Oakajee port and rail opr rail development vegetation and flora assessment



Yüklə 8.07 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə19/74
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü8.07 Mb.
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   74

*Carthamus lanatus (A

STERACEAE

) – Declared Plant 

*Carthamus lanatus (Saffron Thistle) is an erect, spiny annual growing to 70 cm in height (WAHERB, 

December 2009).  The leaves are rigid and have spiny lobes, and the yellow flower heads (produced 

from spring to summer) are surrounded by spiny bracts and are borne in terminal clusters (Plate 5.8). 

Originating from southern Europe, it is now distributed in Western Australia from the south coast to 

Geraldton,  and  inland  to  Kalgoorlie  (Hussey  et  al.,  2007).    This  species  was  recorded  twice  in  the 

Pastoral land area and once in the Freehold land area. 

*Carthamus lanatus is listed as a Priority 1 Declared Plant in Western Australia, which prohibits the 

movement  of  plants  or  their  seeds  within  the  State.    It  is  also  listed  as  a  Priority  4  weed  in  the 

Murchison region; this listing aims to prevent the infestation spreading beyond existing boundaries 

(DAF, 2009).  The Priority 4 requirements state that the infested area must be managed in such a way 

as to prevent the spread of seeds or plant parts within and from the property.   

 

Plate 5.8 



 *Carthamus lanatus 

 (Photography by S. Williamson & R. Knox.  Image used with the permission of the Western Australian Herbarium, Department of 

Environment and Conservation (http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/help/copyright). Accessed on Saturday, 5 December 2009). 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

112


*Echium plantagineum (P

OLYGONACEAE

) – Declared Plant 

*Echium  plantagineum  (Paterson’s  Curse)  is  an  erect,  bristly  annual,  growing  to  0.1  m  to  0.6  m  in 

height (WAHERB, December 2009).  The numerous flowers are produced from September to January 

and are generally blue or purple, but can also be pink and white.  The deep‐veined, hairy and broad 

leaves form rosettes, and in late winter to spring a branched shoot system forms which carries the 

flowers  (Plate  5.9).    Originating  from  southern  Europe,  it  is  now  widely  distributed  throughout 

agricultural  land  in  south‐west  Australia  particularly  in  the  Geraldton  Sandplains,  Avon  Wheatbelt 

and Swan Coastal Plain Bioregions (Hussey et al., 2007).  This species was recorded at seven locations 

in the Freehold land area. 

*Echium plantagineum is listed as a Priority 1 Declared Plant in Western Australia and this prohibits 

the movement of plants or their seeds within the State.  It is also listed as a Priority 3 and Priority 4 

weed in the wheatbelt, and these listings respectively aim to control an infestation by reducing the 

area  and/or  density  of  the  infestation  and  to  prevent  the  infestation  from  spreading  beyond  the 

existing  boundaries  of  the  infestation  (DAF,  December  2009).    The  Priority  3  and  Priority  4 

requirements state that the infested area must be managed in such a way as to prevent the spread of 

seeds or plant parts within and from the property.  . 

 

Plate 5.9 



 *Echium plantagineum 

 (Photography by J. Dodd & R. Knox.  Image used with the permission of the Western Australian Herbarium, Department of Environment 

and Conservation (http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/help/copyright). Accessed on Saturday, 5 December 2009). 

*Emex australis (B

ORAGINACEAE

) – Declared Plant 

*Emex australis (Doublegee) is a hairless, prostrate annual plant, growing to 0.1 m to 0.6 m in height 

(WAHERB, December 2009).  The green flowers are produced in winter as clusters in the leaf axils.  

The woody fruit has three rigid spines and the leaves are ovate (Plate 5.10).  Originating from South 

Africa,  it  is  now  widely  distributed  throughout  agricultural  and  waste  land  in  south‐west  Australia 

particularly  in  the  Geraldton  Sandplains  and  Avon  Wheatbelt  (Hussey  et  al.,  2007;  WAHERB, 

December 2009).  This species was recorded at seven locations in the Freehold land area. 

*Emex australis is listed as a Priority 1 Declared Plant in certain regions in the south‐west of Western 

Australia, which prohibits the movement of plants or their seeds within those regions.  It is also listed 

as  a  Priority  3  and  Priority  4  weed,  and  these  listings  respectively  aim  to  control  an  infestation  by 

reducing  the  area  and/or  density  of  the  infestation  and  to  prevent  the  infestation  from  spreading 

beyond  the  existing  boundaries  of  the  infestation  (DAF,  December  2009).    The  Priority  3  and  4 

requirements state that the infested area must be managed in such a way as to prevent the spread of 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

113


seeds or plant parts within and from the property.  The Priority 5 requirements state that infestations 

on public land must be controlled.   

 

Plate 5.10 



 *Emex australis 

(Photography by J. Dodd, R. Knox & Anon.  Image used with the permission of the Western Australian Herbarium, Department of 

Environment and Conservation (http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/help/copyright). Accessed on Saturday, 5 December 2009). 

5.4.2

 

Weeds of National Significance 

The Australian Weeds Strategy (Australian Weeds Committee, 2006) defines a weed as “a plant that 

requires  some  form  of  action  to  reduce  the  harmful  effects  on  the  economy,  the  environment, 

human  health  and  amenity”.    Weeds  that  have  proliferated  in  bushland  without  direct  human 

intervention or assistance are also referred to as naturalised alien species. 

The Weed Plan for Western Australia (State Weed Plan Steering Group, 2001) outlines 20 Weeds of 

National Significance.  None of these species were recorded in the Study Area. 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

114


This page has been left intentionally blank 

 

 



 

 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

115


6

 

SURVEY LIMITATIONS AND CONSTRAINTS 

According  to  the  EPA  Guidance  Statement  for  Terrestrial  Flora  and  Vegetation  Surveys  for 

Environmental  Impact  Assessment  in  Western  Australia  (EPA,  2004a),  vegetation  and  flora  surveys 

may be constrained by several aspects. 

 

Scope (i.e. the influence in terms of reference, such as what life forms etc. were sampled); 



 

Proportion of flora collected and identified (based on sampling, timing and intensity); 



 

Sources of information (i.e. pre‐existing background versus new material); 



 

The proportion of the task achieved and further work which might be needed; 



 

Timing, weather, season and cycle; 



 

Disturbances (e.g. fire, flood, accidental human intervention, etc.); 



 

Intensity (i.e. in retrospect, was the intensity adequate?); 



 

Completeness (e.g. was the relevant area fully surveyed?); 



 

Resources (e.g. degree of expertise available in plant identification to taxon level); 



 

Access problems;  



 

Availability of contextual information; and 



 

Experience levels. 



These constraints are addressed with regards to the Study Area in Table 6.1 overleaf. 

 

 



 

 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

116


Table 6.1 



 Survey Limitations and Constraints 

Aspect 

Constraint 

Comment 

Sources of information 

and availability of 

contextual information 



(i.epre‐existing 

background versus new 

material) 

Negligible 

Beard (1976) and Beard & Burn’s (1976) mapped the vegetation of the Study Area at a scale of 1:000,000 and 1:250,000 respectively, however, at this 

scale the mapping is not very detailed.  More recently the land systems (Curry et al., 1994; Payne et al., 1998) and soil‐landscape systems (Rogers, 

1996) have been mapped and these provide a good source of regional information.  Other surveys that have been conducted close to the Study Area 

include EIA surveys at Weld Range, Jack Hills, Oakajee Port and Central Tallering Land System (Section 2.8); however, these surveys have focused on 

landforms that are not common along the Study Area.  Large sections of the Study Area have not been surveyed in detail before, and this report 

provides baseline vegetation and flora information on these areas. 

The scope (i.e. what life 

forms were sampled) 

None 

The vascular flora of the Study Area was sampled.  The survey scope was prepared in consultation with the relevant government agencies (via OPR), 



and was designed to comply with EPA requirements. 

Proportion of flora 

collected and identified 

(based on sampling, 

timing and intensity) 

None 


6,864 specimens were collected during the survey of the Study Area (3430 specimens were collected from the Pastoral section and 2199 from the 

Freehold section during the quadrat survey, with a further 1,235 collected during the threatened flora survey) and the following identifications were 

made from these specimens. 

Taxa identified to species, subspecies and variety: 1016, of these 220 (21.7%) were annuals. 

Identified to family only: 8, Identified to genus only: 52. 

A species accumulation curve analysis indicates 110% of the total flora was recorded in the Freehold land area and 98% in the Pastoral land area. 

Completeness and 

further work which 

might be needed (e.g. 

was the relevant area 

fully surveyed) 

Moderate 

Aerial photographs were used to select quadrat locations.  This ensured that all areas displaying potentially different or unique vegetation units were 

visited during the survey.  In addition, the botanists undertaking the survey ground‐truthed the vegetation associations occurring in the sites chosen 

from the aerial photographs, and added or removed sites depending on the vegetation encountered while traversing the Study Area. 

Given the length and width of the Study Area, and that the quadrats were targeted in the vegetation units along the centreline, it is likely that small 

uncommon vegetation units, indistinguishable from aerial photography, and occurring away from the proposed alignment will not have been sampled.  

The Study Area incorporates some of the hilly areas at both Weld Range and Jack Hills.  The vegetation units in these areas are probably more diverse 

than what has been mapped, but as the rail is unlikely to impact the hills, quadrats were not focused in these areas making it difficult to accurately 

map them.  However, these areas have been intensely surveyed and mapped by other EIA surveys carried out by the respective mine proponents. 

Mapping reliability 

Negligible 

Good aerial imagery was used to select sites and to reliably map the vegetation of most of the Study Area.  However, aerial imagery available for a 

40 km section of the Study Area through Yuin station was of poor quality and the mapping reliability will be slightly lower in this section.  One quadrat 

per linear kilometre was pre selected before each field survey.  This number is believed to be adequate to determine the vegetation of the 4 km wide 

corridor in the Pastoral and 3.2 km wide corridor in the Freehold, as the vegetation is relatively uniform along most of the Study Area.  The areas that 

were more diverse (e.g. Moresby Range and salt lake communities) were more intensely surveyed.  Also, any uncommon vegetation communities, that 

were not visible on the aerial photographs, and that were encountered during the survey were opportunistically sampled. 



 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

117


Aspect 

Constraint 

Comment 

Timing/weather/season

/ cycle 

Negligible 

Rainfall recorded at Meekatharra in the six months preceding the phase one quadrat survey along Sections 1 and 2 in the Pastoral land area (June 

2009) was 70 mm; this was 78.6 mm less than the long‐term mean for the same six months.  However, during 2008, 28% more rain than the long‐term 

mean was recorded at Meekatharra Airport.  Rainfall in the six months preceding the phase two transect survey for section 1 (September 2009) was 

55.6 mm, 81.6 mm below the long‐term mean for those months and section 2 (March, 2010) was 21.8 mm, 100.4 mm below the long term average. 

Rainfall recorded at Mullewa in the six months preceding the phase one quadrat survey along Sections 2 and 4 in the Pastoral land area (April/May 

2009) was 51.1 mm; this was 28.1 mm less than the long‐term mean for the same six months.  However, during 2008, 14% more rain than the long‐

term mean was recorded at Mullewa.  Rainfall in the six months preceding the phase two transect survey for section 3 (September 2009) was 235.1 

mm, 20.4 mm below the long‐term mean for those months and section 4 (October, 2009) was 265.2 mm, 7.1 mm above the long‐term mean for those 

months. 

Rainfall recorded at Geraldton Airport in the six months preceding the phase one quadrat survey along the Freehold section (Section 1, August 2009) 

was 251.4 mm; this is 62.5 mm less than the long‐term mean for the same six months.  During 2008, 22% less rain than the long‐term mean was 

recorded at Geraldton Airport.  Rainfall in the six months preceding the phase two transect survey for section 5 (October 2009) was 357.8 mm, 26.2 

mm less the long‐term mean for those months. 

Disturbances (e.g. fire, 

flood, accidental human 

intervention) 

None 

Farming has affected the condition of the vegetation in the Freehold section of the Study Area.  Factors affecting the vegetation condition include; 



clearing of land, the introduction of weeds and the proliferation of species that are resistant to grazing and salinity.  As a result, remnants in good 

condition were targeted in this section of the Study Area.  Recent, low intensity and localised fires had occurred in small patches of vegetation.  This 

did not affect the vegetation mapping, as nearby, unburnt patches of similar vegetation were surveyed. 

Intensity (in retrospect, 

was the intensity 

adequate?) 

None 

Approximately one quadrat per 0.91 km was surveyed along the length of the Study Area (605 ecologia quadrats and 9 Weld Range quadrats over 



approximately 560 km).  This was adequate to map the vegetation communities of the Study Area.  During the second phase transect survey 1,250 km 

(2,364 ha) of transects were walked, equating to 1.05% of the total Study Area. 

Resources  

None 


Resources were adequate for the botanical survey, as 141 person days were invested in the field during the quadrat surveys and 103 person days 

during the targeted threatened flora surveys. 

Access problems 

Moderate 

All sections of the Study Area were accessible on foot; however, some areas of the Moresby Range were very densely vegetated and they were 

impenetrable. 

One patch of remnant vegetation in the Freehold section of the Study Area could not be surveyed as the owners denied access to the property.  While 

aerial photographs indicate that similar vegetation occurs in the quadrats surveyed close by, the actual species composition is not known. 

Experience levels (e.g. 

degree of expertise in 

plant identification to 

taxon level) 

None 

The field botanists on the surveys had between one and four years of experience in conducting botanical surveys of this type and in the Gascoyne and 



Murchison bioregions.  Plant specimens were collected from each quadrat surveyed for verification by a plant taxonomist.  The plant taxonomists have 

had between 2 and 15 years of experience of identifying the flora of Western Australia, and challenging specimens were identified with the help of 

experts at the Western Australian Herbarium.  The project was overseen by the principle botanist with 19 years of experience in surveys of this kind. 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

118


This page has been left blank intentionally 

 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

119


7

 

VEGETATION COMMUNITIES CONSERVATION ASSESSMENT 

The  significance  of  the  vegetation  of  the  Study  Area  has  been  assessed  at  four  spatial  scales; 

national, state, regional and local. 

Conservation significance is being calculated for the whole Study Area.  The actual impact from the 

proposed  rail  alignment  will  be  discussed  in  a  separate  document  in  the  OPR  Rail  Public 

Environmental Review. 



7.1

 

VEGETATION OF NATIONAL SIGNIFICANCE 

National  significance  refers  to  those  features  of  the  environment  which  are  recognised  under 

legislation as being of importance to the Australian community.  TECs listed under the EPBC Act are 

regarded as nationally significant. 

No TECs of national significance were recorded in the Study Area. 

7.2

 

VEGETATION OF STATE SIGNIFICANCE 

State  significance  refers  to  those  features  of  the  environment  that  are  recognised  under  State 

legislation as being of importance to the Western Australian community, in particular, communities 

listed as PECs.  Ecological communities with insufficient information available to be considered a TEC, 

or which are rare but not currently threatened, are placed on the Priority list and referred to as PECs; 

four Priority 1 state‐listed PECs were recorded in the Study Area and are of state significance. 

A Priority 1 PEC is defined as a poorly known ecological community with apparently few and small 

occurrences,  with  all  or  most  not  actively  managed  for  conservation  (e.g.  within  agricultural  or 

Pastoral  lands,  urban  areas  and  active  mineral  leases)  and  for  which  current  threats  exist.  

Communities may be included if they are comparatively well known from one or more localities but 

do not meet adequacy of survey requirements, and/or are not well defined, and appear to be under 

immediate  threat from known threatening  processes across their range.   The PECs recorded in the 

Study Area include: 

1.

 



Jack  Hills  vegetation  complexes  (Banded  Ironstone  Formation);  associated  with  vegetation 

communities; Mh1, Mh2, Mh3, Mh4 and Mc3.  These communities are restricted to Jack Hills 

and are significant. 

2.

 



Plant  assemblages  of  the  Moresby  Range  system;  associated  with  vegetation  communities; 

Gh1,  Gh2  and  Gh3.    These  communities  are  restricted  to  the  Moresby  Range  and  are 

significant. 

3.

 



Tallering  Peak  vegetation  complexes;  associated  with  vegetation  communities  Yh1  and  Yp2.  

Yh1  is  restricted  to  the  Tallering  land  system  and  is  significant,  whereas  Yp2  is  more 

widespread in the local area and is not significant. 

4.

 



Weld Range vegetation complexes (Banded Ironstone Formation); associated with vegetation 

communities; Mh5, Mh6, Mh7, Mh8, Mc3 and Mc4.  These communities were restricted to the 

Weld Range and are significant. 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Proposal – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

120


7.3

 

VEGETATION OF REGIONAL SIGNIFICANCE 

Regional  significance  addresses  the  representation  of  species  and  habitats  at  a  biogeographic 

regional  level.    Species  or  habitat  types  that  are  endemic  to  the  Geraldton  Sandplains,  Yalgoo  and 

Murchison  bioregions  and  whose  distributions  are  limited  or  unknown  are  considered  regionally 

significant. 

Regional  conservation  significance  of  the  vegetation  communities  of  the  Study  Area  has  been 

assessed  based  upon  two  sources  of  information;  land  systems  and  Beards  vegetation  mapping  of 

the  Study  Area.    These  are  the  only  wide  scale  mapping  projects  that  have  been  carried  out  in 

Western Australia and are a means of determining regional significance. 

1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   74


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə