Northern Copperhead The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore



Yüklə 25.28 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix10.07.2017
ölçüsü25.28 Kb.

3/10/2015 

Northern Copperhead                        The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore 

Fact Sheet: Northern Copperhead 

Agkistrodon contortrix mokasen 

 

Description: 



•  Size: 

o

  Length:    22-53 in (60-134.5cm)   



•  Sexual dimorphism: Females are larger than males in total size, but males have longer 

tails than females.   

•  Physical Description: thick bodied snakes with keeled scales. Head triangular in shape, 

with eyes that have elliptical pupils. 

•  Coloration: Head is reddish copper, with the rest of the body varying from pink to 

gray-brown, with a dark brown hourglass pattern on its back and sides.   

 

In the Wild 



 

Habitat and Range: 

•  Geographic range- Eastern United States, from Massachusetts south to Georgia and 

Alabama and west to Illinois. 

•  Preferred Habitat- open woodlands, often hilly with rocky outcroppings; wetland shores. 

 

Diet:   



•  Carnivore 

o

  Common prey items include rodents, small birds, lizards, frogs, and insects 



(especially cicadas) 

o

  Can swallow prey several times larger in diameter than itself due to a remarkably 



flexible jaw. 

•  Copperheads use venom to help kill their prey 

o

  When hunting, they strike quickly and retreat if the prey is large, letting the 



toxins take effect before trying to swallow the prey. If the prey is small, they will 

hold the prey in their mouths until it succumbs to the venom.   

o

  Copperhead venom is a hemotoxin, which is hemolytic (breaks down red blood 



cells). It causes bleeding, swelling and breathing difficulty. It is lethal venom to 

small mammals, but is not normally lethal to humans in normal bite quantities.   

 

Adaptations: 



•  Copperheads have excellent camouflage which helps them blend into their 

environment. This helps them avoid detection form both predators and prey.   

•  Like most snakes, Northern copperheads “taste” the air with their tongues, by gathering 

chemical information and bringing it to their Jacobson’s organ in their mouths to smell 

chemical signals. They are very sensitive to chemical signals and can use this sense to 

find prey. 

•  As pit vipers, Northern copperheads have heat sensitive pit organs located between the 

nostrils and the eyes. They are very sensitive to minute changes in temperature, and can 

sense prey by their body heat. 


3/10/2015 

Northern Copperhead                        The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore 

•  As cold-blooded animals, Northern copperheads cannot handle being active in cold 

temperatures and hibernate in dens in the winter. Although normally solitary when 

active, when they den in the winter, there can be many individuals using the same den, 

which also sometimes includes other snakes such as rattlesnakes and black rat snakes. 

This is thought to help them conserve body heat. 

 

Lifespan:   



•  18 years on average, up to 30 years in captivity 

 

Ecosystem relationships: 



•  Predators: Some animals that might prey on copperheads are eagles, hawks, coyotes, 

and raccoons. 

•  Interspecies competitors: Copperheads compete with other snakes, birds of prey, and 

carnivorous mammals for their prey.   

•  Role/ Niche: copperheads are important in the ecosystem as both predators and prey. 

They help keep the populations of rodents and other prolific animals in balance. 

 

Reproduction: 



•  Breeding season: February to May, and August to October. Fall breeders store sperm 

internally until the spring, when eggs are fertilized. 

•  Behavior: Copperheads are ovoviviparous, which means young are hatched from eggs 

that are held internally instead of being laid. Mating takes place in the spring; males find 

receptive females by following scent trails. After mating takes place, males produce a 

pheromone that makes females less attractive to other males, so females usually only 

mate once per year.   

•  Incubation: 3-9 months 

•  Offspring: 2-10 live young 

•  Maturation: copperheads reach reproductive maturity at about 4 years old.   

 

Activity: 



•  Diurnal or nocturnal, depending on season. 

•  Normally solitary, but hibernates in large groups in the winter   

 

Other “fun facts”: 



•  When threatened, copperheads emit a musk that smells like cucumbers.   

•  Copperhead venom has been used as a source for many medical breakthroughs. Some 

of venom’s more common effects include blocking the transmission of nerve impulses, 

thinning blood, shocking the heart, and rapidly breaking down flesh and muscle. 

Medicines have been synthesized using these properties to help treat pain, reduce 

blood pressure, and treat a variety of neurological and infectious diseases. 

 

Conservation Status and Threats: 



•  Listed on the IUCN Red List as least concern. Considered endangered in parts of its 

range, such as Massachusetts.   

•  Threats: Habitat loss, killed by humans, pet trade collection. 


3/10/2015 

Northern Copperhead                        The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore 

•  Conservation efforts: Since they are not federally listed as a threatened species, there 

are currently no specific conservation actions directed for Northern copperheads. 

However, Northern copperheads, like all snakes native to Maryland, are protected by 

the Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act and cannot be killed, 

possessed, bred, or sold without first acquiring the proper permit from the Maryland 

Department of Natural Resources. Additionally, Maryland requires a Captive Reptile and 

Amphibian Permit for the possession, breeding, and sale of native reptiles and 

amphibians in the state. 

 

At the Zoo 



•  At the Zoo we have three Northern copperheads.    Two males are currently on exhibit, 

female is off exhibit to avoid unexpected breeding.    Parthenogenesis has been 

documented in this species, so that is also something that we are cautious of when 

housing the female.   

 

What We Can Do 



•  Do not disturb Northern copperheads if encountered in the wild, as this will avoid 

injuries to either you or the snake. Copperheads can often be found sunning themselves 

on rocks during the day, so use caution when hiking through rocky areas. 

•  Do not harm or kill copperheads. Copperheads help keep down vermin populations. If 

one is found on your property, call animal control or DNR in order to have it safely 

relocated. 

•  Make environmentally responsible lifestyle decisions to help conserve habitat –   

conserve energy and resources, reduce litter and pollution. 

•  Support the conservation efforts of local organizations like The Maryland Zoo as well as   

organizations working in the field to protect wildlife and conserve habitat. 

 

References:   



• 

http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Agkistrodon_contortrix/

   

• 

http://www.marylandzoo.org/animals-conservation/reptiles/northern-copperhead/



   

• 

http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/64297/0



   


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə