Oakajee port and rail opr rail development vegetation and flora assessment



Yüklə 8.07 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə13/74
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü8.07 Mb.
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   74

Freehold Transect 

Survey 

Aug & Sept 2009 

‐ 

301 


48 

124 


22 (7.3) 

279 (92.7) 



Pastoral Transect 

Survey 

Sept 2009 & March 

2010 

‐ 

172 



36 

69 


32 (18.7) 

140 (81.3) 

The  families  represented  by  the  greatest  number  of  taxa  in  the  combined  species  list  were  the 

Fabaceae  (151  taxa),  Myrtaceae  (125  taxa),  Asteraceae  (63  taxa),  Poaceae  (61  taxa)  and 

Scrophulariaceae  (58  taxa).    Genera  represented  by  the  greatest  number  of  taxa  were  Acacia  (87 

taxa), Eremophila (56 taxa), Grevillea (32 taxa), Eucalyptus (25 taxa) and Melaleuca (21 taxa). 



 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

72

The  families  and  genera  represented  by  the  greatest  number  of  taxa  and  the  most  frequently 



recorded species in the Pastoral and Freehold sections of the Study Area during the quadrat surveys 

are listed in Table 5.3. 



Table 5.3 



 Most Frequently Recorded Families, Genera and Taxa in the Study Area 

Land Area 

Surveyed 

Most Common Families 

Most Common Genera 

Most Frequently Recorded Taxa 

Freehold 

M

YRTACEAE



 (74 taxa) 

F

ABACEAE



 (65 taxa) 

A

STERACEAE



 (48 taxa) 

P

ROTEACEAE



 (34 taxa) 

P

OACEAE



 (24 taxa) 

Acacia (39 taxa) 

Melaleuca (18 taxa) 

Eucalyptus (15 taxa) 

Grevillea (14 taxa) 

Eremophila (9 taxa)  

*Erodium cygnorum (59 records) 

*Avena fatua (49 records) 

*Arctotheca calendula (47 records) 

*Lawrencia davenportii (45 records) 

Enchylaena tomentosa (38 records) 

Pastoral 

F

ABACEAE



 (79 taxa) 

S

CROPHULARIACEAE



 (41 

taxa) 


P

OACEAE


 (40 taxa) 

C

HENOPODIACEAE



 (33 taxa) 

M

YRTACEAE



 (24 taxa) 

Acacia (51 taxa) 

Eremophila (40 taxa) 

Senna (20 taxa) 

Maireana (14 taxa) 

Grevillea and Ptilotus (12 

taxa each) 



Aristida contorta (314 records) 

Acacia tetragonophylla (306 records) 

Ptilotus obovatus (280 records) 

Solanum lasiophyllum (236 records) 

Acacia ramulosa var. linophylla (163 records) 

Species richness is often affected by the location of the quadrat in the landscape.  Freehold quadrats 

with  high  species  richness  were  in  areas  associated  with  mesa  slopes  and  floodplains,  while  those 

areas  having  low  species  richness  in  the  Freehold  were  degraded  low  hilltops,  creeklines  and  salt 

depressions.    Pastoral  quadrats  with  high  species  richness  were  recorded  in  areas  associated  with 

higher water availability, such as drainage lines and floodplains.  Pastoral quadrats with low species 

diversity were associated with exposed areas such as flat plains, hardpans and salt pans.   

Quadrats  having  the  highest  and  lowest  species  richness  in  the  Pastoral  and  Freehold  sections  are 

listed in Table 5.4. 

Table 5.4 



 Quadrats with the Highest and Lowest Species Richness 

Land Area 

Surveyed 

Highest Species Richness 

Lowest Species Richness 

Average Species Richness 

Per Quadrat 

Freehold 

E066 (55 species) 

E063 (48 species) 

E067 (44 species) 

E110 (39 species) 

E092 and E054 (34 species each) 

E099 (6 species) 

E009, E059 and E122 (7 species 

each) 

E049 and E080 (8 species each) 



20.76 

Pastoral 

A122 (37 species) 

A140 (29 species) 

C175 and C112 (28 species each) 

A033 and B074 (27 species each) 

C145 and A020 (26 species each) 

B089 (3 species) 

A057, B088, B035, B017, B001, 

C133, D004 and D011 (4 species 

each) 


A089, B099, B033, B005, C147, 

A049, D149 (5 species each) 

12.51 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

73

5.2



 

SAMPLING ADEQUACY 

Species  accumulation  curves  (SAC)  provide  a  theoretical  basis  for  understanding  the  relationship 

between  sampling  effort  and  the  accumulation  of  species,  and  therefore  provide  a  means  of 

estimating  survey  adequacy.    As  sampling  effort  increases  with  a  corresponding  increase  in  survey 

area  and  time,  the  rate  at  which  new  species  are  recorded  is  reduced  and  the  number  of  species 

recorded levels out (i.e. becomes asymptotic).  At this point, where there is a diminishing return with 

regards to increase in species richness with sampling effort, the survey size is deemed sufficient. 

5.2.1

 

Sampling Adequacy for the Freehold Land Area 

Flora  sampling  adequacy  was  estimated  using  SAC  analysis  (Colwell,  2006)  (Figure  5.1)  and 

extrapolation of the curve to the asymptote using Michaelis‐Menten modelling.  Using this analysis, 

the  incidence‐based  coverage  estimator  of  species  richness  (ICE  Mean,  Chao  2  Mean)  was 

determined as 580.  As 450 taxa were recorded from the Freehold quadrats surveyed, this suggests 

that  approximately  77%  of  the  flora  species  potentially  present  within  the  Freehold  section  of  the 

Study Area were recorded during the survey. 

0

50



100

150


200

250


300

350


400

450


500

1

11



21

31

41



51

61

71



81

91

101



111

121


No. of Sites

No

. o

f S

p

ec

ie

s

 

Figure 5.1 





 Average Randomised SAC for the Freehold Land Area 

However, the data used for these calculations includes only those species recorded in the quadrats 

surveyed  in  the  Freehold  section;  they  do  not  include  any  opportunistic  collections  made  in  this 

section.  When the additional 191 taxa collected opportunistically during the Freehold quadrat and 

transect  surveys  are  added  to  the  total,  641  taxa  were  recorded.    This  total  suggests  that 

approximately 110% of the flora species potentially present within the Freehold section of the Study 

Area were recorded during the survey. 

5.2.2

 

Sampling Adequacy for the Pastoral Land Area 

Flora  sampling  adequacy  was  estimated  using  SAC  analysis  (Colwell,  2006)  (Figure  5.2)  and 

extrapolation of the curve to the asymptote using Michaelis‐Menten modelling.  Using this analysis, 

the  incidence‐based  coverage  estimator  of  species  richness  (ICE  Mean,  Chao  2  Mean)  was 

determined as 528.  As 429 taxa were recorded from the Pastoral quadrats surveyed, this suggests 

that  approximately  81%  of  the  flora  species  potentially  present  within  the  Pastoral  section  were 

recorded during the survey. 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

74

0



50

100


150

200


250

300


350

400


450

500


1

51

101



151

201


251

301


351

401


451

No. of Sites

N

o

. of Speci

es

 

Figure 5.2 





 Average Randomised SAC for the Pastoral Land Area 

However, the data used for these calculations includes only those species recorded in the quadrats 

surveyed in the Pastoral section of the Study Area; they do not include any opportunistic collections 

made  in  this  section.    When  the  91  additional  taxa  collected  opportunistically  during  the  Pastoral 

quadrat and transect surveys are added to the total, 520 taxa were recorded.  This total suggests that 

approximately 98% of the flora species potentially present within the Pastoral land area of the Study 

Area were recorded during the survey. 

5.3

 

FLORA OF CONSERVATION SIGNIFICANCE 

5.3.1

 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 

Flora  species  are  protected  at  a  National  level  under  the  Commonwealth  EPBC  Act.    The  EPBC  Act 

contains  a  list  of  species  that  are  considered  either  ‘Critically  Endangered’,  ‘Endangered’, 

‘Vulnerable’,  ‘Conservation  Dependent’,  ‘Extinct’  or  ‘Extinct  in  the  Wild’  (for  category  definitions 

refer to Table K.1, Appendix K). 

The database searches show that 10 species protected by this Act potentially occur in the vicinity of 

the Study Area.  These species and their EPBC Act categories are listed in Table 5.5.  Their likelihood 

of occurrence and preferred habitat type are listed in Table 5.6. 



Table 5.5 



 Species Protected by the EPBC Act Recorded Within a 2 km Buffer of the Study Area 

EPBC Act Category 

Family 

Taxa 

Recorded in the Study Area 

Endangered 

O

RCHIDACEAE



 

Caladenia hoffmanii 

Confirmed by current survey 

and DEC records 

O

RCHIDACEAE



 

Caladenia wanosa 

‐ 

F



ABACEAE

 

Chorizema humile 

‐ 

R

UTACEAE



 

Drummondita ericoides 

Confirmed by DEC records 

S

CROPHULARIACEAE



 

Eremophila viscida 

‐ 

R



UTACEAE

 

Philotheca wonganensis 

Confirmed by DEC records 

A

STERACEAE



 

Schoenia filifolia subsp. subulifolia 

‐ 

C



OLCHICACEAE

 

Wurmbea tubulosa 

‐ 

Vulnerable 



O

RCHIDACEAE

 

Caladenia bryceana subsp. cracens 

‐ 

M



YRTACEAE

 

Eucalyptus blaxellii 

Confirmed by current survey 

and DEC records 



 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

75

Two  species  listed  under  the  EPBC  Act  were  recorded  during  the  ecologia  survey:  Caladenia 



hoffmanii  (Endangered)  and  Eucalyptus  blaxellii  (Vulnerable).    The  biological  characteristics  and 

known distributions of these taxa are provided below. 



Caladenia hoffmanii (ORCHIDACEAE) – Endangered 

Caladenia  hoffmanii  (Plate  5.1  and  Plate  5.2)  is  a  tuberous  perennial  herb  growing  from  0.13  m  to 

0.3 m high.  The flowers of this spider orchid are produced from August to October and are green, 

yellow  and  red.    Long,  fine  hairs  grow  along  the  bracts,  leaves  and  stems.    Caladenia  hoffmanii  is 

generally found growing on clay‐loam soils, laterite and granite rocky outcrops, ridges, swamps and 

gullies (WAHERB, January 2010). 

Fifteen  plants  of  Caladenia  hoffmanii  was  recorded  at  two  locations  (separated  50  m  apart)  in  the 

Freehold section of the Study Area.  The coordinates for the sites at which this DRF was recorded are 

and listed in Table G.1 and have been mapped on Figure G.1 (Appendix G). 

The conservation significance of this taxon is provided in Section 0. 

 

Plate 5.1 





 Caladenia hoffmanii 

(Photography by A.P.Brown, S.D. Hopper & S.J. Patrick.  Image used with the permission of the Western Australian Herbarium, Department 

of Environment and Conservation (http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/help/copyright).  Accessed on Wednesday, 2 December 2009). 

 

Plate 5.2 





 Caladenia hoffmanii (photography: ecologia

 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

76

Eucalyptus blaxellii (MYRTACEAE) ‐ Vulnerable 



Eucalyptus blaxellii (Plate 5.3) is one of four species in the Loxophlebae series of the Eucalyptus.  It is 

characterised  by  having  buds  with  fully  inflexed  stamens,  geniculate  (strongly  elbowed)  staminal 

filaments and a style that tapers basally.  The leaves are sparsely reticulate, and the adult leaves are 

glossy green.  The fruit is small and obconical in shape.  One of the four species within this series is 

the very common Eucalyptus loxophleba.  Eucalyptus blaxellii is distinguished from E. loxophleba by 

smooth bark and a mallee growth habit (Johnson & Hill, 1992). 

Four‐hundred and thirty‐three plants of Eucalyptus blaxellii was recorded at 44 locations (separated 

50  m  apart)  in  the  Freehold  section  of  the  Study  Area.    The  coordinates  for  the  sites  at  which  this 

vulnerable, Priority 4 taxon was recorded are listed in Table G.1 and have been mapped on Figure G.1 

(Appendix G). 

The conservation significance of this taxon is provided in Section 0. 

 

Plate 5.3 





 Eucalyptus blaxellii (photography: ecologia

An  additional  two  species listed  under  the  EPBC  Act  were  recorded  by  the  DEC  database  searches: 



Philotheca  wonganensis  (Endangered)  and  Drummondita  ericoides  (Endangered).    The  biological 

characteristics and known distributions of these taxa are provided below. 



Philotheca wonganensis (RUTACEAE) – Endangered 

Philotheca wonganensis (Plate 5.4) is an erect shrub, growing to 0.3–1 m in height.  The flowers are 

white,  pink,  occurring  from  August  to  October.    Philotheca  wonganensis  is  commonly  found  in  red 

sandy soils. 

Twelve plants of Philotheca wonganensis has been recorded at two locations (separated 50 m apart) 

in the Freehold section of the Study Area by the DEC searches.  


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

77

 



Plate 5.4 



 Philotheca wonganensis 

Photography by K. Bettink & K. Dixon. Image used with the permission of the Western Australian Herbarium, Department of Environment 

and Conservation (http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/help/copyright). Accessed on Monday, 17 May 2010. 

Drummondita ericoides (RUTACEAE) – Endangered 

Drummondita ericoides (Plate 5.4) is a divaricately branched shrub, growing to 0.3 – 1 m in height.  

The flowers are yellow, white, violet to purple, and occur from September to October.  Drummondita 



ericoides occurs on rocky coastline areas. 

Ten plants of Drummondita ericoides has been recorded at four locations (separated 50 m apart) in 

the Freehold section of the Study Area by the DEC searches.  

 

Plate 5.5 



 Drummondita ericoides 

Photography by S.D. Hopper & S.F. Patrick. Image used with the permission of the Western Australian Herbarium, Department of 

Environment and Conservation (http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/help/copyright). Accessed on Monday, 17 May 2010. 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

78

5.3.2



 

Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 

Conservation  significance  in  Western  Australia  is  determined  under  the  WC  Act.    Currently,  DRF 

species are protected under the Western Australian Wildlife Conservation (Rare Flora) Notice 2008(2) 

of the WC Act.  This notice lists flora taxa that are extant and considered likely to become extinct or 

rare.  They are defined as “taxa which have been adequately searched for and deemed to be either 

rare, in danger of extinction, or otherwise in need of special protection in the wild”.  These taxa are 

legally  protected  and  their  removal  or  impact  to  their  surroundings  cannot  be  conducted  without 

Ministerial approval,  obtained  specifically  on  each  occasion  for  each  population  (refer  to  Table  K.2 

(Appendix K) for category definitions).  

A  search  of  the  DEC’s  DRF  database  indicated  that  12  DRF  taxa  have  been  recorded  within  a  2 km 

buffer  of  the  Study  Area.    These  species  and  their  preferred  habitats  are  listed  in  Table  5.6,  along 

with  a  comment  on  the  probability  of  each  species  being  located  within  the  Study  Area  based  on 

habitat preference. 

Table 5.6 



 DRF Taxa Protected by the WC Act Recorded Within a 2 km Buffer of the Study Area 

Family 

Taxa 

Preferred Habitat 

Likelihood of 

Occurrence in the 

Study Area 

O

RCHIDACEAE



 

Caladenia bryceana subsp. cracens 

Sand over limestone, in low heath on 

limestone hills, or on winter‐moist 

flats 


Possible 

O

RCHIDACEAE



 

Caladenia hoffmanii 

Clay, loam, laterite and granite.  Rocky 

outcrops and hillsides, ridges, swamps 

and gullies. 

Confirmed by 

current survey 

O

RCHIDACEAE



 

Caladenia wanosa 

Sandstone outcrops, top edges of 

gorges. 

Possible 

P

APILIONACEAE



 

Chorizema humile 

Sandy clay or loam plains. 

Possible 

R

UTACEAE



 

Drummondita ericoides 

Rocky coastline areas 

Confirmed by DEC 

records 


S

CROPHULARIACEAE

  Eremophila viscida 

Granitic soils, sandy loam.  Stony 

gullies, sandplains. 

Possible 

P

ROTEACEAE



 

Grevillea bracteosa subsp. bracteosa 

Lateritic and granitic soils.  Yellow and 

brown sands. 

Possible 

P

ROTEACEAE



 

Grevillea bracteosa subsp. 

howatharra 

Gravelly clay over limestone 

Possible 

P

ROTEACEAE



 

Grevillea phanerophlebia 

Gravelly soil, sand, loam, or clay; 

occupying heathland. 

Possible 

R

UTACEAE


 

Philotheca wonganensis 

Red sandy soils 

Confirmed by DEC 

records 


A

STERACEAE

 

Schoenia filifolia subsp. subulifolia 

Pale yellow‐grey‐brown clay.  Swampy 

flats, tops of breakaways, crabholes. 

Possible 

C

OLCHICACEAE



 

Wurmbea tubulosa 

Clay, loam.  River banks, seasonally‐

wet places. 

Possible 

Currently,  73  DRF  taxa  are  listed  as  occurring  in  the  Geraldton  Sandplains  region,  11  in  the  Yalgoo 

region and 1 in the Murchison region (WAHERB, April, 2010). 

One DRF taxon; Caladenia hoffmanii was recorded in the Study Area during the current survey and is 

protected  by  the  WC  Act.    An  additional  two  DRF  taxa;  Drummondita  ericoides  and  Philotheca 



wonganensis were recorded in the Study Area by the DEC database searches.  These are described in 

section 5.3.1.   



 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

79

5.3.3



 

Priority Flora 

The  DEC  maintains  a  list  of  Priority  Flora  taxa,  which  are  considered  poorly  known,  uncommon  or 

under  threat  but  for  which  there  is  insufficient  justification,  based  on  known  distribution  and 

population sizes, for inclusion on the DRF schedule.  A Priority Flora taxon is assigned to one of four 

priority categories (Atkins (2), 2008) as defined in Table K.3, Appendix K. 

Currently, 507 Priority Flora taxa are listed as occurring in the Geraldton Sandplains regions, 97 in the 

Yalgoo region and 150 in the Murchison region (WAHERB, April, 2010). 

1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   74


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə