Oakajee port and rail opr rail development vegetation and flora assessment



Yüklə 8.07 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/74
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü8.07 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   74

APPENDICES 

Appendix A  Definition of Codes for Threatened and Priority Ecological Communities ..................... 195 

Appendix B  Biological Surveys Conducted in the Vicinity of the Study Area ..................................... 199 

Appendix C  Conservation Significant Flora Recorded During the DEC’s Database Searches and Other 

Biological Surveys in the Area ......................................................................................... 205 

Appendix D  Quadrat Locations and Vegetation Condition ................................................................ 217 

Appendix E  National Vegetation Information System Vegetation Classification .............................. 233 

Appendix F  Quadrat Information (Included Electronically) ............................................................... 237 

Appendix G  DRF and Priority Flora Locations and Maps and Species of Interest Locations .............. 241 

Appendix H  Vegetation Communities Recorded in the Study Area – Detailed Information ............. 300 

Appendix I  Vegetation Community Mapping of the Study Area ...................................................... 336 

Appendix J  Flora Taxa Recorded In the Study Area .......................................................................... 372 

Appendix K  Conservation Category Definitions ................................................................................. 396 

Appendix L  WAHERB DRF and Priority Flora Voucher Forms (Included Electronically) .................... 400 

Appendix M Priority Flora Locations Recorded During the ecologia Regional Surveys ...................... 404 

Appendix N  Introduced Flora Locations ............................................................................................. 408 

Appendix O  Control codes for Declared Weeds ................................................................................. 420 

Appendix P  Matrix  of  Priority  Flora  Taxa  That  has  been  Recorded  in  Each  Land  System  and 

Vegetation Community ................................................................................................... 424 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

vi

ACRONYMS 



ARRP Act 

Agriculture and Related Resources Protection Act 1976 

BIF 

 

Banded Ironstone Formation 



BOM   

Bureau of Meteorology 



CALM Act 

Conservation and Land Management Act 

DAF 

 

Department of Agriculture and Food 



DEC 

 

Department of Environment and Conservation 



DEFL 

 

The DEC’s Threatened (Declared Rare) Flora Database 



DEWHA  

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts 



DRF 

 

Declared Rare Flora 



EIA 

 

Environmental Impact Assessment 



EP Act   

Environment Protection Act 1986 



EPA 

 

Environmental Protection Authority 



EPBC Act 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 

IBRA 

 

Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia 



NVIS 

 

National Vegetation Information System 



OPR 

 

Oakajee Port and Rail 



PEC 

 

Priority Ecological Community 



SAC 

 

Species Accumulation Curve 



TEC 

 

Threatened Ecological Community 



WAHERB 

Western Australian Herbarium 



WC Act  

Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 

 

 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

vii


GLOSSARY OF TERMS 

Approved Port:  

The deepwater port located at Oakajee.  The Port was approved by the state government in 1998 by 

Ministerial Statement 469 and more recently updated by an approved 45C process. 

ecologia regional studies:  

Surveys  commissioned  by  OPR,  undertaken  by  ecologia,  on  previous  OPR  alignments.    Note  this  is 

only relevant for the Pastoral land area. 

Freehold land area:  

Land  that  is  permanently  owned  by  a  person  or  persons  and  is  not  the  subject  of  a  lease 

arrangement.  Within the Study Area this extends from Oakajee to the western boundary of Wandina 

Pastoral Station (approximately 145 km from the coast). 



Pastoral land area:  

Land that is the subject of a lease arrangement with the State Government of Western Australia, and 

the holder of the lease and is used for grazing livestock on native vegetation.  The Pastoral land area 

extends  from  the  western  boundary  of  Wandina  Pastoral  lease  (chainage  145 km)  to  Jack  Hills 

(chainage 560 km). 

Proposed alignment:  

The rail construction and operational footprint, being a much smaller area, completely located within 

the Study Area. 

The Study Area: 

The larger area surveyed for the purpose of biological studies (as presented in this document) and as 

presented in the PER and relevant Technical Appendices. 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

viii


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

Oakajee  Port  and  Rail  Pty  Ltd  (OPR)  propose  the  Oakajee  Rail  Development,  a  component  of  the 

larger Oakajee Port and Rail Development which also consists of the Oakajee  Port (Approved Port) 

and  the  Oakajee  Port  Terrestrial  Development  which  is  the  subject  of  a  separate  environmental 

impact assessment. 

The Study Area comprises the development of approximately 560 km of rail formation within a rail 

transport  corridor  from  mines  in  the  northern  mid‐west  to  an  export  port  at  Oakajee  located 

approximately 24 km north of Geraldton.  The mainline (of approximately 530 km) extends from the 

western boundary of Reserve 16200 near the North West Coastal Highway to Jack Hills mine in the 

north‐east.    In  addition,  the  Study  Area  includes  a  21  km  spur  to  connect  to  the  existing  WestNet 

(Mullewa) and a 10‐15 km spur to Weld Range.  The Mullewa spur will potentially connect mine sites 

to the south of Mullewa to the Oakajee Port.  The Study Area is 4 km in width through the Pastoral 

land area and 3.2 km in width through the Freehold land area. 

OPR  commissioned  ecologia  Environment  (ecologia)  to  undertake  a  biological  survey  of  the 

vegetation and flora of the Study Area. 

The  primary  objective  of  this  study  was  to  provide  sufficient  information  to  the  Environmental 

Protection Authority (EPA) to assess the impact of the rail corridor on the vegetation and flora of the 

area.  The EPA’s objectives with regards to management of native vegetation and flora are to: 

 

avoid  adverse  impacts  on  biological  diversity  comprising  the  different  plants  and  the 



ecosystems they form at the levels of genetic, species and ecosystem diversity; 

 



maintain  the  abundance,  species  diversity,  geographic  distribution  and  productivity  of 

vegetation communities; 

 

protect Declared Rare Flora (DRF) consistent with the provisions of the Wildlife Conservation 



Act 1950; and 

 



protect other flora species of conservation significance. 

A  two  phase,  Level  2  vegetation  and  flora  survey  was  undertaken  in  the  Study  Area.    Phase  one 

involved a quadrat sampling method to provide a detailed vegtation community map and a floristic 

species  list  for  the  Study  Area;  605  quadrats  were  surveyed  in  the  Study  Area  between  April  and 

August  2009.    An  additional  nine  quadrats  surveyed  by  ecologia  at  Weld  Range  (ecologia,  2009a) 

were included in the statistical analysis.  Phase two involved targeting threatened flora and unknown 

species  by  using  transects  to  cover  large  areas  of  the  Study  Area.    This  was  undertaken  between 

August and October 2009 and March 2010 where 1,250 km of transects were walked, covering 2,364 

ha or 1.05% of the Study Area. 

VEGETATION 

Seventy‐two  vegetation  communities,  incorporating  48  subunits  were  recorded  in  the  Study  Area.  

Vegetation  communities  were  separated  into  the  three  IBRA  regions  that  the  Study  Area  crosses, 

which included; the Geraldton Sandplains, Yalgoo and Murchison bioregions. 

The  dominant  vegetation  communities  of  the  Geraldton  Sandplains  region  were  characterised  by; 

isolated  Eucalyptus  loxophleba  low  trees,  over  mixed  Melaleuca  spp.  and  Hakea  spp.  open  mid 

shrublands,  over  mixed  Verticordia  spp.  open  low  shrublands  on  rocky  hill  slopes  of  the  Moresby 

Ranges;  mixed  Eucalyptus  spp,  Xylomelum  angustifolium,  Actinostrobus  arenarius  and  Banksia  spp. 

low  woodlands,  over  mixed  Acacia  spp.  and  Melaleuca  spp.  sparse  mid  shrublands  on  the  yellow 

sandplains  and  dunes;  Acacia  tetragonophylla  and  Hakea  recurva  open  tall  shrublands  on  the 

degraded low hill slopes and flats; Eucalyptus loxophleba and Acacia acuminata open low woodlands, 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

ix

sometimes with an understory of mixed Chenopods on the floodplains and Eucalyptus camaldulensis 



and Casuarina obesa on the creeklines and river banks. 

The  dominant  vegetation  communities  of  the  Yalgoo  region  were  characterised  by;  mixed  Acacia 



ramulosa var. linophyllaAcacia quadrimarginea and Acacia grasbyi tall shrublands on the low rocky 

hill  slopes;  Acacia  ramulosa  var.  linophylla  and  Acacia  ramulosa  var.  ramulosa  tall  shrublands  or 

mixed Eucalyptus spp. low woodlands on the red sand plains; Acacia burkittiiAcacia grasbyiAcacia 

ramulosa  var.  linophylla  and  Acacia  eremaea  open  tall  shrublands,  sometimes  over  sparse  low 

Chenopod  shrublands  on  the  floodplains;  Casuarina  obesa  open  low  forests,  over  open  Chenopod 

spp.  low  shrublands  on  the  major  creeklines  and  Acacia  burkittii  and  Acacia  tetragonophylla  mid 

woodlands on the minor creeklines and drainage channels. 

The dominant vegetation communities of the Murchison region were characterised by; mixed Acacia 

aneura  and  Acacia  ramulosa  var.  linophylla  open  low  woodlands  on  rocky  hill  slopes  of  the  Weld 

Range  and  Jack  Hills  and  other  rocky  areas  in  the  region;  Acacia  aneura  and  Acacia  ramulosa  var. 



linophylla  open  low  woodlands,  over  mixed  Eremophila  spp.  open  mid  shrublands  on  the  red  sand 

plains; Isolated Acacia aneura low trees, over mixed Eremophila spp. and Senna spp. mid shrublands, 

over Ptilotus obovatus sparse low shrublands on the red hardpan or stony plains; mixed Chenopod 

low  shrublands  surrounding  salt  lakes  and  on  floodplains;  Eucalyptus  victrix,  Casuarina  obesa  and 



Acacia burkittii open mid woodlands on major creeklines and Acacia aneuraAcacia tetragonophylla 

and Acacia kempeana mixed low woodlands on minor creeklines and drainage channels. 

The  72  vegetation  communties  are  described  in  full  in  Appendix  H  and  have  been  mapped  in 

Appendix I. 



VEGETATION CONSERVATION ASSESSMENT OF THE STUDY AREA 

Database searches indicate that no Threatened Ecological Communities of national significance occur 

within a 2 km buffer of the Study Area.  However, four Priority 1, Priority Ecological Communities of 

state significance do, these include: 

1.

 

Jack  Hills  vegetation  complexes  (Banded  Ironstone  Formation);  associated  with  vegetation 



communities; Mh1, Mh2, Mh3, Mh4 and Mc3.  These communities are restricted to Jack Hills 

and are significant; 

2.

 

Plant  assemblages  of  the  Moresby  Range  system;  associated  with  vegetation  communities; 



Gh1,  Gh2  and  Gh3.    These  communities  are  restricted  to  the  Moresby  Range  and  are 

significant; 

3.

 

Tallering  Peak  vegetation  complexes;  associated  with  vegetation  communities  Yh1  and  Yp2.  



Yh1  is  restricted  to  the  Tallering  land  system  and  is  significant,  whereas  Yp2  is  more 

widespread in the local area and is not significant; and 

4.

 

Weld Range vegetation complexes (Banded Ironstone Formation); associated with vegetation 



communities; Mh5, Mh6, Mh7, Mh8, Mc3 and Mc4.  These communities were restricted to the 

Weld Range and are significant.  

The  local  conservation  assessment  of  the  vegetation  communities  recorded  in  the  Study  Area  has 

been assessed using a number of factors discussed in full in section 0.  The vegetation communities 

have been assigned a conservation significance rating of; very high, high, moderate or low as listed 

below: 


Very high 

Gh1, Gh2, Gh3, Gy1, Gy2, Mh6, Mf2. 



High 

Gp2, Gc1, Gc2, Yh1, Yf4, Mh1, Mh2, Mh3, Mh4, Mh7, Mh8, Mh13, Mh18, Mf1, Mf3, 

Mc3. 

Moderate  

Gf1, Gf2, Yp3, Mh10, Mh11, Mh12, Mr1, Mr2, Mp6, Mp7, Mp10, Mc2. 



 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

x

Low  

Gp1, Yh2, Yh3, Yy1, Yp1, Yp2, Yp4, Yp5, Yp6, Yf1, Yf2, Yf3, Yf5, Yc1, Yc2, Mh9, Mh14, 

Mh15, Mh16, Mh17, Mr3, Mp1, Mp2, Mp3, Mp4, Mp5, Mp8, Mp11, Mc1, Mc5, Mc6, 

Mc7, Mc8. 

These are discussed in full in section 7.3.3. 



FLORA 

A  total  of  1016  taxa  were  recorded  in  the  Study  Area.    This  number  includes  84  families  and  322 

genera, of which 220 taxa (21.7%) were annuals, one was a endangered DRF, 57 were Priority Flora 

(including one vulnerable Priority 4), 62 were general weeds and three were Declared Plants. 

A species accumulation curve was used to statistically estimate sampling adequacy using the quadrat 

based data.  This showed that 77% of flora taxa in the Freehold land area and 81% of flora taxa in the 

Pastoral  land  area  were  recorded.    After  adding  the  opportunistic  collections  from  the  transect 

survey  to  this  estimation,  it  showed  that  110%  of  flora  taxa  in  the  Freehold  land  area  and  98%  of 

flora taxa in the Pastoral land area were recorded in the Study Area, indicating that the majority of 

plant species have been recorded during the current survey. 



FLORA CONSERVATION ASSESSMENT 

Two  species  of  national  significance,  listed  under  the  Environment  Protection  and  Biodiversity 



Conservation  Act  1999  (EPBC  Act)  were  recorded  in  the  Study  Area;  Caladenia  hoffmanii 

(Endangered) and Eucalyptus blaxellii (Vulnerable).  An additional two species of national significance 

were  recorded  in  the  Study  Area  from  the  DEC  database  searches;  Drummondita  ericoides 

(Endangered)  and  Philotheca  wonganensis  (Endangered).    These  taxa  are  also  of  state  significance 

and are listed under the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (WC Act) as DRF except Eucalyptus blaxellii 

which is a Priority 4 taxon. 

Of  these  taxa,  it  is  considered  that  Caladenia  hoffmanii,  Drummondita  ericoides  and  Philotheca 

wonganensis  have  high  local  significance  and  Eucalyptus  blaxellii  has  low  local  significance  in  the 

Study Area (Section 8.1). 

Fifty‐seven  Priority  Flora  taxa  of  regional  significance  were  recorded  in  the  Study  Area  during  the 

current survey, including; 

 

Priority 1: Acacia lineolata subsp. multilineata, Chamelaucium sp. Yalgoo (Y. Chadwick 1816), 



Euphorbia  sarcostemmoides,  Gunniopsis  divisa,  Lepidosperma  sp.  Moresby  Range  (R.J. 

Cranfield  2751),  Melaleuca  huttensis,  Mirbelia  ternata,  Petrophile  vana,  Sauropus  sp. 

Woolgorong  (M.  Officer  s.n.  10/8/94),  Scholtzia  ?sp.  Binnu  (M.E.  Trudgen  2218)  and 

Thryptomene sp. Wandana (M.E. Trudgen MET 22016). 

 



Priority 2: Frankenia confusa, Homalocalyx inerrabundus, Leucopogon borealis, Leucopogon sp. 

Howatharra (D. & N. McFarland 1046), Scholtzia sp. East Yuna (A.C. Burns 6), Thryptomene sp. 

East Yuna (J.W. Green (4639) and Thryptomene stenophylla. 

 



Priority  3:  Acacia  leptospermoides  subsp.  psammophila,  Acacia  speckii,  Acacia  subsessilis, 

Acanthocarpus  parviflorus,  Blackallia  nudiflora,  Calytrix  erosipetala,  Calytrix  formosa,  Calytrix 

uncinata,  Calytrix  verruculosa,  Dicrastylis  linearifolia,  Dodonaea  amplisemina,  Eremophila 

arachnoides  subsp.  arachnoides,  Eremophila  muelleriana,  Geleznowia  verrucosa  subsp. 

Kalbarri  (L.M.  Broadhurst  123),  Grevillea  stenostachya,  Grevillea  triloba,  Hemigenia  tysonii, 



Hemigenia  virescens,  Homalocalyx  echinulatus,  Indigofera  gilesii  subsp.  gilesii,  Microcorys 

tenuifolia,  Petrophile  pauciflora,  Prostanthera  petrophila,  Ptilotus  beardii,  Ptilotus  luteolus, 

Serichonus  gracilipes,  Thryptomene  sp.  Moresby  Range  (A.S.  George  14873),  Verticordia 

chrysostachys var. pallida, Verticordia densiflora var. roseostella and Verticordia jamiesonii. 

 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

xi



 

Priority  4:  Acacia  guinetii,  Baeckea  sp.  Melita  Station  (H.  Pringle  2738),  Diuris  recurva, 



Eucalyptus  blaxellii,  Goodenia  berringbinensis,  Grevillea  inconspicua,  Jacksonia  velutina, 

Verticordia capillaris and Verticordia penicillaris. 

An additional 31 Priority Flora taxa of regional significance were recorded in the Study Area by the 

DECs database searches and from other surveys carried out in the region, including; 

 



Priority 1:  Acacia sp. Jack Hills (R. Meissner & Y. Caruso 4), Baeckea staminosa, Eremophila sp. 

Tallering (J.D. Start & M.J. Greeve D 516), Goodenia lyrata, Harperia ferruginipes, Lepidobolus 



basiflorus,  Leucopogon  psammophilus,  Ptilotus  tetrandrus,  Scholtzia  sp.  Valentine  Road 

(S. Patrick 2142), Tricoryne sp. Geraldton (G.J. Keighery 10461) and Vittadinia cervicularis var. 



occidentalis. 

 



Priority  2:  Acacia  megacephala,  Dicrastylis  incana,  Malleostemon  sp.  Moonyoonooka  (R.J. 

Cranfield 2947), Thryptomene sp. Yuna Reserve (A.C. Burns 100) and Verticordia aereiflora. 

 

Priority 3:  Arnocrinum drummondii, Baeckea sp. Walkaway (A.S. George 11249), Gastrolobium 



propinquum,  Gastrolobium  rotundifolium,  Gnephosis  cassiniana,  Grevillea  candicans, 

Lasiopetalum  oppositifolium,  Lepidium  scandens,  Micromyrtus  placoides,  Scaevola  oldfieldii, 

Stenanthemum divaricatum and Tecticornia cymbiformis 

 



Priority  4:    Eucalyptus  ebbanoensis  subsp.  photina,  Lechenaultia  longiloba  and

 

Verticordia 

polytricha. 

Of  the  Priority  Flora  taxa  recorded  in  the  Study  Area,  it  is  considered  that  five  have  high  local 

significance, including; Lepidosperma sp. Moresby Range (Priority 1), Leucopogon borealis (Priority 2), 

Leucopogon  sp.  Howatharra  (Priority  2),  Serichonus  gracilipes  (Priority  3)  and  Thryptomene  sp. 

Moresby Range (Priority 3).   

The  conservation  significance  of  the  Priority  Flora  taxa  recorded  in  the  Study  Area  is  discussed 

further in section 8.1. 

 

 

 



 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

1

1



 

INTRODUCTION 

Oakajee  Port  and  Rail  Pty  Ltd  (OPR)  propose  the  Oakajee  Rail  Development  (the  Proposal),  a 

component of the larger Oakajee Port and Rail Development which also consists of the Oakajee Port 

(Approved  Port)  and  the  Oakajee  Port  Terrestrial  Development,  which  is  the  subject  of  a  separate 

environmental impact assessment. 

The Study Area comprises the development of approximately 570 km of rail formation within a rail 

transport  corridor  from  mines  in  the  northern  mid‐west  to  an  export  port  at  Oakajee  located 

approximately 24 km north of Geraldton.  The mainline (of approximately 530 km) extends from the 

western boundary of Reserve 16200 near the North West Coastal Highway to Jack Hills mine in the 

north‐east.    In  addition,  the  Study  Area  includes  a  21  km  spur  to  connect  to  the  existing  WestNet 

(Mullewa) and a 10‐15 km spur to Weld Range.  The Mullewa spur will potentially connect mine to 

the south of Mullewa to the Oakajee Port (Figure 1.1).  The Study Area is 4 km in width through the 

Pastoral  land  area  and  3.2  km  in  width  through  the  Freehold  land  area.  One  10  km  section  in  the 

Freehold land area was approximately 6.8 km in width. 


1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   74


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə