Nutritional Data for Australian Native Foods



Yüklə 266.71 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə2/2
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü266.71 Kb.
1   2

Objectives 

In order to provide FSANZ with good quality data on the main commercial native food species, to 

enable them to be incorporated in the NPC, this project set out to: 

•  develop (through consultation with key industry participants, FSANZ and the National 

Measurement Institute (NMI)) a sampling protocol to ensure representative, good quality 

product of commercial grade is utilised for analysis; 

•  coordinate the acquisition and presentation of sample material for analysis; 

•  collate and document all supplementary information required for the FSANZ analytical 

program; 

•  engage the services of NMI – a Federal Government analytical facility in Melbourne to 

conduct analysis and prepare tables suitable for submission to FSANZ, liaise with 

representatives of FSANZ to ensure incorporation of this data and existing nutritional data into 

the NUTTAB 2010 and the NPC database 2011, as soon as possible and to address some 

minor problems of nomenclature and description revealed during the initial research into the 

current content of the FSANZ indigenous food files. 

 

 



Methodology 

The project began in July 2011, with detailed discussions with representatives from FSANZ, following 

investigation of the Food Standards database to determine exactly the status of the species in which 

commercial trade was considered to be significant.  

A summary of the conclusions of these discussions is shown below (Table 1), which includes notes 

explaining the current level of nutritional data available through the FSANZ website. As shown, while 

some species are accessible via the existing NPC, (grey shade), the names used are confusing or not 

widely known. Several priority species, for which there is some data available, are listed in the 

NUTTAB database, but because the data is inadequate, it is not available to the NPC (orange shade). 

Lastly, a group of species regarded as commercially important are completely absent from the FSANZ 

data store (red shade), described as ‘not presented’. 


 

 



Table 1: Subject species: Current listing status and nomenclature 

Industry preferred 

common names 

NUTTAB Name 

Status in FSANZ Databases etc 

Wattleseed 

(Acacia spp., predominantly Acacia 



victoriae

Gundabluey 

Gundabluey' included in NUTTAB 2006 and 

NUTTAB 2010. Wattleseed, acacia, ground 

included in the new NPC (not gundabluey) 

Davidson plum 

(Davidsonia pruriens) 

Davidson plum 

Included in NUTTAB 2006, NUTTAB 2010 and 

the new NPC** 



Riberry 

(Syzygium leuhmanii

Small leaf 

watergum 

Included in NUTTAB 2006, NUTTAB 2010 and 

the new NPC 



Illawarra plum 

(Podocarpus elatus

Brown pine 

Included in NUTTAB 2006, NUTTAB 2010 and 

the new NPC 

Quandong 

(Santalum acuminatum

  

Included in NUTTAB 2006, NUTTAB 2010 and 



the new NPC 

Lemon myrtle 

(Backhousia citriodora

  

Included in NUTTAB 2010 



Bush tomato 

(Solanum centrale

Bush raisin 

Included in NUTTAB 2006 and NUTTAB 2010 



Kakadu plum 

(Terminalia ferdinandiana

Billy goat plum 

Included in NUTTAB 2006 and NUTTAB 2010 



Finger limes 

(Citrus australasica

  

Included in NUTTAB 2006 and NUTTAB 2010 



Desert lime 

(Citrus glauca

  

Not presented 



Anise myrtle 

(Syzygium anisatum

  

Not presented 



Tasmannia pepperberry 

(Tasmannia lanceolata): Berry 

  

Not presented 



 Tasmannia pepperberry 

(Tasmannia lanceolata): Leaf 

  

 Not presented 



Lemon aspen 

(Acronicia acidula/subarosa

  

Not presented 



Satinash 

(Syzygium fibrosum

  

Not presented 



Saltbush 

(Atriplex spp.) 

  

Not presented 



Rivermint 

(Mentha australis

  

Not presented 



Sea Parsley  

(Apium prostratum

  

Not presented 



Olida  

(Eucalyptus olida

  

Not presented 



 

Fourteen of these products (including two for Tasmannia pepper) required substantial data collection 

and analysis in order to be suitable for inclusion in the FSANZ databases.  

Prominent producers of each of the products were approached to contribute both representative 

product samples, and supporting cash contributions. In this way the project was able to almost double 

the number of products assessed. 



 



Sampling Protocol 

Discussions between producers, the principle researcher and representatives of FSANZ and the 

analysing laboratory, National Measurement Institute (NMI), established a basic sampling and sample 

handling protocol. From this, a Chain of Custody form and simple cover sheet was developed, with 

instructions to guide the producer in preparing and despatching their sample(s) and gathering basic 

information about the sample:  the plant species, plant part used, post harvest preparation and further 

processing. An example of the supplementary data is shown below in Table 2. 



Table 2: Supplementary information provided by the producer, to accompany sample 

submissions to NMI 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

Anise Myrtle – leaf, dried and ground 

Alternative names, synonyms

if any. 

-Formerly Aniseed myrtle 

Botanical Name 

Syzygium anisatum, formerly  Anetholea anisata (Vickery) Peter 

G Wilson (formerly Backhousia anisata

Commentary on nomenclature  Present name chosen to avoid perceived confusion with aniseed 

(Apiaceae), and seed spice products 

Producer/manufacturer: 

Australian Rainforest Products 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

Lismore district, orchard grown 

Clone, variety or selection, if 

any: 

N/A 


Batch preparation (post 

harvest) 

Leaf is dried, stripped from twigs, milled to order. 

Sampling method: 

 

Subsample ex commercial batch 210239 



Date of harvest 

18/5/2011 

Sampling date: 

17 October 2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

17 October 2011 

 

In the event, good quality sample material of all 14 products was obtained and in a coordinated effort,  



sent to NMI in Melbourne, where the analyses required to generate nutritional panels was undertaken. 

 



Analytical Methods 

NMI offer a standard Nutritional Panel Analysis based on the requirements of the Food Standards 

Code (FSC) mandatory tests, which is shown in Table 3 below.  

 

Table 3: National Measurement Institute Nutritional Panel Analysis 

NUTRITIONAL PANEL ANALYSIS  

(as per FSC mandatory tests)

 

LIMIT OF 



REPORTING 

(mg/kg)

 

Energy Calculation 



 

Fat 


0.2mg/100g 

Protein 


0.2mg/100g 

Carbohydrate (by difference) 

 

Sugars 


0.1g/100g 

Sodium 


Mg/100g 

Saturated Fat (Calculation) 

 

Moisture (to calculate Energy and carbohydrate) 



0.2mg/100g 

Ash (to calculate Energy and carbohydrate 

0.1g/100g 

FAMES (to calculate saturated fat) 

0.10% 

 

The methodologies used for these assays are detailed in Appendix 2. 



In addition to these assays, in most cases analysis for Total Dietary Fibre analysis and Starch was also 

undertaken, under contract by NMI to an independent laboratory (Grain Growers, North Ryde, NSW). 



Data Presentation 

For the purposes of supplying the NMI results to FSANZ it was agreed that we would supply a 

combined laboratory report with the details in Table 2 above directly to the official managing the 

project for FSANZ. These submission files are included at Appendix 1.  

The results were reviewed by a FSANZ Working Group, checked for consistency with other similar 

food types and plant products to ensure the results ‘made sense’. In several cases issues were raised 

with the researcher and further examination of the laboratory data and calculations was requested 

where apparent anomalies were detected. This process underwent several iterations until the group 

were satisfied with the results presented.  The data were then prepared for uploading into the 

NUTTAB 2010 and AUSNUT databases, and from these, the proximate analysis (a subset of the 

whole dataset) extracted for incorporation into the nutritional panel calculator. 


 



Results 

Raw data is presented in the NMI laboratory reports in Appendix 1. These tables include a great deal 

of data regarding the composition of the carbohydrate and fat fractions, sodium levels, fibre and starch. 

From the data presented in those tables, the information necessary to generate nutritional panels was 

extracted as summarised in Table 4.  

This table essentially summarises the date now available for each of the native food products via the 

FSANZ On-Line Nutritional Panel Calculator and the nutritional database. 

  


 

 



 

Table 4: Summary of proximate analysis for subject species 

 

Industry preferred 

names 

Food names 

presented on the 

NPC 

Descriptions 

Energy,  

Kj 

Protein, 

g. 

Total 

fat, g 

Total 

saturated fatty 

acids, g 

Available 

carbohydrate, 

g 

Total sugars, 

g 

Lemon myrtle, leaf, 

dried, ground 

Lemon myrtle, 

leaf, dried, ground 

Dried leaf of Backhousia 



citriodora, whole or 

ground. 


683 

8.3 


1.8 

0.5 


1.8 

1.8 


Bush tomato, fruit, dried 

Bush tomato, 

fruit, dried 

Dried fruits of Solanum 



centrale 

998 


10.3 

6.0 


1.5 

29.2 


29.0 

Kakadu plum, deseeded, 

pureed and frozen 

Kakadu plum, 

fruit 

Deseeded fruit pulp of 



Terminalis ferdinandiana 

116 


1.0 

0.0 


0.0 

2.5 


2.5 

Finger lime, fruit, frozen 

Finger lime, fruit 

Fruit pulp of Citrus 



australasica 

144 


1.6 

1.0 


0.2 

1.3 


1.2 

Desert lime, fruit, frozen 

Desert lime, fruit 

Fruit pulp of Citrus glauca  198 

0.1 

2.7 


1.0 

4.0 


4.0 

Anise myrtle, leaf, dried,  

ground 

Anise myrtle, leaf, 



dried,  ground 

Dried leaf of Syzygium 



anisatum, whole or ground 

629 


8.1 

0.0 


0.0 

3.6 


3.6 

Native pepper, berry, 

dried 

Native pepper, 



berry, dried 

Dried ripe berries of 



Tasmannia lanceolata 

1073 


4.8 

6.7 


0.6 

24.0 


24.0 

Native pepper, leaf, 

dried, ground 

Native pepper, 

leaf, dried, ground 

Dried leaf of Tasmannia 



lanceolata, ground 

749 


7.4 

4.5 


1.5 

2.7 


2.5 

Lemon aspen, fruit juice, 

frozen 

Lemon aspen, 



fruit juice 

Juice or puree of Acronicia 



acidula or A. subarosa 

120 


2.0 

0.9 


0.2 

1.9 


1.9 

Satinash, fruit, deseeded, 

frozen 

Satinash, fruit 



Deseeded pulp of 

Syzygium fibrosum 

46 


0.4 

0.0 


0.0 

1.6 


1.4 

Saltbush, leaf, fresh, 

refrigerated 

Saltbush, leaf, 

fresh 

Fresh leaves of Atriplex 



nummularia 

111 


3.6 

0.3 


0.0 

0.1 


0.0 

River mint, leaf, fresh, 

refrigerated 

River mint, leaf, 

fresh 

Fresh leaf of Mentha 



australis 

130 


4.1 

0.0 


0.0 

0.6 


0.5 

Sea Parsley, leaf, fresh, 

refrigerated 

Sea Parsley, leaf, 

fresh 

Fresh leaf of Apium 



prostatum 

110 


2.5 

0.3 


0.0 

1.5 


1.4 

Olida, leaf, dried, ground  Olida, leaf, dried, 

ground 

Dried ground leaf of 



Eucalyptus olida 

784 


9.4 

4.8 


0.9 

4.4 


4.1 

 



Implications 

Issues arising: 

-  Nomenclature – The importance of employing consistent names for these indigenous food 

products which, in some cases runs counter to Aboriginal practice, regional preference or 

popular argot cannot be emphasised enough. The industry and associated interested parties 

need to recognise that, if the products are to find use in the broader culinary context, many of 

the people using them will have no familiarity with, or even interest in the historical and 

cultural context. This is a watershed concept – the industry needs to decide collectively if we 

aspire to turn these products into our Australian contribution to the international food 

ingredient market, or if we prefer to try to retain them in a cultural context – special, local, 

historical, regional etc – with associated layers of meaning and investment. 

-  Further Work – While the 14 species added in the present exercise, together with the five 

species already accessible to the calculator represent the largest portion of the commercially 

available native food products, there remain a few obvious examples of products demanding 

inclusion in the near future. Of these, Muntries (Kunzea pomifera fruit) are the most 

important, with commercial production (albeit small) already occurring in South Australia. It 

is likely that a repeat of the current exercise at some time within the next five years would be 

easily justified. 

-  Access and use of the NPC- At the completion of this project, it is important to alert potential 

manufacturers and value adders to the availability of this information online, and within the 

Food Standards Code of Australia. The most effective means available to alert formulators to 

the new information are the FSANZ website and other publications, the ANFIL website and 

regular bulletins, and in other food industry publications. The latter media present 

opportunities for ANFIL to develop a press release announcing both the availability of the data 

– and the special flavour and nutritional properties of the products themselves.  



 

Recommendations 

It is to be hoped that FSANZ, RIRDC and ANFIL will all undertake some coordinated publicity effort 

to inform the industry (producers, marketers, manufacturers, chefs researchers and educators) that the 

new data is available online, it is reliable and can be used immediately to calculate nutritional panels 

for any products containing these fourteen (and the five already listed) indigenous foods. 


 



Appendices 



Appendix 1: Submissions to FSANZ 

The following dossier consolidates all the laboratory output from NMI, together with production, 

product format, sampling source and technique for each of the subject species. 

1. Anise Myrtle 

 

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 

Formerly Aniseed myrtle 



Botanical Name 

Syzygium anisatum, formerly  Anetholea anisata (Vickery) Peter G 

Wilson (formerly Backhousia anisata

Commentary on nomenclature 

Present name chosen to avoid perceived confusion with aniseed 

(Apiaceae), and seed spice products 

Producer/manufacturer: 

Australian Rainforest Products 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

Lismore district, orchard grown 

Clone, variety or selection, if 

any: 


N/A 

Batch preparation (post harvest)  Leaf is dried, stripped from twigs, milled to order. 

Sampling method: 

 

Subsample ex commercial batch 210239 



Date of harvest 

18/5/2011 

Sampling date: 

17 October 2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

17 October 2011 

 

 


 

10 


 

 

11 


 

 

12 


2. Bush Tomato 

 

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 

Akudjera, Akudjura, Desert Raisin, Kutjera  



Botanical Name 

Solanum centrale 

Commentary on nomenclature 

Present name one of several, but preferred as the indigenous 

alternative is spelled in a variety of ways and may mislead. 

Producer/manufacturer: 

Outback Pride 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

Nappery Station,  NT 

Clone, variety or selection, if 

any: 

N/A 


Batch preparation (post harvest)  Sun dried, hand harvested fruits. 

Sampling method: 

 

Subsample ex commercial pack 



Date of harvest 

Sept 2011 

Sampling date: 

20 October 2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

20 October 2011 

 


 

13 


 

14 


 

 

15 


 

 

16 


 

3. Desert Lime 

 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

Desert Lime 

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 


Botanical Name 



Citrus glauca 

Commentary on nomenclature 

Producer/manufacturer: 



Australian Desert Limes 

90 Stinson Lane, Roma Qld. 4455 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

Producer’s property, Roma, Qld 

Clone, variety or selection, if 

any: 

-  


Batch preparation (post harvest)  Brush cleaned, size graded, frozen and stored at -21° 

Sampling method: 

 

 

Sub sample from standard batch 



Date of harvest 

November 2010 

Sampling date: 

18/10/11 

Date of sample despatch:  

18/10/11 



 

17 


 

 

18 


 

4. Fingerlimes 

 

 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

Fingerlimes 

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 

Citrus caviar 



Botanical Name 

Citrus australasica 

Commentary on nomenclature 

Formerly Microcitrus australasica 

Producer/manufacturer: 

Wild Fingerlimes 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

Byron Bay district, orchard grown 

Clone, variety or selection, if 

any: 


Combined sample 2 varieties: Rainforest Pearl, Emerald 

Batch preparation (post harvest)  Frozen immediately after harvest. 

Sampling method 

 

Subsample ex commercial stock 



Date of harvest 

April - May 2011 

Sampling date: 

13 October 2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

13 October 2011 

 


 

19 


 

 

20 


 

 

21 


 

 

22 


 

5. Kakadu Plum 

 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

Kakadu Plum:  

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 

Referred to in FSANZ NUTTAB as ‘Billy Goat Plum’; Gubinge 



Botanical Name 

Terminalia ferdinandiana 

Commentary on nomenclature 

 

Producer/manufacturer: 



TBC 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

 

Clone, variety or selection, if 



any: 

N/A 


Batch preparation (post harvest)  Deseeded, pureed and frozen 

Sampling method: 

 

 

Sample from commercial pack 



Date of harvest 

April 2011 

Sampling date: 

20 October 2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

20 October 2011 

 


 

23 


 

 

24 


 

 

25 


6. Lemon Aspen  

 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

Lemon Aspen – frozen puree 

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 



Botanical Name 



Acronicia acidula/subarosa 

Commentary on nomenclature 

Producer/manufacturer: 



Rainforest Bounty 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

Atherton Tableland;  

Clone, variety or selection, if 

any: 


N/A 

Batch preparation (post harvest)  De stalked, then washed in 10% vinegar solution before juicing 

with a medium filter and freezing juice in sterilised plastic bottles 

Sampling method: 

 

 

Subsample ex commercial batch  



Date of harvest 

21/4/2011 

Sampling date: 

18 October 2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

18 October 2011 

 


 

26 


 

27 


 

28 


 

 

29 


 

7. Lemon Myrtle 

 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

Lemon myrtle  

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 



Botanical Name 



Backhousia citriodora 

Commentary on nomenclature 

Producer/manufacturer: 



Australian Rainforest Products 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

Lismore district; orchard grown 

Clone, variety or selection, if 

any: 


N/A 

Batch preparation (post harvest)  Leaf  separated from twig, dried, hammer milled. 

Sampling method: 

 

Subsample from batch #110266 



Date of harvest 

22/9/2011 

Sampling date: 

17/10/2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

17/10/2011 

 


 

30 


 

31 


 

32 


 

 

33 


8. Olida  

 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

Olida: Dried, milled leaf 

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 

Strawberry Gum, Forest Berry Herb 



Botanical Name 

Eucalyptus olida 

Commentary on nomenclature 

Olida is preferred as there has been some confusion regarding the 

references to berries in the alternatives. Some producers name the 

product simply by the botanical name, though this may be 

somewhat clumsy. 

Producer/manufacturer: 

Tarnuk Bushfoods 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

Korumburra, Victoria 

Clone, variety or selection, if 

any: 


n/a 

Batch preparation (post harvest)  Dried leaf, ground in hammer mill 

Sampling method: 

 

 



Subsample from commercial batch 

Date of harvest 

7/9/11 

Sampling date: 



19/9/11 

Date of sample despatch:  

10/10/11 


 

34 


 

 

35 


 

 

36 


 

 

37 


9. Sea Parsley 

 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

Sea Parsley- Fresh Leaf 

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 



Botanical Name 



Apium prostratum 

Commentary on nomenclature 

 

Producer/manufacturer: 



Outback Pride 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

 

Clone, variety or selection, if 



any: 

N/A 


Batch preparation (post harvest)  Chill pack 

Sampling method: 

 

 

Subsample ex commercial pack 



Date of harvest 

19/10/2011 

Sampling date: 

19 October 2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

20 October 2011 

 


 

38 


 

 

39 


 

 

40 


 

 

41 


 

10. Tasmannia Pepperberry  

 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

Tasmannia pepperberry 

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 

Mountain Pepperberry, Pepperberry, Native pepper berry 



Botanical Name 

Tasmannia lanceolata 

Commentary on nomenclature 

Prefer to include ‘berry’ in name to distinguish from the leaf 

product. 

Producer/manufacturer: 

Diemen Pepper Products 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

NW Tasmania (Parrawe district) 

Clone, variety or selection, if 

any: 


Consolidated wild crafted 

Batch preparation (post harvest)  Berries dried (to 45°C) and cleaned. 

Sampling method: 

 

 



Subsample from Batch 051200 

Date of harvest 

April 2011 

Sampling date: 

October 2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

12/10/2011 


 

42 


 

 

43 


 

 

44 


 

 

45 


 

11. Tasmannia Pepperleaf 

 

 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

Tasmannia pepperleaf 

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 

-Mountain pepper, mountain pepper leaf, native pepper leaf. 



Botanical Name 

Tasmannia lanceolata 

Commentary on nomenclature 

Producer/manufacturer: 



Diemen Pepper Products 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

NW Tasmania: Parrawe district 

Clone, variety or selection, if 

any: 


N/A 

Batch preparation (post harvest)  Leaf is dried, stripped from twigs, milled to order. 

Sampling method: 

 

 



Subsample ex commercial batch 100438 

Date of harvest 

June 2011 

Sampling date: 

October 2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

12 October 2011 

 

 



 

46 


 

 

47 


 

 

48 


 

 

49 


 

12. Rivermint 

 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

River mint 

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 

Native Mint 



Botanical Name 

Mentha australis 

Commentary on nomenclature 

 

Producer/manufacturer: 



Outback Pride 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

 

Clone, variety or selection, if 



any: 

N/A 


Batch preparation (post harvest)  Chill pack 

Sampling method: 

 

 

Subsample ex commercial pack 



Date of harvest 

19/10/2011 

Sampling date: 

19 October 2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

20 October 2011 

 


 

50 


 

 

51 


 

 

52 


13. Saltbush 

 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

Saltbush:  

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 

 

Botanical Name 



Atriplex nummularia 

Commentary on nomenclature 

 

Producer/manufacturer: 



Outback Pride 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

 

Clone, variety or selection, if 



any: 

N/A 


Batch preparation (post harvest)  Chill pack 

Sampling method: 

 

 

Subsample ex commercial pack 



Date of harvest 

19/10/2011 

Sampling date: 

19 October 2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

20 October 2011 

 


 

53 


 

 

54 


 

 

55 


 

14. Satinash 

 

Product Name  

(commercial preference) 

Satinash 

Alternative names, synonyms, if 

any. 

Rain cherry, Small leaf Lilli Pilli 



Botanical Name 

Syzygium fibrosum 

Commentary on nomenclature 

‘Rain cherry’ is the marketing ‘brand’ used by this producer. 

Producer/manufacturer: 

Galeru Pty Ltd 

Sample location (origin/ 

production area) 

Cooroy, Qld 

Clone, variety or selection, if 

any: 

-  


Batch preparation (post harvest)  Whole frozen fruit thawed under refrigeration; thawed fruit 

processed by brush-finisher to remove seed; fruit pulp then 

packaged and frozen 

Sampling method: 

 

 

1150kg of whole satinash fruit was processed (de-seeded) in a 



single batch on 15 Mar 2010; the sample was taken from a random 

carton of this product 

Date of harvest 

3 Jan 2008 

Sampling date: 

11 Nov 2011 

Date of sample despatch:  

11 Nov 2011 

 


 

56 


 

 

57 


 

 

58 


 

 


 

59 


APPENDIX 2: Analytical Methods 

1. Trace Elements VL 247 Vers. 9.0 

 

Analysis Description  

Determination of trace elements in food and biota by inductively 

coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively 

coupled atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).  

Matrix / Matrices  

Food and biota  



Reference Method(s)  

1. USEPA Method 6010B & 6020  

2. NMI NSW Method 2.46  

Limit of Reporting (LOR)  

0.01-0.5 mg/kg for most metals  

0.2-2 mg/kg for sodium, potassium, sulfur, phosphorous, iron, 

calcium, magnesium  



NATA Accredited  

Yes  


Preparation & procedure  

Sample is homogenised and a sub-sample (0.2-0.5g) is digested 

with re-distilled nitric acid on a DigiPrep block for one hour until 

vigorous reaction is complete. Samples are then transferred to a 

Milestone microwave to be further digested. After making up to 

appropriate volume with Milli-Q (high purity) water, the digest is 

analysed for trace elements using ICP-MS and / or ICP-OES.  

Comments, limitations or 

known interferences  

In ICP-MS some elements are prone to interferences from 

molecular ions, doubly charged ions and isotopes of similar mass. 

The analysis of matrices containing high concentrations of salts or 

organic compounds may not be possible for some elements. In 

some cases the ICP-OES may be an alternative.  

Spectral interferences are common in ICP-OES due to many 

excitation lines generated by the plasma.  



Equipment used  

ICP-MS: Agilent 7500CE  

ICP-OES: Optima 4300DV  

QA Protocols per batch  

One blank every 20 samples with a minimum of 2 blanks per batch  

One sample reference material (SRM) every batch (if available)  

One sample spike and one blank spike every 20 samples  

One sample every 10 samples to be analysed in duplicate  

Mass of Sample required  

10g  


Comments  

 


 

60 


 

 

2. Determination of Ash: VL 286 Vers. 5.1 

 

Analysis Description  

Determination of ash in food.  

Matrix / Matrices  

Processed and unprocessed food and beverages.  



Reference Method(s)  

AOAC 16


th 

Edn. 1995, 923.03 and 900.02  



Limit of Reporting (LOR)  

0.1g/100g or 0.1g/100ml  



NATA Accredited  

Yes  


Preparation & procedure  

Sample must be homogenous. Weigh an appropriate weight of 

sample into a prepared weighed dish, beaker or crucible. Disperse 

sample on bottom of container, remove excess moisture on a water 

bath. Transfer container to muffle furnace and slowly heat to 525ºC 

± 25ºC until all organic matter is destroyed. It may be necessary to 

dissolve salts in water to allow destruction of occluded carbon 

particles. Weigh container and ash. Calculate ash content.  



Comments, limitations or 

known interferences  

Samples high in sugar swell when heated and may exude from 

container. If sample ignites particulate matter may be lost with 

smoke.  


Equipment used  

Muffle furnace, weighing apparatus. Platinum crucibles are the most 

suitable containers for the analysis.  

QA Protocols per batch  

One control (flour sample) per batch At least one duplicate per 

batch  

Mass of Sample required  

10 grams  



Comments  

If ashing is incomplete high results can be obtained. Sulphated ash 

can be obtained by adding a few drops of sulphuric acid prior to 

ashing.  

 


 

61 


3. Fatty Acids VL 289 Vers. 7.0 

 

Analysis Description  

Fatty Acid Profile – including trans fatty acids  

Matrix / Matrices  

Foods  


Reference Method(s)  

Bligh & Dwyer, “A Rapid Method of Total Lipid Extraction and 

Purification”, Can.J. Biochem. Physiol., 37, 911-917  

Badings & Dejong (1983). J. Chrom., 279, 493-506.  

McCance & Widdowson (1991). The Composition of Foods. 5

th 


Ed, 

p 9.  


Limit of Reporting (LOR)  

FAME’s 0.1g/100g  



NATA Accredited  

Yes  


Preparation & procedure  

Preparation:  

The sample is homogenised and a sub sample taken (usually 1 to 10g, 

depending on sample type).  

Fat is extracted from the sample using either Chloroform/Methanol or 

Petroleum ether/iso-propyl alcohol. The extract is evaporated under 

nitrogen.  

A minimum extracted mass of 0.2g fat is required.  

The extracted fat is esterified using a methanolic sodium methoxide 

solution and treatment with sulphuric acid in methanol. The solution is 

neutralised and re-extracted using n-hexane. The hexane layer is 

removed, dried using anhydrous sodium sulphate and made to volume, 

with hexane.  



Determination:  

The relative proportion of each fatty acid methyl ester in the prepared 

sample is determined using gas chromatography with flame ionisation 

detection. Identification of the individual fatty acids is made by retention 

time against a standard of known fatty acid methyl esters including both 

cis and trans isomers. The amount of Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) 

can be also determined from the FAME’s chromatogram.  

Calculation:  

Integration and calculation of proportional methyl ester concentrations 

is made using instrument software.  

 

CLA is quantitated using a six point external standard 



calibration. CLA is usually expressed as mg CLA/g fat.

 

Comments, limitations or 



known interferences  

The results obtained are proportional only, as a percentage (or g/100g) 

of the FAME’s present in the fat extracted from the sample. If a FAME 

is required to be determined as a proportion of the total sample then a 

total fat determination of the sample is also required. For most foods 

FAMES comprise over 95% of the total fat determined using standard 

mojonnier or soxhlet fat methods.  

The FAMES reported range from C4 (Butyric acid) to C24:1 chain 

lengths.  

Trans fatty acids are also determined using this method.  



Equipment used  

Vials and other glassware.  

Balance, Dionex ASE 200 and Dionex SE 500 Nitrogen gas 

evaporation manifold  

Gas Chromatograph equipped with a Flame Ionisation Detector.  

Software for interpretation/ calculation of results.  



QA Protocols per batch  

1 control plant oil and 1 control fat are run with each batch.  

Minimum of 1 duplicate analysis per batch – maximum batch size; 19 

samples.  



Mass of Sample required  

10g  


Comments  

 

62 


4. Common Sugars: VL 295 Vers. 7.0 

 

 



Analysis Description  

Determination of common Sugars in Foods  



Matrix / Matrices  

Foods  


Reference Method(s)  

AOAC 13


th 

Ed. 31.138-31.142  



Limit of Reporting (LOR)  

0.2 g/100g with refractive index detector.  

0.05 g/100g with ELSD detector.  

NATA Accredited  

Yes  


Preparation & procedure  

Preparation:  

Sample is homogenised and a sub sample is accurately weighed. 

Sugars are extracted with 25 ml water at 60

o

c for 30 minutes.  



The extract is clarified with 25 ml acetonitrile and filtered through a 

0.45um filter into a 2ml vial, suitable for HPLC.  



Determination for common sugars:  

Filtered solution is analysed by HPLC using amino column with an 

acetonitrile/water mobile phase containing salt and refractive index 

detection. Quantitation is made against a standard solution 

containing known amounts of fructose, glucose, sucrose, maltose 

and lactose.  



Determination for low level sugars:  

Filtered solution is analysed by HPLC using carbohydrate ES 

column with an acetonitrile/water mobile phase and evaporative 

light scattering detector (ELSD). Quantitation is made against a 

standard solution containing known amounts of fructose, glucose, 

sucrose, maltose and lactose.  



Calculation:  

Result calculation is performed by HPLC software and a report 

generated.  

Comments, limitations or 

known interferences  

Sorbitol, galactose and other sugar alcohols may interfere with 

glucose or other sugars. When this occurs the glucose is 

determined using different mobile phase or separately using a Bio-

Rad HPX column.  

The method uncertainty is relatively high at levels approaching the 

Limit of Reporting (0.2g/100g).  

Equipment used  

Flasks and glassware  

Balance  

Blender  

HPLC with RI or ELSD Detection and appropriate column(s)  

Software to perform integration and calculation of results  



QA Protocols per batch  

1 duplicate each batch (up to 15 samples usually)  

A standard is run every 5 samples  

A control reference is run each batch  

A recovery test in every batch  

Mass of Sample required  

15 g per sample, however more sample would be required for QA.  

 


 

63 


5. Moisture: VL 298 Vers. 6.2 

 

 



Analysis Description  

Moisture / Total Solids 



Matrix / Matrices  

Food  


Reference Method(s)  

AOAC 16


th 

Ed. 934.06, 964.22, AS2300.1.1  



Limit of Reporting (LOR)  

0.2g/100g  



NATA Accredited  

Yes  


Preparation & procedure  

Samples are homogenised.  

Moisture determination is made, according to sample matrix type, 

using either, sand and vacuum drying (Method A) or no sand and 

conventional drying (Method B).  

Method A (Using Sand): 

A moisture dish with sand, lid and glass rod is oven dried at 102

o



and cooled before all dried components are weighed together to the 



nearest 0.1mg.  

2 to 5 gram of sample is weighed, to nearest 0.1mg, into the 

moisture dish. Water is added to the dish to aid mixing of the 

sample and sand. The moisture dish is placed on a steam bath until 

visible dryness of the sand/sample mix is achieved.  

The dish and components are placed in a vacuum oven and dried 

under vacuum (approx. 5kpa) at between 70 and 100

o

c, depending 



on sugar content of the sample. Drying time is a minimum of 4 

hours depending on the sample matrix. After the required initial 

drying period the moisture dish and components are removed, 

cooled, re-weighed and returned for a further 1 hour drying. The 

weighing and drying process is repeated until constant weight is 

obtained.  



Calculation (Method A):  

Subtract the mass of the dish (plus components) from the mass of 

dried sample and dish (plus components). Divide the figure 

obtained by the sample mass and multiply by 100 to obtain a result 

as % moisture or g/100g.  

Method B (Without Sand) 

A moisture dish and lid is oven at 102

o

C dried and cooled. The 



dried components are weighed together to the nearest 0.1mg.  

A portion of sample (2 to 5 grams) is weighed, to nearest 0.1mg, 

into the dish.  

The sample in the dish is then placed in a conventional oven at 

102

o

C for a minimum of 4 hours depending on the sample matrix.  



The dish and lid are then removed, cooled, re-weighed and 

returned for a further 1 hour drying. The weighing and drying 

process is repeated until a constant weight is obtained.  

Calculation (Method B):  

Subtract the mass of the dish (plus lid) from the mass of dried 

sample and dish (plus lid). Divide the figure obtained by the sample 

mass and multiply by 100 to obtain a result as % moisture or 

g/100g.  

Comments, limitations or 

known interferences  

These are internationally recognised techniques providing 

consistency and comparability with results obtained by laboratories 

worldwide. It is recognised that these techniques do not necessarily 

provide a true reflection of the total moisture contained in a sample.  

No real interferences in food samples.  



 

64 


 6. Fat by Mojonnier: VL 302 Vers. 7.0 

 

 



Analysis Description  

Fat Determination in non-dairy samples by Mojonnier  



Matrix / Matrices  

Foods  


Reference Method(s)  

AOAC 16th Edition 954.02,948.15,922.08  



Limit of Reporting (LOR)  

0.2g/ 100g  



NATA Accredited  

Yes  


Preparation & procedure  

Preparation & Procedure:  

Samples are homogenised and a sub sample (approx. 2g) is 

accurately weighed into a beaker.  

10ml of approx. 10% hydrochloric acid is added and the mixture is 

heated at 80 

C 


 

  

 



   

 

 



The mixture is cooled and transferred quantitatively to a Mojonnier 

tube. 10ml of ethanol is added and the fat is extracted by shaking 

for 1 minute with 25ml of diethyl ether and a further minute with 

each of 25ml of petroleum ether and 50ml petroleum and diethyl 

ether mix (The petroleum and diethyl ether mix extract is conducted 

twice). After each solvent addition, and subsequent shaking, the 

organic layer is decanted from the Mojonnier tube into a pre-

weighed glass dish. Once all extractions are complete the organic 

extract in the glass dish is evaporated.  

The dish is then dried in an oven at 102

  

 

 



  

achieved.  



Calculation: % Fat = Weight of dish – Weight of dish X 100  

Weight of sample  



Comments, limitations or 

known interferences  

If hydrolysis is incomplete then a full recovery may not be obtained.  

Foods high in sugar should be pretreated to remove sugar prior to 

hydrolysis.  



Equipment used  

Convection oven calibrated at 102

C. 

 

Analytical balance capable of weighing to 0.0001 gram  



Mojonnier tubes  

Glass dishes  

10 gram of sample required.  

QA Protocols per batch  

1 Duplicate per batch, maximum batch size is 10 samples.  



Mass of Sample required  

10g per sample, however more samples would be required for QA.  

 

 


Phone:   

02 6271 4100

Fax:  

02 6271 4199



Bookshop:  

1300 634 313

Email:  rirdc@rirdc.gov.au

Postal Address:   PO Box 4776,  

Kingston ACT 2604

Street Address:   Level 2, 15 National Circuit,  

Barton ACT 2600

 

 



www.rirdc.gov.au

Nutritional Data for  

Australian Native Foods

By Chris Read

Pub. No. 12/099

This report details the analysis of a key group of 14 native 

food species for their nutritional properties, in particular 

those which are reported in the nutritional panels found on 

most manufactured products. 

Through liaison with Food Standards Australia and New 

Zealand (FSANZ), this data has been incorporated into the 

database employed by the online calculator which is used by 

manufacturers to prepare these panels for their labelling.

RIRDC is a partnership between government and industry 

to invest in R&D for more productive and sustainable rural 

industries. We invest in new and emerging rural industries, a 

suite of established rural industries and national rural issues.

Most of the information we produce can be downloaded for 

free or purchased from our website .

RIRDC books can also be purchased by phoning  



1300 634 313 for a local call fee.

Document Outline

  • Foreword
  • About the Author
  • Acknowledgments
  • Abbreviations
  • Executive Summary
    • What the report is about
    • Who is the report targeted at?
    • Where are the relevant industries located in Australia?
    • Background
    • Aims/objectives
    • Methods used
    • Results/key findings
    • Implications for relevant stakeholders
    •  The native food industry can take confidence that the native produce they grow and supply can be incorporated into recipes for which nutritional panel can be generated to satisfy the Food Standards Authority
    •  Policy makers can recognise that Australian native foods, products and cuisine are part of the normal dietary offering, and need support at a policy level in order that they may be traded both within Australia, and in export markets.
    • Recommendations
  • Introduction
  • Objectives
  • Methodology
    • Sampling Protocol
    • Analytical Methods
    • Data Presentation
  • Results
  • Implications
  • Recommendations
  • Appendices
    • Appendix 1: Submissions to FSANZ
      • 1. Anise Myrtle
      • 2. Bush Tomato
      • 3. Desert Lime
      • 4. Fingerlimes
      • 5. Kakadu Plum
      • 6. Lemon Aspen
      • 7. Lemon Myrtle
      • 8. Olida
      • 9. Sea Parsley
      • 10. Tasmannia Pepperberry
      • 11. Tasmannia Pepperleaf
      • 12. Rivermint
      • 13. Saltbush
      • 14. Satinash
    • APPENDIX 2: Analytical Methods
      • 1. Trace Elements VL 247 Vers. 9.0
      • 2. Determination of Ash: VL 286 Vers. 5.1
      • 3. Fatty Acids VL 289 Vers. 7.0
      • 4. Common Sugars: VL 295 Vers. 7.0
      • 5. Moisture: VL 298 Vers. 6.2
      • 6. Fat by Mojonnier: VL 302 Vers. 7.0



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   2


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə