Oakajee port and rail opr rail development vegetation and flora assessment



Yüklə 316.27 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/4
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü316.27 Kb.
1   2   3   4

1.1

 

LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK 

Federal and State legislation applicable to the conservation of native flora and fauna includes, but is 

not  limited  to,  the  Environment  Protection  and  Biodiversity  Conservation  Act  1999  (EPBC  Act),  the 

Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (WC Act) and the Environmental Protection Act 1986 (EP Act).   

Section  4a  of  the  EP  Act  requires  that  developments  take  into  account  the  following  principles 

applicable to native flora and fauna: 

 



The Precautionary Principle 

Where there are threats of serious or irreversible damage, lack of full scientific certainty should 

not be used as a reason for postponing measures to prevent environmental degradation. 

 



The Principles of Intergenerational Equity 

The  present  generation  should  ensure  that  the  health,  diversity  and  productivity  of  the 

environment is maintained or enhanced for the benefit of future generations. 

 



The Principle of the Conservation of Biological Diversity and Ecological Integrity 

Conservation  of  biological  diversity  and  ecological  integrity  should  be  a  fundamental 

consideration. 

Furthermore,  vegetation  and  flora  surveys  undertaken  as  part  of  the  environmental  impact 

assessment (EIA) process are required to address the following: 

 



Environmental  Protection  Authority’s  (EPA’s)  Position  Statement  No.  3:  Terrestrial  Biological 

Surveys as an Element of Biodiversity Protection (EPA, 2002); and 

 

Guidance Statement No. 51: Terrestrial Flora and Vegetation Surveys for Environmental Impact 



Assessment in Western Australia (EPA, 2004a).  

Native flora and fauna in Western Australia are protected at a Federal level under the EPBC Act and 

at a State level under the WC Act. 

The  EPBC  Act  was  developed  to  provide  for  the  protection  of  the  environment,  especially  those 

aspects  of  the  environment  that  are  Matters  of  National  Environmental  Significance,  to  promote 

ecologically  sustainable  development  through  the  conservation  and  ecologically  sustainable  use  of 

natural resources; and to promote the conservation of biodiversity.  The EPBC Act includes provisions 

to  protect  native  species  (in  particular  to  prevent  the  extinction  and  promote  the  recovery  of 

threatened  species)  and  to  ensure  the  conservation  of  migratory  species.    In  addition  to  the 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

March 2010 



 

 

 



 

2

principles outlined in Section 4a of the EP Act, Section 3a of the EPBC Act includes the principle of 



ecologically  sustainable  development,  dictating  that  decision‐making  processes  should  effectively 

integrate  both  long‐term  and  short‐term  economic,  environmental,  social  and  equitable 

considerations.   

The  WC  Act  was  developed  to  provide  for  the  conservation  and  protection  of  wildlife  in  Western 

Australia.  Under Section 14 of this Act, all fauna and flora within Western Australia are protected; 

however, the Minister may, via a notice published in the Government Gazette, declare a list of flora 

taxa identified as likely to become extinct, or as rare, or otherwise in need of special protection.  The 

current listing was gazetted on the 5

th

 of August 2008 (WC Act, 2008(2)). 



1.2

 

SURVEY OBJECTIVES 

The EPA’s objectives with regards to the management of native flora and vegetation are to: 

 

Avoid adverse impacts on biological diversity comprising the different plants and animals and 



the ecosystems they form, at the levels of genetic, species and ecosystem diversity. 

 



Maintain  the  abundance,  species  diversity,  geographic  distribution  and  productivity  of 

vegetation communities. 

 

Protect Declared Rare Flora (DRF) consistent with the provisions of the WC Act



 

Protect other flora species of conservation significance. 



The primary objective of the vegetation and flora assessment was to provide sufficient information 

to the EPA to assess the impact of the development on the vegetation and flora of the Project Area, 

thereby ensuring that these objectives will be upheld. 

Specifically,  this  survey  was  to  satisfy  the  requirements  documented  in  the  EPA’s  Guidance 

Statement 51 and Position Statement No. 3, thus providing: 

 



A review of background information (including literature and database searches). 

 



An inventory of vegetation types and flora species occurring in the Project Area, incorporating 

recent published and unpublished records. 

 

An inventory of species of biological and conservation significance recorded or likely to occur 



within the Project Area and surrounds. 

 



A map and detailed description of vegetation types occurring in the Project Area. 

 



A description of the characteristics of the vegetation types. 

 



An appraisal of the current knowledge base for the area, including a review of previous surveys 

conducted in the area relevant to the current study. 

 

A  review  of  regional  and  biogeographical  significance,  including  the  conservation  status  of 



species recorded in the Project Area. 

 



A risk assessment to determine likely impacts of threatening processes on vegetation and flora 

within the Project Area (to be included in a separate report). 

 

 


Meekatharra

YUIN


YANDI

YALGOO


Mullewa

MILEURA


DARTMOOR

WELD RANGE

TWIN PEAKS

NORTHAMPTON

Mount Magnet

MOUNT WITTENOOM

Geraldton

150000


300000

450000


600000

750000


6

7

5



0

0

0



0

6

9



0

0

0



0

0

7



0

5

0



0

0

0



Legend

OPR Proposed Rail Corridor



Coordinate System

Name: GD A 1994 MGA Zone 50

Projection: Transverse Mercator

Datum: GDA 1994



A4

Figure: 1.1

Project ID: 1131

Drawn: AH

Date:   27/11/09

K

0



60

120


Kilometres

1:2,700,000

Absolute Scale - 

Unique Map ID: A024



Location of the Project Area

Geraldton



 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

March 2010 



 

 

 



 

4

This page has been left blank intentionally 



 

 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

March 2010 



 

 

 



 

5

2



 

EXISTING ENVIRONMENT 

2.1

 

CLIMATE 

The Project Area is located within Beard’s (1976) Eremaean and South‐western Botanical Provinces.  

Beard (1976) describes the climate associated with these provinces as desert (with bimodal summer 

and  winter  rainfall),  and  Mediterranean  (dry  warm  Mediterranean  near  the  coast  and  semi‐desert 

Mediterranean further east). 

Three Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) weather stations were selected to provide an indication of the 

local climatic conditions along the Project Area: 

 



Geraldton Airport weather station (site number 008051); 

 



Mullewa weather station (site number 008095); and 

 



Meekatharra Airport weather station (site number 007045). 

Geraldton’s  Mediterranean  climate  is  described  as  hot  and  dry  in  summer  and  mild  and  wet  in 

winter.  The climate is strongly influenced by a sub‐tropical ridge (high pressure) and the west coast 

trough (low pressure), and seasonal extremes in weather are experienced (Figure 2.1). 

The mean annual rainfall for Geraldton is 447.5 mm falling over 86 rainfall days.  The wettest period 

is from May to August, when a mean of 327.4 mm falls over 51 rainfall days; approximately 73% of 

the mean annual rainfall.  The wettest month is June with a mean of 100.1 mm falling over 14 rainfall 

days (Figure 2.1). 

February  is  the  hottest  month  with  a  mean  maximum  temperature  of  32.5°C.    July  temperatures 

range from a mean maximum of 19.5°C to a mean minimum of 9.5°C (Figure 2.1) (BOM, 2009). 

0

20

40



60

80

100



120

Jan


Feb

Mar


Apr

May


Jun

Jul


Aug

Sep


Oct

Nov


Dec

R

a



in

fa

ll



 (

m

m



)

0

5



10

15

20



25

30

35



40

T

e



m

per


at

ur

e (



°C

)

Rainfall (mm)



Max. temperature (°C)

Min. temperature (°C)

 

Figure 2.1 – Climatic Summary Data (Geraldton Airport) 

Rainfall  in  the  six  months  preceding  the  Section  5  survey  (August  2009)  was  251.4  mm,  62.5  mm 

below the long‐term mean for those months (Table 2.1).  During 2008, 22% less rain than the long‐

term mean was recorded at Geraldton Airport (BOM, 2009). 

Rainfall in the six months preceding the phase two transect survey for section 5 (October 2009) was 

357.8 mm, 26.2 mm less the long‐term mean for those months. 



 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

March 2010 



 

 

 



 

6

Table 2.1 – Rainfall Preceding the Section 5 Survey  (Geraldton Airport Records) 



Year 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Jul 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

Annual 

Total Monthly Rainfall (mm) 

2008 

0.0 


34.6 

6.6 


53.2 

14.2 


63.4 

108.4 


7.6 

38.4 


14.0 

3.6 


3.4 

347.4 


2009 

0.4 


0.6 

0.4 


1.2 

40.4 


117.4 

91.4 


63.6 

43.8 


10.4 

NA 


NA 

NA 


Mean Monthly Rainfall (mm) 

 

5.7 


11.0 

15.9 


24.1 

70.4 


100.1 

92.4 


64.5 

32.5 


19.2 

9.2 


5.4 

447.5 


Note:  Bold red font denotes survey month (i.e. Phase 1; Section 5 survey August 2009, Phase 2; Section 5 October 2009). **Mean monthly 

rainfall records: 1941 to 2009.  

Mullewa has a Mediterranean climate and its mean annual rainfall of 337.3 mm falls over 64 rainfall 

days.    Most  of  the  annual  rainfall  for  Mullewa  occurs  from  May  to  August  (64%),  with  214.9  mm 

falling over 39 rainfall days (Table 2.1).   

January is the hottest month with a mean maximum temperature of 36.7°C, while the coolest month 

is  July  with  mean  temperatures  ranging  from  a  maximum  of  18.7°C  to  a  minimum  of  7.0°C  (Figure 

2.2) (BOM, 2009). 

0

10

20



30

40

50



60

70

Jan



Feb

Mar


Apr

May


Jun

Jul


Aug

Sep


Oct

Nov


Dec

R

a



in

fa

ll (



m

m

)



0

5

10



15

20

25



30

35

40



T

em

per



at

ur

e (°C



)

Rainfall (mm)

Max. temperature (°C)

Min. temperature (°C)

 

Figure 2.2 



 Climatic Summary Data (Mullewa) 

Rainfall in the six months preceding the Section 3 and Section 4 surveys (April/May 2009) was 51.1 

mm, 28.1 mm below the long‐term mean for those months (Table 2.2).  However, during 2008, 14% 

more rain than the long‐term mean was recorded at Mullewa (BOM, 2009). 

Rainfall in the six months preceding the phase two transect survey for section 3 (September 2009) 

was 235.1 mm, 20.4 mm below the long‐term mean for those months and section 4 (October, 2009) 

was 265.2 mm, 7.1 mm above the long‐term mean for those months (Table 2.2) (BOM, 2009). 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

March 2010 



 

 

 



 

7

Table 2.2 – Rainfall Preceding the Section 3 and Section 4 Surveys (Mullewa Records) 



Year 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Jul 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

Annual 

Total Monthly Rainfall (mm) 

2008 

83.4 



16.6 

73.1 


3.7 

40.5 


95 

17.7 


23.8 

20.3 


2.4 

383.5 



2009 

10.2 


3.4 

7.8 




30.8 

100.3 


70.9 

25.3 


37.9 

3.6 

NA 


NA 

NA 


Mean Monthly Rainfall (mm)** 

 

13.1 


17.5 

19.1 


21.5 

47.2 


65.1 

60.7 


41.9 

21.7 


13.3 

8.7 


7.5 

337.3 


Note:  Bold red font denotes survey month (i.e. Phase 1; Section 3 and Section 4 surveys April ‐ May 2009, Phase 2; Section 3 = September 

2009 and Section 4 = October 2009).  **Mean monthly rainfall records: 1896 to 2009.  

The  Meekatharra  climate  is  described  as  dry  with  hot  summers  and  mild  winters,  and  is  strongly 

influenced by a band of high pressure known as the sub‐tropical ridge.  The ridge is located to the 

south for most of the year, occasionally moving close enough to enable cold fronts to pass over the 

area;  however,  most  cold  fronts  bring  little  rain.    The  reliable  rainfall  periods  are  associated  with 

tropical cloud bands from May to July (Figure 2.3). 

Mean annual rainfall for Meekatharra is 235.8 mm, although there is considerable variation in annual 

rainfall for the area.  The wettest summer month is February when a mean of 35.9 mm of rain falls, 

while June is the wettest winter month with 30.8 mm of rain (Figure 2.3). 

The hottest month is January with a mean maximum temperature of 38.3°C, however, hot, dry north‐

east to north‐west winds often result in temperatures above 41°C.  July temperatures range from a 

mean  maximum  of  19°C  to  a  mean  minimum  of  7.4°C,  and  the  overnight  temperature  may  drop 

below 5°C (Figure 2.3) (BOM, 2009). 

0

10

20



30

40

50



60

70

Jan



Feb

Mar


Apr

May


Jun

Jul


Aug

Sep


Oct

Nov


Dec

R

a



in

fa

ll (



m

m

)



0

5

10



15

20

25



30

35

40



T

em

per



at

ur

e (°C



)

Rainfall (mm)

Max. temperature (°C)

Min. temperature (°C)

 

Figure 2.3 – Climatic Summary Data (Meekatharra Airport) 

Rainfall in the six months preceding the phase one quadrat surveys for section 1 and section 2 (June 

2009)  was  70  mm,  78.6  mm  below  the  long‐term  mean  for  those  months  (Table  2.3).    However, 

during 2008, 28% more rain than the long‐term mean was recorded at Meekatharra Airport (BOM, 

2009). 

Rainfall in the six months preceding the phase two transect survey for section 1 (September 2009) 



was 55.6 mm, 81.6 mm below the long‐term mean for those months (Table 2.3) (BOM, 2009). 

 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

March 2010 



 

 

 



 

8

Table 2.3 – Rainfall Preceding the Section 1 and Section 2 Surveys (Meekatharra Aiport Records) 



Year 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 

Jul 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

Annual 

Total Monthly Rainfall (mm) 

2008 

5.4 


127.6 

57.2 


13.8 

2.2 


10.8 

16.8 


17.6 

6.2 



29.8 

14.8 


302.2 

2009 

28.8 


11.8 

2.6 


10 



18.6 

18.2 

4.2 


3.4 


NA 

NA 


NA 

Mean Monthly Rainfall (mm)** 

 

27.5 


35.9 

28.6 


20.9 

23.5 


30.8 

22 


11.4 

4.6 


6.4 

11.6 


12.2 

235.8 


Note:  Bold red font denotes survey month (i.e. Phase 1; Section 1 and Section 2 surveys = June 2009, Phase 2; Section 1 survey = 

September 2009).  **Mean monthly rainfall records from 1944 to 2009. 



2.2

 

GEOLOGY, LANDFORMS AND SOILS 

The  Project  Area  dissects  Beard’s  (1976)  Greenough  and  Murchison  Province.    The  Greenough 

Province  incorporates  the  Geraldton  Region,  which  describes  the  Freehold  land  area,  and  the 

Murchison Province incorporates the Upper Murchison and Yalgoo subregions, which describes the 

Pastoral land area. 

The geology, landforms and soils of these areas are discussed below. 



2.2.1

 

Geology, Landforms and Soils of the Freehold Land Area 

Playford  et  al.  (1970)  describe  four  main  physiographic  units  on  the  mainland  of  the  Geraldton 

region: the Victoria Plateau, the Greenough Flats, the river drainage systems, and the coastal belt.   

The Victoria Plateau is a gently undulating sandplain approximately 240 m above sea level.  Laterite is 

overlain by sand, and is exposed at dissected margins of the sandplain.  Sand dunes are present in 

some areas, and flat‐topped mesas have been formed by remnants of the plateau.  The Greenough 

Flats form the floodplain near the mouth of the Greenough River.  The river drainage systems include 

the Greenough, Chapman, Hutt and Bowes Rivers.  The coastal belt unit includes a band of coastal 

limestone and sand dunes. 

Tille  (2006)  describes  the  Greenough  Province,  which  incorporates  part  of  Beard  &  Burn’s  (1976) 

Geraldton  area,  as  a  “laterised  plateau  (dissected  at  the  fringes)  on  the  sedimentary  rocks  of  the 

Perth Basin and gneiss of the Northampton Complex”, with soils of “yellow deep sands and pale deep 

sands, with some gravelly pale deep sands and red‐brown hardpan shallow loams”. 

2.2.2

 

Geology, Landforms and Soils of the Pastoral Land Area 

The  Murchison  Province,  which  incorporates  Beard’s  (1976)  Murchison  region,  is  described  by  Tille 

(2006) as an area of “hardpan wash plains and sandplains (with some stony plains, hills, mesas and 

salt lakes) on the granitic rocks and greenstone of the Yilgarn Craton”.  While the soils are described 

as “red loamy earths, red sandy earths, red shallow loams, red deep sands and red‐brown hardpan 

shallow loams (with some red shallow sands and red shallow sandy duplexes)” (Tille, 2006). 

Most  of  the  western  boundary  of  the  Yilgarn  Block  was  formed  by  the  Darling  Fault  (Beard,  1976).  

The  Perth  Basin  lies  to  the  west  of  the  Yilgarn  Block  and  contains  mostly  sedimentary  rocks  of 

sandstone  and  shale.    The  Northampton  Block  is  a  formation  of  the  Perth  Basin,  composed  of 

substantially metamorphosed rocks; granulites and some felspathic quartzite; large granite intrusions 

are also evident. 

The  geology  of  Beard’s  (1976)  Murchison  region  is  dominated  by  the  Archaean  Yilgarn  Block  (also 

known as the Yilgarn Craton), which forms the  nucleus of the  Western Australian Shield.   Gneisses 

and  granites  are  the  major  components  of  the  Yilgarn  Block,  with  minor  infolded  belts  of 

metamorphic sedimentary and igneous rocks.  Metamorphic rocks are composed of various volcanic 


 

 

 


1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə