, Aspidura, Balanophis, Haplocercus
Pseudotyphlops
Cercapsis,
Lankascincus
Pseudotyphlops philippinus,
Calophyllum
Memecylon
Syzygium
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   24


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə