Nutritional Data for Australian Native Foods



Yüklə 266.71 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/2
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü266.71 Kb.
  1   2

Nutritional Data for  

Australian Native Foods 



Supporting the Food Standards Australia and 

New Zealand Nutritional Panel Calculator

OCTOBER 2012

 RIRDC Publication No. 12/099


 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Nutritional Data for Australian 

Native Foods 

Supporting the Food Standards Australia and New Zealand 

Nutritional Panel Calculator 

  

 



by Chris Read 

 

 



 

October 2012 

 

RIRDC Publication No. 12/099 



RIRDC Project No. PRJ-006736 

 


 

ii 


© 2012 Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation.  

All rights reserved.    

 

ISBN 978-1-74254-441-0 



ISSN 1440-6845 

Nutritional Data for Australian Native Foods – Supporting the Food Standards Australia and New Zealand 

Nutritional Panel Calculator 

Publication No. 12/099 

Project No. PRJ-006736 

The information contained in this publication is intended for general use to assist public knowledge and 

discussion and to help improve the development of sustainable regions. You must not rely on any 

information contained in this publication without taking specialist advice relevant to your particular 

circumstances.  

While reasonable care has been taken in preparing this publication to ensure that information is true and 

correct, the Commonwealth of Australia gives no assurance as to the accuracy of any information in this 

publication. 

The Commonwealth of Australia, the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation (RIRDC), the 

authors or contributors expressly disclaim, to the maximum extent permitted by law, all responsibility and 

liability to any person, arising directly or indirectly from any act or omission, or for any consequences of any 

such act or omission, made in reliance on the contents of this publication, whether or not caused by any 

negligence on the part of the Commonwealth of Australia, RIRDC, the authors or contributors.

 

The Commonwealth of Australia does not necessarily endorse the views in this publication.



 

This publication is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, all other rights 

are reserved. However, wide dissemination is encouraged. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction 

and rights should be addressed to the RIRDC Publications Manager on phone 02 6271 4165. 



Researcher Contact Details 

Dr  Chris Read 

PO Box 194 

WOODBRIDGE  7162  Tasmania 

Email:  info@diemenpepper.com 

 

In submitting this report, the researcher has agreed to RIRDC publishing this material in its edited form. 



RIRDC Contact Details 

Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation 

Level 2, 15 National Circuit  

BARTON   ACT   2600 

PO Box 4776 

KINGSTON   ACT   2604   

Phone:   02 6271 4100 

Fax: 


02 6271 4199 

Email:   rirdc@rirdc.gov.au. 

Web: 

http://www.rirdc.gov.au 



Electronically published by RIRDC in October 2012 

Print-on-demand by Union Offset Printing, Canberra at 

www.rirdc.gov.au

  

or phone 1300 634 313 



 

iii 


Foreword 

The Australian native plant food industry has identified several issues constraining growth and 

uptake of the novel food ingredients obtained from indigenous flora. One of these constraints is 

the lack of supporting technical and nutritional information which potential users (chefs, value-

adders and processors) can draw upon in their quest to incorporate the ingredients, and the 

flavours they confer, into the national cuisine. 

Most of the 20 key native food ingredients are utilised as ingredients in manufactured products

and it is a requirement of the Australian Food Standards Code that when manufactured products 

are offered for sale, the label should display the familiar nutritional panel information informing 

the consumer of a number of nutritional parameters (energy content, fat, protein, sugars etc). It is 

common manufacturing practice to employ the Food Standards authority’s own on-line calculator 

to derive these panels when developing a new product. 

The procedure simply requires the manufacturer to enter ingredient quantities into the web based 

form, whereupon the calculator draws on the extensive database to extrapolate the nutritional 

parameters for the finished product.  

This project has succeeded in adding data for fourteen key native food products to the database 

behind the calculator, enabling formulators to confidently publish the nutritional values for their 

new products. This, in turn, will encourage wider use of the flavours and ingredients, and will 

help build a manufacturing market for them. The benefits, therefore, will flow to the producers 

and value-adders alike through building market diversity and scale. 

This research has resulted in an extensive set of analytical results for each of the fourteen 

products – besides the basic nutritional panel calculator (NPC) data, the appendices to this report. 

The project was proposed and planned by members of the Australian Native Food Industry body, 

and funded by a grant from RIRDC Core Funds, provided by the Australian Government. This 

funding was matched by cash contributions from a small group of committed native produce 

practitioners – growers, primary processors, and marketers including, notably, a substantial 

sponsorship from the Coles Indigenous Food Fund. ANFIL, and the researcher, are grateful for 

the financial support provided by all contributors, and for the generous donations of product, and 

supplementary information, provided. 

This report is an addition to RIRDC’s diverse range of over 2100 research publications, and it 

forms part of our New Plant Products R&D program, which aims to contribute to the program’s 

first stated objective of ‘Developing and supplying product information to support market access 

and market growth’. 

 

Most of RIRDC’s publications are available for viewing, free downloading or purchasing online 



at 

www.rirdc.gov.au

. Purchases can also be made by phoning 1300 634 313.

 

 



Craig Burns 

Managing Director 

Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation 


 

iv 


About the Author 

Chris Read is a Founding Board Member of ANFIL (Australian Native Food Industry Ltd), a 

farmer in southern Tasmania, and, for the purposes of this project, a horticultural researcher, 

having worked on essential oils and native plant food research projects during the last 15 years, 

first at the University of Tasmania, and more recently in an independent capacity. 

 

Acknowledgments 

The author wishes to thank his correspondent at FSANZ, Gregory Milligan for his help with this 

project.  

 

Abbreviations 

ANFIL - Australian Native Food Industry Ltd 

NPC - Nutritional Panel Calculator 

NMI - National Measurement Institute - the Australian Government Analytical Laboratory 

FSANZ - Food Standards Australia and New Zealand 

NUTTAB 2010 - FSANZ reference database containing food composition data for several 

thousand foods, and nutrient data for up to 245 nutrients 


 



Contents 



Foreword ....................................................................................................................................... iii 

About the Author .......................................................................................................................... iv 

Acknowledgments ......................................................................................................................... iv 

Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................ iv 

Executive Summary..................................................................................................................... vii 

Introduction ....................................................................................................................................1 

Objectives ........................................................................................................................................2 

Methodology ....................................................................................................................................2 

Sampling Protocol ...................................................................................................................... 4 

Analytical Methods ..................................................................................................................... 5 

Data Presentation ....................................................................................................................... 5 

Results ..............................................................................................................................................6 

Implications .....................................................................................................................................8 

Recommendations...........................................................................................................................8 

Appendices ......................................................................................................................................9 

Appendix 1: Submissions to FSANZ ......................................................................................... 9 

1. Anise Myrtle ..........................................................................................................................9 

2. Bush Tomato ........................................................................................................................12 

3. Desert Lime ..........................................................................................................................16 

4. Fingerlimes ..........................................................................................................................18 

5. Kakadu Plum ........................................................................................................................22 

6. Lemon Aspen .......................................................................................................................25 

7. Lemon Myrtle ......................................................................................................................29 

8. Olida .....................................................................................................................................33 

9. Sea Parsley ...........................................................................................................................37 

10. Tasmannia Pepperberry .....................................................................................................41 

11. Tasmannia Pepperleaf ........................................................................................................45 

12. Rivermint ...........................................................................................................................49 

13. Saltbush ..............................................................................................................................52 

14. Satinash ..............................................................................................................................55 

APPENDIX 2: Analytical Methods ......................................................................................... 59 

1. Trace Elements VL 247 Vers. 9.0 ........................................................................................59 

2. Determination of Ash: VL 286 Vers. 5.1 .............................................................................60 

3. Fatty Acids VL 289 Vers. 7.0 ..............................................................................................61 

4. Common Sugars: VL 295 Vers. 7.0 .....................................................................................62 

5. Moisture: VL 298 Vers. 6.2 .................................................................................................63 

6. Fat by Mojonnier: VL 302 Vers. 7.0 ....................................................................................64 

 


 

vi 


Tables 

Table 1: 

Subject species: Current listing status and nomenclature ..........................................3 

Table 2: 

Supplementary information provided by the producer, to accompany sample 

submissions to NMI...................................................................................................4 

Table 3: 

National Measurement Institute Nutritional Panel Analysis .....................................5 

Table 4: 

Summary of proximate analysis for subject species ..................................................7 

 


 

vii 


Executive Summary 

What the report is about 

This report details the analysis of a key group of 14 native species for their nutritional properties

in particular, those which are reported in the nutritional panels found on most manufactured 

products.  

Through liaison with Food Standards Australia and New Zealand (FSANZ), this data has been 

incorporated into the database employed by the online calculator which is used by manufacturers 

to prepare these panels for their labelling. 

Who is the report targeted at? 

The stakeholders for the work presented in this report are the providers, producers and consumers 

of native food ingredients. In particular, the outcomes from the research will be available online 

to help generate the Nutritional Panels which are mandated for all commercially available 

manufactured food products in Australia. 

Where are the relevant industries located in Australia?  

The industry broadly represents products from a very wide range of plant communities and 

similarly diverse producers, business models, regions and food types.  

Sub tropical and desert fruit, warm and cool temperate herbs and spices, arid zone fruits and 

seeds, and tropical tree fruit are represented. Producers tend to be concentrated in regional areas – 

in particular the central deserts, warm subtropical rainforest areas of SE Queensland, northern 

NSW, tropical areas in far northern Australia, and along the south coast of Victoria and South 

Australia and in Tasmania. 

The best estimate of numbers of producers in the different sectors of the industry are reported in 

the recently released Australian Native Food Industry Stocktake (RIRDC Publication No 12/066). 



Background 

In order to move into mainstream consumption, the ingredients generally regarded as ‘native 

foods’, (i.e. edible products of indigenous Australian plant species), must be supported by the 

same level of scientific and technical information as are other commonly used foodstuffs.  

In most cases the native food ingredients are used to confer special or unusual flavours to 

manufactured products, rather than as fresh ingredients in their own right. It follows that the best 

prospect for growth in the industry, and among the component species, is to encourage 

manufacture of products containing them. Manufacturers need reliable data describing nutrient 

content in these ingredients to facilitate their incorporation in manufactured products.  

Aims/objectives 

•  To gather reliable, technically accurate data on nutritional properties, in particular the 

proximate analysis for 14 of the key native food ingredients regarded as commercially 

significant. 

 


 

viii 


Methods used  

Producers supplied representative samples of their raw ingredient products to a recognised 

analytical laboratory (NMI) in Victoria, where they were analysed for a number of nutritional 

parameters. 

The results of this work were collated, combined with supplementary data indicating product type 

(format) post harvest treatment and typical applications, and provided to a working group within 

FSANZ which examined the information before incorporating it into their database. 

Results/key findings 

•  At the time of completion of this report, the new data, relating to the 14 additional native 

food products, has been uploaded, and is now available for use in preparing nutritional 

panels 


(http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/foodstandards/nutritionpanelcalculator/npcdatabase2011

files/) 


•  Detailed additional information regarding composition is provided in the Appendix to this 

report 


•  The availability of the new data will allow manufacturers, chefs and others to confidently 

include these products in their recipes, and to easily generate the mandatory nutritional 

panels, incorporating the contributions of these ingredients. 

 

Implications for relevant stakeholders  

•  The native food industry

 can take confidence that the native produce they grow and 

supply can be incorporated into recipes for which nutritional panel can be generated 

to satisfy the Food Standards Authority 

•  Policy makers can recognise that Australian native foods, products and cuisine are 

part of the normal dietary offering, and need support at a policy level in order that 

they may be traded both within Australia, and in export markets. 



Recommendations 

The results of this work need to be targeted at individuals and enterprises that use native food 

ingredients in manufacturing products for human consumption. 

 

 



 



Introduction 

Provision of nutritional data for food ingredients is essential for the delivery of any foodstuff to the 

market today. Nutritional information about native food products has, until recently often been 

provided on an ad hoc basis by those producers able or inclined to obtain data for the purposes of their 

own marketing effort. 

 

Food Standards Australia and New Zealand (FSANZ) maintain an on-line Nutritional Panel Calculator 



(NPC) for use by the food industry in preparing compositional tables for food ingredients and recipes. 

The calculator is supported by a database of nutritional information (‘NPC Database 2011) that meets 

strict standards of conformity, so that the panels generated are consistent and reliable.  

The relationship between these resources is described*  as follows: ‘the NPC database 2011 contains 

nutrient data for 2520 foods/ ingredients, sourced from several previously published Australian food 

composition databases including NUTTAB (NUTrient TABles) (mainly NUTTAB 2010) and 

AUSNUT (AUStralian food and NUTrient database) (mainly AUSNUT 2007) databases. NUTTAB is 

Australia’s reference nutrient database. AUSNUT is a survey database. It contains nutrient values for 

foods consumed during national nutrition surveys. It should be noted that neither of these databases 

have been designed for the purposes of calculating nutrition information panels’. 

 

While FSANZ’ general database of nutritional tables, - NUTTAB 2010, includes a ‘subset’ of data for 



some 487 indigenous edible plant species, this data omits a number of important species for which the 

available data is incomplete, or has been obtained using non-conforming methodologies and is NOT 

adequate for the purposes of the database.  

 

The central task of the current project, therefore, is to derive good quality data to complete the 



NUTTAB 2010 listing for at least the main commercial native food species, and to ensure that this 

data is incorporated into the NPC Database 2011, so that the information is readily available on-line 

for native food stakeholders at all levels in the industry.  

 

Australian Native Food Industry Ltd (ANFIL) worked with the Novel Foods Reference Group and the 



Advisory Committee on Novel Food in FSANZ during 2007 – 2009 to present documentary evidence 

and supporting explanation for consideration of twenty native food species as ‘traditional’ foods. This 

was part of a larger project investigating the status of these native food products in the national and 

international jurisdictions. The result of this work was the acceptance by FSANZ of all twenty species 

as ‘traditional Australian foods’. 

This project was proposed with a budget adequate to provide data for eight key products: Lemon and 

anise myrtle, native pepper leaf and berry, desert limes, fingerlimes, lemon aspen and a second species 

of Davidson plum. 

 

In the final implementation, as a result of strong support from producers, the Coles Indigenous Food 



Fund and other sponsors, the project generated data for 14 products in all – the additional products 

being satinash, river mint, sea parsley, bush tomato, kakadu plum, saltbush, and strawberry gum. In the 

event, the second species of Davidson Plum was dropped from the project after extensive discussions 

with several producers concluded that the industry did not consider it of enough importance or concern 

to warrant separate consideration. 

 

*Note: This explanation is available in more detail from the FSANZ website 



(

www.foodstandards.gov.au/

); Explanatory Notes to the NPC Database, FSANZ 2011 


 

 


  1   2


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə