O r I g I n a L a r t I c L e



Yüklə 406.12 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü406.12 Kb.
  1   2   3

O R I G I N A L

A R T I C L E

Life-history characters and phylogeny are

correlated with extinction risk in the

Australian angiosperms

A. Sjo¨stro¨m

1

  and C. L. Gross



2

1



School of Mathematics, Statistics and

Computing Science and

2

Ecosystem



Management, School of Environmental

Sciences and Natural Resources Management,

University of New England, Armidale, NSW,

Australia

*Correspondence: C.L. Gross, Ecosystem

Management, School of Environmental Sciences

and Natural Resources Management, University

of New England, Armidale, NSW, 2351,

Australia.

E-mail: cgross@une.edu.au

 These authors contributed equally to this work.

A B S T R A C T

Aim To determine whether life-history characters that affect population

persistence (e.g. habit and life span) and those that influence reproductive

success (e.g. sexual system and fruit type) are non-randomly correlated with

extinction risk (i.e. threat category) in the Australian flora (c. 19,000 species, of

which c. 14% is threatened). To identify patterns that present useful conservation

directions. To understand patterns of extinction risk in the Australian flora at a

broad scale.

Location Continental Australia.

Methods A country-wide exploration of four life-history characters in the

Australian flora (n

¼ 18,822 species) was undertaken using reference texts, expert

opinion, herbarium records and field work. For each character and threat-

category combination, a G-test (using a log-linear model) was performed to test

the null hypothesis that the two factors were independent in their effects on

count. A generalized linear model (GLM) with a logit link and binomial error

distribution was constructed with the proportion of taxa in each extinction risk

category as the response variable and the habit, sex and fruit-type characters as

explanatory terms. In a separate approach, we investigated patterns across the

threat categories of non-endangered extant, endangered, and extinct using a

multinomial model. We examined whether or not species-poor genera were more

likely to contain threatened or extinct species than species-rich genera. A GLM

with a binomial error distribution and logit link function was constructed to

obtain a weighted regression on the proportion of species listed as extinct or

endangered within a genus versus the log of the size of the genus. We also used a

supertree analysis and character tracing to investigate the role of phylogeny on

extinction risk.

Results We found that the Australian flora is primarily composed of bisexual

shrubs with dry-dehiscent fruits. Dioecious breeding systems (separate female and

male flowers on separate plants) in many floras are the predominant unisexual

system, but in Australia there are unexpectedly high levels of monoecy (separate

female and male flowers on the same plant). Within the extinct data set of

31 species we detected a significant departure from that expected for habit but not

for life span, sexual system or fruit type. There are significantly fewer trees on the

extinct list than expected. This may reflect the greater resilience of trees than of

other growth habits to extinction processes as well as the observation time-frame.

Within the endangered data set of 450 species we found significant differences in

the representation of the observed characters from that expected within sex

systems and fruit types. We show that, depending on the life form, unisexual

breeding systems can be significantly and positively associated with endangered

species compared with non-threatened species. For example, there are more

Journal of Biogeography (J. Biogeogr.) (2006) 33, 271–290

ª 2006 The Authors

www.blackwellpublishing.com/jbi

271


Journal compilation

ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

doi:10.1111/j.1365-2699.2005.01393.x


I N T R O D U C T I O N

There are many different types of events that can increase

extinction risks in species; for example, fragmentation has

multiple effects on ecosystems (Laurance et al., 2002) and is a

key factor worldwide that can prematurely halt population

persistence. However, it is not always that a species was just in

the wrong place at the wrong time – even related species in the

same landscape can differ in their resilience to perturbations

(e.g. Bertya ingramii versus B. rosmarinifolia, Scott & Gross,

2004). Are there inherent properties in species that predispose

them to vulnerability or resilience? A broad approach to

address this question is to determine whether or not there are

specific traits clustered with the state of extinction risk.

Increasingly this approach is being used to evaluate the

properties of rarity and speciosity geographically or within

lineages (e.g. Hegde & Ellstrand, 1999; Rey Benayas et al.,

1999; Edwards & Westoby, 2000; Murray et al., 2002a,b;

Golding & Hurter, 2003) in an attempt to forecast the types of

species that may be vulnerable to extinction. The evolutionary

significance of trait clustering can also be examined using

correlation tests of life-history characters against ecological

parameters (e.g. Chazdon et al., 2003). However, seldom is

there a comprehensive data set that covers whole continents

(see later). Consequently an overall appraisal of extinction risk

is mostly lacking at continental scales. In most floras, for

example, so little is known about the distribution of life-

history characters on a continental scale that partial data sets

(e.g. a clade, Murray et al., 2002a) are used instead, with the

added power of phylogenetic analyses in some cases (e.g.

Murray et al., 2002b; Murray & Lepschi, 2004). Biogeographi-

cal attributes such as habitat type may also be important

predictors of increased extinction risk; however, our initial

focus is at the Australia-wide scale and on whether or not there

are life-history attributes correlated with increased extinction

risks.

Perhaps the predominance of a life-history character (e.g.



habit) is skewed in abundance in both threatened species and

the greater population – it is difficult to resolve when data on

the greater population are unavailable. The Australian vascular

flora presents a challenge in this area: there are at least 19,000

vascular species yet the abundance and distribution of

fundamental life-history characters, such as those that affect

population persistence (e.g. habit and life span) and those that

influence reproductive success (e.g. sexual system and fruit

type), are poorly known on a continental basis. Such data, if

available, could be used to examine the general occurrence of

patterns of rarity in the flora. There is certainly a need for a

broad approach as the estimate for the number of threatened

vascular plants in Australia is alarmingly high at 14.4% (Walter

& Gillett, 1998).

Establishing the abundance and distribution of life-history

characters for an entire flora is a challenge, yet knowledge of

these properties at such a broad and inclusive scale could be a

powerful tool for conservation planning. As a starting point we

undertook a study of the distribution of four life-history

characters that we consider fundamental to all species. These

characters were habit, life span, sex system and fruit type, and

they were examined for Australian recently extinct and

endangered angiosperms and for the Australian flora as a

whole. Habit (i.e. life form) has been linked to increased

extinction risk in several floras (Robinson et al., 1994; Turner

et al., 1996; Hegde & Ellstrand, 1999; Rogers & Walker, 2002)

and it is intricately linked with life span (Garcia, 2003). Sex

system can also be associated with elevated extinction risks,

particularly for unisexual species. For example, Vamosi &

Vamosi (2005) found that dioecious species experience higher

extinction rates and (or) lower speciation rates compared with

non-dioecious sister groups. They also found that the woody

growth habit is probably a contributing factor to the higher

incidence of dioecious species being at risk of extinction but

that the character was not solely responsible for the pattern.

Certain fruit types can be non-randomly associated with rare

species (Hegde & Ellstrand, 1999) too, and as fruit type can be

correlated with sex system and habit (reviewed in Gross, 2005)

fundamental life-history characters such as habit, life span, sex

system and fruit type should not be examined in isolation from

each other.

We use the information on life-history characters to describe

first the composition of the Australian flora and then patterns

in trait distribution. Next we determine the utility of

taxon richness as a predictor of extinction (see Schwartz &

monoecious species than expected by chance among the tree species listed as

endangered but fewer among the herbaceous life forms. Threat category was

found to be non-randomly clustered in some clades.

Main conclusions Life-history characters in certain combinations are predictive

of extinction risk. Phylogeny is also an important component of extinction risk.

We suggest that specific life-history characters could be used for conservation

planning and as an early warning sign for detecting vulnerability in lists of species.

Keywords

Australia, correlated evolution, extinction risk, flora, fruit types, genus size, life-

history characters, phylogenetic analyses, sex systems.

A. Sjo¨stro¨m and C. L. Gross

272

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290



ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Simberloff, 2001). Finally we compare our results for the

Australian continent with other regions and provide informa-

tion that could be incorporated into conservation planning.

M A T E R I A L A N D M E T H O D S

The number of extant, endangered and extinct flora

in Australia

Extant flora

To begin we compiled a list of the flowering plant families for

Australia (n

¼ 222 families) and determined the number of

species in each family by consulting Hnatiuk (1990), and,

when it became available, the online version, the Australian

Plant Name Index: http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/apni. We

checked the number of species and revised the counts when

more recent treatments became available, for example from the

Flora of Australia volumes, regional floras, or other taxonomic

treatments. Family names were ultimately delineated following

the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification (Stevens, 2001

onwards).

Endangered and extinct flora

There is much discussion about the membership and

robustness of threatened species lists (Akcakaya et al., 2000;

Burgman, 2002; Possingham et al., 2002; Keith & Burgman,

2004). Our list of extinct and endangered species was derived

from the schedules within the Environmental Protection and

Biodiversity Act 1999 (EPBC Act) as of November 2003.*

This group of species was considered by us to represent

species most likely to be extinct or to go extinct in the next

10–20 years. We refer to these species as rare because they

variously occur within the seven forms of rarity as proposed

by Rabinowitz (1981). There are many thousands more

species considered as rare in threatened species classifications

in Australia (e.g. Briggs & Leigh, 1996), but these are

generally not considered to be at a high risk of extinction in

the next 10 years and are not considered separately in this

study.


To verify the accuracy of Australian taxa listed as presumed

extinct, we sought collection and taxonomic information for

61 taxa. In particular, an attempt was made to find the

protologue, additional descriptive material, and the most

recent sighting or collection date for each taxon presumed

extinct. Only flowering species were considered.

We then only listed a species as extinct if (1) it was

taxonomically distinct (if the species is known only from a

single specimen, it was placed in the ‘known only from the

type’ category and not considered further), (2) no collections

or sightings of the species are known within the last 50 years,

and (3) the species is not extant outside Australia.

No additional checking was performed on the validity of

membership on the endangered list except to exclude non-

vascular taxa and taxa below the species level or to revise a

name according to the latest systematic information.

Life-history characters

In order to develop a set of testable hypotheses for investi-

gating the significance of the trends observed within the extinct

and endangered flora, against the extant flora as a whole, we

assayed four life-history characters for 31 extinct species, 450

endangered species and for the Australian angiosperms, which

totalled 18,821 species (including 1997 introduced species).

We only included taxa at the species level. We looked at four

life-history characters for each family: habit, life span, sex

system and fruit type. Habit (i.e. life form) was categorized as

herb, vine, liane, shrub, or tree. Life span was categorized as

either short-lived (i.e. annuals or biennials) or long-lived

(perennials). Sex system was categorized as hermaphroditic

(i.e. all flowers bisexual on a plant), dioecious (i.e. female and

male flowers found on separate individuals and includes

andro- and gynodioecious species), or monoecious (i.e. female

and male flowers found as separate flowers on the same

individual and includes andro- and gynomonoecious and

polygamomonoecious species). Fruit type was categorized as

dry-indehiscent (including achene, caryopsis, nut, nutlet,

samara, some schizocarps, utricle, and some capsules), dry-

dehiscent (including most capsules, stroboli, follicles, legume,

mericarp, saliqua, most schizocarps, and loments), or fleshy

(including berry, drupe, gyconium, pome, pseudocarp, spathe,

synangium, syncarp, viviparous seedlings, pipo, and pyrene).

When all species within a family shared the same combi-

nation of life-history characters (see below), the data were

tallied at the family level for the number of species known to

occur in the family. For example, if all species within a family

were hermaphroditic, annual, herbs with capsules, the char-

acter data were tallied along with a count for the number of

species in the family and individual species were not looked at

in detail. For families where categories varied within a life-

history character (e.g. some species were hermaphroditic and

other were dioecious), we looked at the life-history characters

at the generic level and if these were consistent we tallied them;

otherwise, we examined life-history characters for each indi-

vidual species. To determine which category within a character

a species exhibited, we sourced the information in the first

instance either from the Flora of Australia volumes, or from

Morley & Toelken (1983), or from regional botanical reference

texts (a list is available from the authors). If we were not able

to obtain the information from these sources, we gathered and

queried information from published taxonomic treatments,

researchers, protologues or herbarium specimens. For some

species we were unable to determine every life-history char-

acter. In these cases we omitted from the analyses that life-

history character for that species (habit data were lacking for

129 spp., life span for 135 spp., sex system for 192 spp., and

fruit type for 34 spp.).

*The current EPBC Act list is available online at http://www.deh.

gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/index.html.

Life-history characters in the Australian flora

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290

273

ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd



Statistical analyses

Life-history characters

Prior to comparative analysis of the non-endangered extant and

endangered species, introduced species were excluded. Of the

remaining species, each was coded individually according to its

life-history characters and conservation status (i.e. non-

endangered extant or endangered). Owing to the autocorrela-

tion of habit and life span, only the characters habit, sex, and fruit

type were considered. Analysis then proceeded with the follow-

ing steps. The R statistical package (Ihaka & Gentleman, 1996)

was used to obtain contingency tables of each separate character

and conservation status. For example, a table was constructed

of counts of species classified by habit (5 categories) and

conservation status (endangered or non-endangered extant).

For each character and status combination, a G-test (that used a

log-linear model) was performed to test the null hypothesis that

the two factors (i.e. individual characters and status) were

independent in their effects on count (Crawley, 2003).

Next, characters were considered together in a four-way

frequency table (i.e. all character combinations and status). To

model the data, conservation status (endangered or non-

endangered extant) was reformulated as a proportion for ease

of analysis (Crawley, 2003). A GLM (generalized linear model)

with a logit link and binomial error distribution was constructed

with the proportion of taxa as endangered as the response

variable and the habit, sex and fruit-type characters as explan-

atory terms. The saturated model consisted of the main effects,

all two-way interactions, and the three-way interaction of

explanatory terms. The saturated model was reduced by stepwise

removal of terms that reduced the Akaike Information Criterion

(AIC; Akaike, 1974).

A similar procedure was followed to compare extant species

and extinct species. As above, introduced species were

excluded from the analysis. R was used to obtain a four-way

frequency table. The response y (extinct or extant) was

reformulated as a proportion for ease of analysis. A saturated

GLM model with a logit link and binomial error distribution

was constructed with the proportion of taxa extinct as the

response variable, and the main effects, all two-way interac-

tions, and the three-way interactions as explanatory terms.

This model was reduced using the step function in R.

In a separate approach we investigated patterns across status

levels of non-endangered extant, endangered, and extinct

species using a multinomial model (Venables & Ripley, 2002)

that was fitted to the data with the response y as the

conservation status level (extinct, endangered, or non-

endangered extant) and explanatory terms as the life-history

characters. As for the GLM models, the step function in R was

used to reduce the saturated model.

Species richness

We examined whether or not species-poor genera were more

likely to contain threatened or extinct species than species-rich

genera. We excluded genera that only contained introduced

species (n

¼ 660). For each genus (n ¼ 1978), we determined

the proportion that was endangered or extinct relative to the

overall size of the genus in Australia. R was used to investigate

the influence of generic species richness on membership in the

extinct species list. A GLM with a binomial error distribution

and logit link function was constructed to obtain a weighted

regression on the proportion of extinct species within a genus

versus the log of the size of the genus. Similarly, a weighted

regression was also performed on the proportion of endan-

gered species versus the log of the size of the genus. In both

cases, the significance of the parameter values was assessed by a

deletion test in which the original model was compared with a

simpler model that was fitted with a constant (i.e. the null

model).


For both the extinct and endangered species data we

explored the relationship with rarity further by using a second

model that was constructed to include only those genera that

contained extinct species (n

¼ 26) or endangered species

(n

¼ 179), respectively. The reliability of the parameters



estimated for the latter was assessed using a bootstrap test.

The procedure followed was to construct a model that used the

original endangered proportion data as the response variable.

The explanatory term was the log of the size of the genus, and

the number of genera considered consisted of a random

sample (n

¼ 179) of all genera. A weighted regression was

performed on each of 10 000 different random samples and the

resulting parameter values compared.

We repeated the procedure above to investigate familial

speciosity and the presence of endangered or extinct species. In

particular, we excluded families that contained only intro-

duced species (n

¼ 20). For each family (n ¼ 202), we

determined the proportion of taxa that was endangered or

extinct relative to the overall size of the family in Australia. A

GLM with a binomial error distribution and logit link function

was constructed to obtain a weighted regression on the

proportion of extinct species within a family versus the log of

the size of the family. Similarly, a weighted regression was also

performed on the proportion of endangered species versus the

log of the size of the family. In both cases, the significance of

the parameter values was assessed by a deletion test in which

the original model was compared with a simpler model that

was fitted with a constant (i.e. the null model).

For both the extinct and endangered species data, a second

model was constructed by including only those families that

contained extinct species (n

¼ 16) or endangered species

(n

¼ 62), respectively. The reliability of the parameters



estimated for the latter was assessed using a bootstrap test as

described previously.

The association of rarity with phylogeny

A supertree of the Australian flowering species was too large to

work with and so three smaller trees (Asterids, Core Eudicots

and Commelinids) were constructed using the Phylomatic

database (Webb & Donoghue, 2002), an automated process

A. Sjo¨stro¨m and C. L. Gross

274

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290



ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

that builds a hypothetical tree based on a master phylogeny –

we chose the angiosperm supertree from Davies et al. (2004),

which is based on 46 source trees, as our master phylogeny.

Genera were used as terminal taxa in this analysis because of

the large number of poorly understood infra-generic lineages

and as an attempt to minimize non-independence among

related groups. Insufficient information on relationships

between or within taxa is presented as polytomies. Branch

lengths were not known for all relationships and were given

unit length. A nexus version of these trees is available on

request.

The trait, not threatened or threatened (endangered or

extinct), was traced as a binary character over each tree using

macclade


version 4.03 (Maddison & Maddison, 2001). Thus

genera containing an endangered or extinct species were given

a score of 1 while genera without an endangered or extinct

species were given a score of 0. Clustering of the trait

(phylogenetic conservatism) was examined by determining the

number of steps required for each character state (summed

cost of all changes, gains and losses) in each of the three trees.

Polytomies were set as soft to represent uncertain resolution

and so that the polytomy is resolved in the most parsimonious

way for that character. (Hard polytomies, on the other hand,

assume, for any character exhibited among a group of taxa,

that character has evolved independently for each taxon, i.e.

simultaneous speciation events.) The character state was

reshuffled among the taxa in 1000 random resolutions of each

tree. For each tree, character tracing was then used to compare

the actual number of steps with the number of steps in the

1000 trees based on randomly reshuffling the character states.

If the actual number of steps ranked within the lowest 5% of

the 1000 random resolutions, the character was considered

significantly phylogenetically clustered.

The concentrated-changes test in MacClade version 4.03

(Maddison & Maddison, 2001) was used to examine whether

observed associations among traits (e.g. rarity and genus size)

reflect phylogenetic correlations. This test examines whether

gains (0 to 1 changes in a binary character) in one character

(e.g. extinct status) are more concentrated than expected by

chance on those branches of the tree that are reconstructed to

have a particular distribution of state in the second character

(e.g. genus size). This test can only be used on resolved trees

(i.e. without polytomies), and thus 10 randomly resolved

trees were used so that a range of probabilities could be

reported. Threat status was traced against genus size

[1

¼ small (1–2 species) 0 ¼ or not small] and in a separate



set of analyses against sex systems (unisexual or bisexual) and

against fruit type.

R E S U L T S

Based on the data we collated, the Australian flowering

vascular flora comprises 222 families, 2638 genera and 18,821

species of which c. 10.6% of species are introduced (Table 1).

The geometric mean number of species in a family is

13.55 ± 17.08 (median

¼ 11.5, range 1–2509), and the geo-

metric mean of genera in a family is 4.08 ± 1.94 (median

¼ 3,

range 1–256). We consider that there are only 31 flowering



plant species in Australia that can be unambiguously consid-

ered extinct at the present time (Table 1). The number of

families containing endangered species is 63 (179 genera), and

there are 18 families (27 genera) with extinct species in them.

Most of the species are herbs and shrubs(Fig. 1a), and most

(c. 76%) of the introduced species in Australia are herbs

(Fig. 1a). The majority of species are long-lived (more than

2 years), and introduced species are found equally in both

categories (Fig. 1b). Most species have a bisexual sex system

(Fig. 1c), including introduced species. The predominant fruit

type is dry-dehiscent (Fig. 1d) in both native and introduced

species.


Life-history characters

A comparison of endangered versus extant (native species

only) showed no significant difference in habit (G

¼ 6.13,


P > 0.05, Fig. 2a). However, when habit in extinct species is

compared with that in extant species, trees are significantly

absent from the extinct flora (G

¼ 12.76, P < 0.05, Fig. 2a).

The GLM model for extinct versus extant yielded the model

y

 habit



(Wald

¼ 19.86,


P

¼ 0.013,


32%

deviance


explained). A comparison of endangered versus extant for

sex


system

showed


significant

differences

(G

¼ 27.43,


P < 0.001, Fig. 2b), but not in the extinct flora (G

¼ 0.38,


P > 0.05, Fig. 2b). Similarly there were significant differences

in the distribution of fruit types between endangered versus

extant flora (G

¼ 56.47, P < 0.001, Fig. 2c), but not for the

extinct species (G

¼ 0.25, P > 0.05, Fig. 2c).

Stepwise reduction of the saturated GLM model for life

history of endangered versus extant (native only) yielded

y

 habit + sex + fruit + habit : sex + habit : fruit. We at-



tempted to reduce the model further by removing the two-way

interactions. An analysis of deviance indicated that removal of

either of these interactions resulted in significant increases in

deviance. Hence these two two-way interactions were kept in the

model. Because neither the contrast for lianes nor for vines was

significant when compared with other habits, we attempted to

reduce the number of levels for habit by lumping lianes with

shrub, and vines with herbs to fit a simpler model. Because the

simpler model had a decreased AIC value and an analysis of

deviance indicated that lumping habit levels did not show a

significant increase in deviance, the simpler model was accepted.

Further attempts to reduce the model by either removing terms

or reducing the number of levels within variables either

increased the AIC, resulted in a significant increase in deviance,

or were not biologically relevant. Thus, the minimum model

accepted is y

 habit3 + sex + fruit + habit3 : sex + habit3 :

fruit, where habit3 consists of herbs (including vines), shrubs

(including lianes) and trees (Table 2). The abundance of sex and

fruit types varied significantly between the endangered and the

extant data sets (Table 3). Significant interactions occurred

where habit and sex type and habit and fruit type varied

differently in the endangered data set compared with in the

Life-history characters in the Australian flora

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290

275


ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Table 1 A list of the families, number of genera and species and the percentage of species introduced to Australia. The endangered species

from the EPBC Act (1999) are listed. Where more than one infra-specific taxon is listed only one was included in the analysis. Extinct species

are listed according to rules listed in the text. Family names follow Stevens (2001 onwards)

Family


No. genera

No. spp.


% intro

Endangered

Extinct

Acanthaceae



25

57

17.5



Graptophyllum reticulatum, Isoglossa eranthemoides,

Xerothamnella herbacea

Actinidaceae

1

1



0.0

Agavaceae

6

9

88.9



Aizoaceae

19

61



36.1

Akaniaceae

1

1

0.0



Alismataceae

5

10



60.0

Alseuosmiaceae

2

2

0.0



Amaranthaceae

47

481



8.7

Roycea pycnophylloides, Sclerolaena napiformis

Anacardiaceae

10

14



35.7

Anarthriaceae

2

7

0.0



Annonaceae

19

50



4.0

Apiaceae


41

185


15.1

Eryngium fontanum, Gingidia montana,

Trachymene saniculifolia

Apocynaceae

44

183


9.3

Cynanchum elegans, Ochrosia moorei,

Parsonsia dorrigoensis,

Tylophora linearis, T. rupicola, T. woollsii

Marsdenia araujacea

Aponogetanaceae

1

10

20.0



Aponogeton bullusus, A. proliferus

Aquifoliaceae

2

5

20.0



Araceae

16

39



15.4

Araliaceae

11

46

6.5



Astrotricha roddii

Arecaceae

24

59

5.1



Archontophoenix myolensis, Ptychosperma bleeseri

Aristolochiaceae

2

13

7.7



Asphodelaceae

2

5



100.0

Asteraceae

256

1121


21.9

Argentipallium spiceri, Brachyscome muelleri,

Calotis moorei, Leucochrysum albicans var.

tricolor, Olearia flocktoniae,

Olearia hygrophila, Olearia microdisca,

Rutidosis leptorrhynchoides, Senecio behrianus

Olearia oliganthema,

Ozothamnus selaginoides,

Picris compacta,

Picris drummondii,

Senecio georgianus

Atherspermaceae

1

1

0.0



Austrobaileyaceae

1

2



0.0

Balanopaceae

1

1

0.0



Balanophoraceae

1

2



0.0

Balsaminaceae

1

1

100.0



Basellaceae

1

1



100.0

Bataceae


1

1

0.0



Berberidaceae

2

3



100.0

Betulaceae

1

1

100.0



Bignoniaceae

12

19



36.8

Bixaceae


2

4

25.0



Blandfordiaceae

1

4



0.0

Boraginaceae

26

156


19.9

Brassicaceae

60

195


37.9

Ballantinia antipoda, Barbarea

australis, Irenepharsus trypherus,

Lepidium hyssopifolium,

L. monoplocoides, L. peregrinum

Lepidium drummondii

Bromeliaceae

2

2



100.0

Burmanniaceae

2

4

0.0



Burmannia sp. Melville Island

(R. Fensham 1021)

Burseraceae

2

5



0.0

Byblidaceae

1

2

0.0



Cabombaceae

2

2



50.0

Cactaceae

7

23

100.0



Calycanthaceae

1

1



0.0

Campanulaceae

9

64

6.3



Hypsela sessiliflora

A. Sjo¨stro¨m and C. L. Gross

276

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290



ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Table 1 continued

Family


No. genera

No. spp.


% intro

Endangered

Extinct

Cannabaceae



2

2

100.0



Cannaceae

1

1



100.0

Caprifoliaceae

4

8

75.0



Cardiopteridaceae

1

1



0.0

Caricaceae

1

1

100.0



Caryophyllaceae

24

83



62.7

Sagina diemensis

Casuarinaceae

3

64



0.0

Allocasuarina defungens, A. emuina,

A. glareicola, A. portuensis, A. thalassoscopica

Celastraceae

19

57

0.0



Apatophyllum constablei

Centrolepidaceae

3

31

0.0



Centrolepis caespitosa

Cephalotaceae

1

1

0.0



Ceratophyllaceae

1

2



0.0

Chrysobalanaceae

2

2

0.0



Cistaceae

1

1



100.0

Clusiaceae

6

23

17.4



Colchicaceae

8

47



4.3

Wurmbea calcicola, W. tubulosa

Combretaceae

6

36



2.8

Commelinaceae

11

35

22.9



Connaraceae

2

2



0.0

Convolvulaceae

20

119


16.8

Cornaceae

1

2

0.0



Corsiaceae

1

1



0.0

Corynocarpaceae

1

2

0.0



Costaceae

2

3



0.0

Crassulaceae

6

29

71.4



Cucurbitaceae

18

43



27.9

Mukia sp. Longreach (D.Davidson AQ279935)

Cunoniaceae

16

35



0.0

Davidsonia jerseyana, D. johnsonii

Cymodoceaceae

5

10



0.0

Cyperaceae

45

682


6.6

Cyperus cephalotes, Fimbristylis adjuncta,

Lepidosperma rostratum

Datiscaceae

1

1

0.0



Dichapetalaceae

1

1



0.0

Dilleniaceae

5

140


0.0

Dioscoreaceae

2

7

0.0



Dipsacaeae

2

4



100.0

Doryanthaceae

1

2

0.0



Droseraceae

2

55



0.0

Ebenaceae

1

15

0.0



Diospyros mabacea

Elaeagnaceae

1

1

0.0



Elaeocarpaceae

9

88



0.0

Elaeocarpus sp. Rocky Creek (G.Read AQ562114),

E. williamsianus, Tetratheca deltoidea, T. gunnii,

T. paynterae

Tetratheca fasciculata

Elatinaceae

2

8

0.0



Ericaceae

35

433



1.8

Andersonia axilliflora, A. gracilis, Epacris acuminate,

E. apsleyensis, E. barbata, E. exserta, E. grandis,

E. hamiltonii, E. limbata, E. sp. aff. virgata ‘graniticola’,

E. stuartii, Leucopogon confertus, L. gnaphalioides,

L. marginatus, L. obtectus, L. sp. Coolmunda

(D.Halford Q 1635), Melichrus hirsutus J.B.Williams ms.,

M. sp. Gibberagee (A.S.Benwell & J.B.Williams 97239)

Leucopogon cryptanthus

Eriocaulaceae

1

26

0.0



Eriocaulon australasicum, E. carsonii

Erythroxylaceae

1

4

0.0



Euphorbiaceae

52

278



12.2

Bertya ingramii, B. sp. Beeron Holding (P.I.Forster 5753),

Beyeria lepidopetala, Fontainea oraria,

Ricinocarpos trichophorus

Sankowskya stipularis

Amperea xiphoclada

var. pedicillata

Eupomatiaceae

1

2

0.0



Life-history characters in the Australian flora

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290

277

ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd



Table 1 continued

Family


No. genera

No. spp.


% intro

Endangered

Extinct

Fabaceae


176

2509


7.7

Acacia aprica, A. aristulata, A. ataxiphylla subsp. magna,

A. auratiflora, A. brachypoda, A. cochlocarpa subsp.

cochlocarpa, A. cretacea, A. enterocarpa, A. gordonii,

A. insolita subsp. recurva, A. lanuginophylla, A. leptalea,

A. lobulata, A. pharangites, A. pinguifolia, A. porcata,

A. pygmaea, A. recurvata, A. rhamphophylla, A. ruppii,

A. sciophanes, A. shirleyi, A. sp. Dandaragan

(S. van Leeuwen 269), A. subflexuosa subsp. capillata,

A. terminalis subsp. terminalis, A. vassalii, A. volubilis,

A. whibleyana, Cajanus mareebensis, Chorizema humile,

Chorizema varium, Cullen parvum, Daviesia bursarioides

D. cunderdin, D. euphorbioides, D. megacalyx, D. microcarpa,

D. speciosa, Gastrolobium glaucum, G. graniticum,

G. hamulosum, Jacksonia pungens J.Chappill ms.,

J. quairading J.Chappill ms., J. sp. Collie (C.J.Koch 177),

Kennedia macrophylla, Pultenaea parris parrisiae subsp. elusa,

Stonesiella (Pultenaea) selaginoides, Swainsona recta

Acacia kingiana,

A. prismifolia,

Indigofera efoliata,

Pultenaea maidenii,

Streblorrhiza speciosa

Fagaceae


1

3

100.00



Flagellariaceae

1

1



0.0

Frankeniaceae

1

47

2.1



Frankenia plicata

Fumariaceae

4

10

100.0



Gentianaceae

8

31



22.6

Gentiana baeuerlenii, G. wingecarribiensis

Geraniaceae

3

34



41.2

Gesneriaceae

5

6

0.0



Goodeniaceae

12

379



0.0

Coopernookia georgei, Lechenaultia laricina, L. pulvinaris

Grossulariaceae

10

27



7.4

Gunneraceae

1

1

0.0



Gyrostemnonaceae

5

18



0.0

Gyrostemon reticulatus

Haemodoraceae

8

74



2.7

Anigozanthos bicolor subsp. minor, Conostylis dielsii subsp.

teres, C. drummondii, C. lepidospermoides, C. micrantha,

C. misera, C. seorsiflora subsp. trichophylla, C. setigera

subsp. dasys, C. wonganensis

Haloragaceae

6

105


0.0

Haloragis eyreana, Haloragodendron lucasii,

Myriophyllum lapidicola

Haloragis platycarpa

Hamamelidaceae

3

3



0.0

Hanguanaceae

1

1

0.0



Hemerocallidaceae

1

1



0.0

Hernandiaceae

3

6

0.0



Himantandraceae

1

1



0.0

Hydatellaceae

2

7

0.0



Hydatella dioica

Hydrocharitaceae

13

28

10.7



Hypoxidaceae

1

10



0

Icacinaceae

6

7

0.0



Iridaceae

32

95



69.5

Orthrosanthus muelleri, Patersonia spirafolia

Juncaceae

2

74



27.0

Juncaginaceae

3

16

6.3



Lamiaceae

44

293



16.0

Hemiandra gardneri, H. rutilans, H. sp. Watheroo

(S.Hancocks 4), Plectranthus habrophyllus, P. nitidus,

P. omissus, P. torrenticola rostanthera askania, P. eurybioides,

P. junonis, Westringia crassifolia, W. kydrensis

Prostanthera albo-hirta,

P. marifolia

Lauraceae

9

131


1.5

Endiandra cooperana, E. floydii

Laxmanniaceae

3

107



0.0

Lecythidaceae

2

5

0.0



Lentibulaniaceae

1

61



1.6

Liliaceae

55

180


24.4

Borya mirabilis, Dianella amoena

Limnocharitaceae

2

2



50.0

A. Sjo¨stro¨m and C. L. Gross

278

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290



ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Table 1 continued

Family


No. genera

No. spp.


% intro

Endangered

Extinct

Linaceae


1

7

71.4



Loganiaceae

9

101



1.0

Loranthaceae

12

69

0.0



Amyema scandens

Luzuriagaceae

1

2

0.0



Lythraceae

10

29



17.2

Malpighiaceae

2

2

0.0



Malvaceae

61

471



7.0

Corchorus cunninghamii, Lasiopetalum pterocarpum

E.M.Benn & K.Shepherd ms., L. rotundifolium, Rulingia prostrata,

Rulingia sp. Trigwell Bridge (R.Smith s.n. 20/6/1989),

Thomasia sp. Green Hill (S.Paust 1322)

Melastomataceae

5

8

12.5



Meliaceae

12

41



2.4

Melianthaceae

1

2

100.0



Memecylaceae

1

3



0.0

Menispermaceae

11

18

0.0



Carronia pedicellata

Menyanthaceae

3

30

0.0



Villarsia calthifolia

Molluginaceae

3

13

0.0



Macarthuria keigheryi

Monimiaceae

12

35

0.0



Daphnandra sp. Illawarra (R.Schodde 3475)

Moraceae


10

46

4.3



Moringaceae

1

1



100.0

Musaceae


1

3

0.0



Musa fitzalanii

Myoporaceae

2

248


0.0

Eremophila denticulata subsp. trisulcata Chinnock ms.,

E. nivea, E. pinnatifida Chinnock ms., E. resinosa,

E. scaberula, E. ternifolia, E. veneta Chinnock ms.,

E. verticillata, E. virens, Myoporum turbinatum

Myristicaceae

2

3

0.0



Myrsinaceae

7

34



5.9

Rapanea sp. Richmond River (J.H.Maiden & J.L.Boorman NSW 26751)

Myrtaceae

77

1593



0.4

Austromyrtus fragrantissima, Austromyrtus gonoclada, Baeckea kandos,

Calytrix breviseta subsp. breviseta, Chamelaucium sp. Gingin

(N.G.Marchant s.n. 4/11/1988), Darwinia acerosa, D. apiculata,

D. carnea, D. chapmaniana Marchant & Keighery ms., D. collina,

D. ferricola N.G.Marchant & Keighery ms., D. oxylepis,

D. sp. Carnamah (J.Coleby-Williams 148), D. sp. Williamson

(G.J.Keighery 12717), D. wittwerorum, Decaspermum sp. Mt Morgan

(D.Hoy 71), Eucalyptus absita, E. balanites, E. beardiana, E. bennettiae,

E. brevipes, E. burdettiana, E. conglomerata, E. copulans, E. crenulata,

E. crucis subsp. praecipua, E. cuprea, E. dolorosa,

E. graniticola Brooker & Hopper ms., E. gunnii subsp. divaricata,

E. imlayensis, E. impensa, E. insularis, E. leprophloia, E. morrisbyi,

E. pachycalyx subsp. banyabba, E. phylacis, E. pruiniramis, E. recurva,

E. rhodantha var. petiolaris, E. sp. Howes Swamp Creek

(M.Doherty 19/7/1985 NSW 207054), Hypocalymma longifolium,

Micromyrtus grandis, Triplarina imbricata, Triplarina nowraensis,

Uromyrtus australis, Verticordia albida, V. densiflora var. pedunculata,

V. fimbrilepis subsp. fimbrilepis,V. harveyi,V. hughanii, V. pityrhops,

V. plumosa var. ananeotes, V. plumosa var. pleiobotrya,

V. plumosa var. vassensis, V. spicata subsp. squamosa,

V. staminosa subsp. cylindracea var. cylindracea,

V. staminosa subsp. staminosa, Xanthostemon formosus

Nelumbonaceae

1

1

0.0



Nepenthaceae

1

1



0.0

Nothofagaceae

1

3

0.0



Nyctaginaceae

5

15



13.3

Nymphaeceae

2

13

30.8



Ochnaceae

2

2



50.0

Olacaceae

3

13

0.0



Oleaceae

9

30



20.0

Life-history characters in the Australian flora

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290

279


ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Table 1 continued

Family


No. genera

No. spp.


% intro

Endangered

Extinct

Onagraceae



5

37

54.1



Opiliaceae

2

2



0.0

Orchidaceae

105

862


0.3

Arthrochilus huntianus subsp. nothofagicola, Caladenia

(listed as Drakonorchis) drakeoides Hopper & A.P.Brown ms.,

C. amoena, C. anthracina, C. arenaria, C. argocalla, C. atroclavia,

C. audasii, C. behrii, C. bryceana subsp. bryceana, C. busselliana

Hopper & A.P.Brown ms., C. caesarea subsp. maritima, C. campbellii,

C. carnea var. subulata, C. colorata, C. dienema, C. dorrienii, C. elegans

Hopper & A.P.Brown ms., C. excelsa Hopper & A.P.Brown ms.,

C. fragrantissima subsp. orientalis, C. fulva, C. gladiolata, C. hastata,

C. hoffmanii Hopper & A.P.Brown ms., C. huegelii Hopper &

A.P.Brown ms., C. lindleyana, C. lowanensis, C. macroclavia, C. pallida,

C. richardsiorum, C. rigida, C. robinsonii, C. rosella, C. saggicola, C. sp. aff.

venusta, C. sylvicola, C. tensa, C. thysanochila, C. tonellii, C. viridescens

Hopper & A.P.Brown ms., C. winfieldii Hopper & A.P.Brown ms.,

C. xanthochila, C. xantholeuca, Calochilus psednus, C. richiae, Corybas sp.

Finniss (R.Bates 28794), Crepidium lawleri, Dendrobium antennatum,

D. lithocola, D. mirbelianum, D. nindii, Dipodium pictum, Diuris basaltica

D.L. Jones ined., D. fragrantissima, D. lanceolata, D. pedunculata,

D. purdiei, Drakaea confluens Hopper & A.P.Brown ms., D. elastica,

D. isolata Hopper & A.P.Brown ms., Epiblema grandiflorum var. cyanea

K.Dixon ms., Genoplesium brachystachyum, G. firthii, G. plumosum,

G. rhyoliticum, G. tectum, Habenaria macraithii, Microtis angusii,

Paracaleana dixonii Hopper & A.P.Brown ms., Phaius australis,

P. bernaysii, Phaius tancarvilleae, Phalaenopsis rosenstromii, Prasophyllum

affine, P. amoenum, P. apoxychilum, P. castaneum, P. correctum,

P. diversiflorum, P. favonium, P. frenchii, P. milfordense, P. olidum,

P. perangustum, P. petilum, P. pulchellum, P. robustum, P. secutum,

P. stellatum, P. suaveolens, P. subbisectum, P. tunbridgense, P. uroglossum,

Pterostylis aenigma, P. atriola, P. basaltica, P. commutata, P. despectans,

P. gibbosa, P. rubenachii, P. saxicola, P. sp. Botany Bay

(A.Bishop J221/1-13), P. sp. Halbury (R.Bates 8425), P. sp. Hale

(R.Bates 21725), P. sp. Northampton (S.D.Hopper 3349), P. wapstrarum,

P. ziegeleri, Rhizanthella gardneri, Thelymitra epipactoides, T. jonesii,

T. manginii K.Dixon & Batty ms., T. stellata, Vrydagzynea paludosa

Acianthus

ledwardii,

Caladenia

brachyscapa,

C. pumila,

Diplocaulobium

masonii,

Diuris bracteata,

Oberonia

attenuata

Orobanchaceae

1

2



50.0

Oxalidaceae

2

30

73.3



Pandanaceae

2

36



0.0

Pandanus spiralis var. flammeus

Papaveraceae

6

13



100.0

Passifloraceae

2

14

64.3



Pedaliaceae

5

8



50.0

Philydraceae

3

5

0.0



Phyllanthaceae

14

148



2.0

Phytolaccaceae

3

5

80.0



Piperaceae

3

11



9.1

Pittosporaceae

11

88

0.0



Bentleya spinescens, Marianthus (Billardiera) mollis

Plantaginaceae

2

43

27.9



Plumbaginaceae

4

11



63.6

Poaceae


234

1299


23.9

Agrostis adamsonii, A. limitanea, A. granitica, Austrostipa wakoolica,

Danthonia popinensis, Deyeuxia appressa, D. drummondii,

Digitaria porrecta, Eremochloa muricata, Glyceria drummondii

Amphibromus

whitei


Podostemaceae

2

2



0.0

Polemoniaceae

3

4

75.0



Polygalaceae

6

45



11.1

Polygonaceae

11

54

42.6



Muehlenbeckia tuggeranong

Pontederiaceae

3

6

33.3



Portulacaceae

9

59



8.5

A. Sjo¨stro¨m and C. L. Gross

280

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290



ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Table 1 continued

Family


No. genera

No. spp.


% intro

Endangered

Extinct

Posidonaceae



1

8

0.0



Potamogetonaceae

4

19



5.3

Primulaceae

4

10

30.0



Proteaceae

46

1007



0.0

Adenanthos cunninghamii, A. dobagii, A. eyrei, A. pungens subsp.

effusus, A. velutinus, Banksia brownii, B. cuneata, B. oligantha,

Conospermum densiflorum subsp. unicephalatum, Conospermum toddii,

Dryandra anatona, D. aurantia, D. ionthocarpa, D. mimica, D. montana,

D. nivea subsp. uliginosa, Eidothea hardeniana, Grevillea acanthifolia

subsp. paludosa, G. althoferorum, G. batrachioides, G. beadleana,

G. caleyi, G. calliantha, G. christineae, G. curviloba subsp. curviloba,

G. curviloba subsp. incurva, G. dryandroides subsp. dryandroides,

G. dryandroides subsp. hirsuta, G. guthrieana, G. humifusa, G. iaspicula,

G. infundibularis, G. involucrata, G. maccutcheonii, G. masonii,

G. maxwellii, G. mollis, G. molyneuxii, G. murex, G. obtusiflora, G. pythara,

G. rara, G. rivularis, G. scapigera, G. wilkinsonii, G. williamsonii, Hakea

dohertyi, H. pulvinifera, Isopogon uncinatus, Lambertia echinata subsp.

echinata, L. echinata subsp. occidentalis, L. fairallii, L. orbifolia, Lomatia

tasmanica, Macadamia jansenii, Persoonia hirsuta, P. micranthera, P. mollis

subsp. maxima, P. nutans, Petrophile latericola Keighery ms., Synaphea

quartzitica, Triunia robusta

Persoonia

laxa,


P. prostrata

Putranjivaceae

1

4

0.0



Rafflesiaceae

1

2



0.0

Ranunculaceae

9

67

20.9



Ranunculus prasinus

Resedaceae

1

4

100.0



Restionaceae

35

119



0.0

Chordifex (Restio) abortivus

Rhamnaceae

18

165



1.8

Pomaderris cotoneaster, Spyridium microphyllum, Spyridium sp.

(Little Desert), Stenanthemum pimeleoides

Rhipogonaceae

1

5

0.0



Rhizophoraceae

4

12



0.0

Rosaceae


22

82

76.8



Rubiaceae

49

248



6.9

Randia moorei

Rutaceae

46

397



1.3

Acronychia littoralis, Asterolasia elegans, Boronia capitata subsp. capitata,

B. exilis, B. granitica, B. repanda, B. revoluta, Correa lawrenceana var.

genoensis, Drummondita ericoides, Leionema equestre, L. lachnaeoides,

Phebalium daviesii, Philotheca basistyla, P. freyciana, P. wonganensis,

Zieria adenophora, Z. baeuerlenii, J.A.Armstrong ms., Z. buxijugum

J.Briggs & J.A.Armstrong ms., Z. covenyi J.A.Armstrong ms., Z. floydii

J.A.Armstrong ms., Z. formosa J.Briggs & J.A.Armstrong ms.,

Z. granulata, Z. ingramii J.A.Armstrong ms., Z. lasiocaulis J.A.Armstrong

ms., Z. obcordata, Z. parrisiae J.Briggs & J.A.Armstrong ms., Z. prostrata

J.A.Armstrong ms., Z. sp. Brolga Park (A.R.Bean 1002)

Philotheca

falcatus

Salicaceae

11

31

29.0



Santalaceae

13

61



0.0

Spirogardnera rubescens

Sapindaceae

33

200



2.5

Alectryon ramiflorus, Atalaya collina, Cossinia australiana,

Diploglottis campbellii, Dodonaea subglandulifera, Toechima pterocarpum

Sapotaceae

7

29

0.0



Pouteria (Planchonella) eerwah

Saxifragaceae

1

1

0.0



Scrophulariaceae

51

170



30.0

Euphrasia collina subsp. muelleri, E. collina subsp. osbornii, E. fragosa,

E. gibbsiae subsp. psilantherea, E. semipicta, E. sp. ‘fabula’,

Microcarpaea agonis, Stemodia haegii

Euphrasia

arguta


Simaroubaceae

4

9



11.1

Quassia sp. Mooney Creek (J.King s.n. 1949)

Smilaceae

3

9



0.0

Solanaceae

23

210


24.3

Cyphanthera odgersii subsp. occidentalis, Symonanthus bancroftii

Sparganiaceae

1

2



50.0

Sphenocleaceae

1

1

0.0



Stemonaceae

1

4



0.0

Life-history characters in the Australian flora

Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290

281


ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

extant data set (Fig. 3, Table 3), notably in the herbaceous life

form.


Stepwise reduction of the multinomial model comparing

endangered, extinct and extant species yielded y

 habit +

sex + fruit + habit : fruit. As for the GLM model for the

endangered species, the model was further reduced by lumping

the habit categories of herbs with vines, and shrubs with lianes.

This simpler model had a reduced AIC, and an anova

comparing the two models showed no significant increase in

deviance (LR

¼ 12.66, d.f. ¼ 12, P > 0.05).

Species richness

When the abundance of endangered species was examined

across the 1978 native genera, most of them contained no

endangered species. The GLM regression of proportion of

endangered to the log of the size of genus was highly significant

(odds ratio

¼ 1.131 with 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.099–

1.163, t


¼ 4.37, P < 0.001; G

2

¼ 19.17, d.f. ¼ 1, P < 0.001,



Fig. 4a), showing that species-rich genera are proportionately

more likely to contain endangered species than species-poor

genera. These results are not surprising: the bigger the genus

the more likely it will be that it will contain an endangered

species. When only those genera containing an endangered

species were examined (n

¼ 179), endangered species are more

likely to occur in small genera (odds ratio

¼ 0.619 with 95%

CI 0.596–0.643, t

¼

)7.17; G


2

¼ 169.53, d.f. ¼ 1, P < 0.001,

Fig. 4c). However, because most genera are small in the

Australian flora we queried whether this relationship would

hold irrespective of which genera are used in the analyses. If a

significant relationship between genus size and the proportion

of endangered species can be detected using a random sample

of all genera it would indicate that endangered species are

occurring in small genera in a random way. This was tested

using a bootstrap test on a model with the original endangered

proportion data as the response variable and the log of the size

of the genus as the explanatory term. A weighted regression

was performed on each of 10 000 different random samples

(n

¼ 179). Of the resulting P values, only 2945 were ‡ 0.05.



This strongly suggests that endangered species only occur in

small genera because most genera in Australia are small. Most

genera do not have extinct species, but no significant

relationship was found against genus richness (t

¼

)0.18;


G

2

¼ 0.61, d.f. ¼ 1, P ¼ 0.43, Fig. 4b). When only those



genera containing an extinct species were examined (n

¼ 27),


a significant relationship was found whereby small genera are

more likely to contain extinct species than larger genera (odds

ratio

¼ 0.365


with

95%


CI

0.318–0.420,

t

¼

)7.24;



G

2

¼



)61.54, d.f. ¼ 1, P < 0.001, Fig. 4d).

Only 33% of families contained at least one endangered or

extinct species. Similarly, the relationship between threat status

and family speciosity showed that highly species-rich families

are more likely to contain endangered species than species-poor

families (odds ratio

¼ 1.139 with 95% CI 1.073–1.209,

t

¼ 2.18; G



2

¼ 14.5, d.f. ¼ 1, P ¼ 0.03). A significant rela-

tionship between species richness in families and extinct species

was not found (t

¼ 0.51; G

2

¼ 0.26, d.f. ¼ 1, P ¼ 0.61). When



only those families containing an endangered species were

Table 1 continued

Family

No. genera



No. spp.

% intro


Endangered

Extinct


Stylidiaceae

5

241



0.0

Stylidium coroniforme

Surianaceae

4

5



0.0

Symplocaceae

1

15

0.0



Tamaricaceae

1

1



100.0

Theaceae


2

2

50.0



Thymelaceae

10

106



0.9

Pimelea spicata, P. spinescens subsp. spinescens,

P. venosa

Pimelea spinescens subsp.

pubiflora

Trimeniaceae

1

1

0.0



Triuridaceae

1

1



0.0

Tropaeolaceae

1

1

100.0



Typhaceae

1

3



33.3

Ulmaceae


4

10

10.0



Urticaceae

13

25



28.0

Valerianaceae

3

8

87.5



Verbenaceae

28

167



10.8

Pityrodia scabra

Violaceae

5

23



13.0

Vitaceae


7

44

2.3



Winteraceae

2

10



0.0

Xanthorrhoeaceae

9

50

0.0



Xyridaceae

1

20



0.0

Zingiberaceae

9

18

33.3



Zosteraceae

2

4



0.0

Zygophyllaceae

5

55

3.6



Total

2638


18,821

10.60


A. Sjo¨stro¨m and C. L. Gross

282


Journal of Biogeography 33, 271–290

ª 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation ª 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd



used in the analyses (n

¼ 62), no significant relationship was

detected (t

¼

)0.68; G



2

¼ 3.24, d.f. ¼ 1, P ¼ 0.5). However,

when only those families containing an extinct species were

used in the analyses, a significant relationship was detected

(odds ratio

¼ 0.538 with 95% CI 0.465–0.621, t ¼

)4.23;

G

2



¼ 14.98, d.f. ¼ 1, P < 0.0001), showing that large families

are less likely to have extinct species than smaller families.

However, to examine this relationship further for family size

and families containing only extinct species we ran another

bootstrap test (see above). Here the results from the weighted

regressions using 10 000 different random samples of families

(n

¼ 16) and the proportion of extinct species were mostly



significant, with 4144 of the 10 000 iterations yielding a P value

‡ 0.05. Thus low family speciosity is an unlikely predictor of

extinction risk.

The association of extinction risk with phylogeny

The distribution of threat status at the generic level was

investigated for 1640 genera in the Australian angiosperm

0

10

20



30

40

50



Herb Vine Liane Shr

ub Tree


% of species 

% of species 

% of species 

All


Extinct

Endangered

0

20

40



60

80

100



Bisexual

Dioecious

Monoecious

0

20



40

60

80



Dry-indeh

Dry-deh


Fleshy



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə