Oakajee port and rail opr rail development vegetation and flora assessment



Yüklə 8.07 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə6/74
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü8.07 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   74

Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

27

In 2005, the DEC surveyed Banded Ironstone Formations (BIF) of the Yilgarn Craton, including areas in 



the Murchison and Yalgoo bioregions: 

 



Flora and vegetation  communities were surveyed in the  central Tallering Land System of  the 

Yalgoo bioregion (south of Yalgoo) (Markey & Dillon, 2008a).  One hundred and three quadrats 

were  established  during  the  survey  and  one  DRF  taxon  and  13  Priority  Flora  taxa  were 

recorded (Table B.1, Appendix B). 

 

Markey  &  Dillon  (2008b)  surveyed  the  flora  and  vegetation  at  Weld  Range  (Murchison 



bioregion).    Fifty‐two  quadrats  were  established  during  the  survey  and  six  main  vegetation 

communities  (and  four  sub‐communities)  were  described.    Eight  Priority  Flora  taxa  were 

recorded (Table B.1, Appendix B). 

 



The flora and vegetation of the Jack Hills (Murchison bioregion) were surveyed by Meissner & 

Caruso  (2008).    Fifty  quadrats  were  established  during  the  survey  and  six  vegetation 

communities were described.  Four Priority Flora taxa were recorded (Table B.1, Appendix B). 

ecologia  (2009a,  in  preparation)  conducted  an  extensive  three  phase  vegetation  and  flora 

assessment at Weld Range; surveys were completed in 2006, 2007 and 2008.  A total of 239 quadrats 

were  established  during  the  surveys  and  seven  vegetation  communities  (and  16  sub‐communities) 

were described and mapped.  Twenty‐four Priority Flora species were recorded (Table B.1, Appendix 

B).  

During 2004/2005, Mattiske (2005) conducted a flora and vegetation assessment at Jack Hills.  One 



hundred  and  twenty‐two  quadrats  were  established  during  the  survey  and  18  vegetation 

communities  were  described  and  mapped.    Four  Priority  Flora  taxa  were  recorded  (Table  B.1, 

Appendix B). 

ecologia (2009b, Draft) also conducted a two phase vegetation and flora assessment at Jack Hills in 

2006/2007.    One‐hundred  and  ninety‐five  quadrats  were  established  during  the  survey  and  six 

vegetation  communities  (and  18  sub‐communities)  were  described.    Seven  Priority  Flora  taxa  were 

recorded (Table B.1, Appendix B). 

A  baseline  vegetation  survey  was  conducted  near  Mount  Magnet  in  1994  by  Landcare  Services 

(1995).  Quadrats were assessed at eight sites in native vegetation and one rehabilitated waste dump 

site.  The dominant vegetation of the area was Acacia aneura woodlands with a mixed understorey 

of chenopods and Eremophila species.  Of the 206 endemic taxa recorded during the survey, three 

were  Priority  Flora:  Alyxia  tetanifolia  (Priority  3),  Calytrix  erosipetala  (Priority  3)  and  Grevillea 

inconspicua (Priority 4).   

Alan Tingay & Associates (1998) completed an environmental appraisal and management plan for a 

proposed railway from Tallering Peak to Oakajee.  They reported on findings from several vegetation 

and flora surveys conducted along the route.  Eleven vegetation associations were described and 321 

flora  taxa  were  recorded.    Twelve  Priority  Flora  taxa  were  recorded  along  the  route:  Scholtzia  sp. 

Gunyidi  (J.D.  Briggs  1721) (Priority  2),  Scholtzia  sp.  Murchison  River  (A.S.  George  7098)  (Priority  2), 



Thryptomene  sp.  East  Yuna  (J.W.  Green  4639)  (Priority  2),  Thryptomene  stenophylla  (Priority  2), 

Thryptomene  sp.  Yuna  Reserve  (AC  Burns  100)  (Priority  2),  Acacia  leptospermoides  subsp. 

psammophila  (Priority  3),  Baeckea  sp.  Walkaway  (A.S.  George  11249)  (Priority  3),  Geleznowia 

verrucosa  (Priority  3),  Grevillea  candicans  (Priority  3),  Microcorys  tenuifolia  (Priority  3),  Persoonia 

pentasticha (Priority 3), and Verticordia capillaris (Priority 4). 

In 1998, Landcare Services Pty Ltd (1998) conducted a flora and fauna survey from Oakajee to south 

of Geraldton.  Ten vegetation types were described and a total of 117 flora taxa were recorded.  Two 

Priority Flora species were recorded: Grevillea erinacea (Priority 3) and Stenanthemum divaricatum 

(Priority 3). 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

28

Dames & Moore (1993) conducted a flora and fauna assessment at Oakajee in 1993.  Six vegetation 



types  associated  with  six  distinct  terrain  types  were  described  and  mapped  at  a  scale  of  1:25,000.  

Heaths and shrublands dominated the vegetation, with some minor woodland in river valleys.  One 

hundred  and  sixty‐five  flora  taxa  were  recorded  during  the  survey,  including  one  Priority  Flora 

species ‐ Grevillea triloba (Priority 3). 

In  August  1997  Muir  Environmental  (1977)  conducted  a  follow‐up  survey  of  the  area  surveyed  by 

Dames  and  Moore  (1993),  as  it  was  extended  to  include  a  buffer  zone  and  quarry  sites.    The 

vegetation  of  the  six  terrain  types  identified  by  Dames  and  Moore  (1993)  was  re‐assessed.    Two‐

hundred  and  seventeen  taxa  were  recorded  (52  more  than  in  1993).    One  confirmed  DRF  and  two 

Priority  Flora  taxa  were  recorded  during  this  survey:  Eucalyptus  blaxellii  (Vulnerable,  Priority  4), 

Grevillea  triloba  (Priority  3),  and  Verticordia  penicillaris  (Priority  4).    The  collection  of  a  hybrid 

specimen  (a  cross  between  Caladenia  hoffmanii  (DRF)  and  Caladenia  longicauda)  indicates  that 



Caladenia hoffmanii may have been present in the area. 

ecologia  (2009c  in  preparation)  completed  a  single  phase  vegetation  and  flora  survey  (in  2006) 

followed  by  a  threatened  flora  survey  (in  2009)  at  Oakajee.    Twenty‐one  quadrats  were  assessed 

during  the  vegetation  and  flora  survey,  and  14  vegetation  units  were  described  and  mapped  at  a 

scale  of  1:40,000.    One  DRF  and  10  Priority  Flora  were  recorded  during  the  surveys  (Table  B.1, 

Appendix B). 

A  biological  survey  of  the  Buller  River  area  was  conducted  by  ecologia  (2009d,  in  preparation)  in 

2009.    Five  vegetation  units  at  the  sub  association  level  were  described  and  mapped.    Sixty‐three 

flora taxa were recorded, and none of these were DRF or Priority Flora. 

An ecological survey was conducted by GHD (2009) for a proposed haul road between Jack Hills and 

Weld  Range.    Twenty‐five  quadrats  were  assessed  during  the  vegetation  and  flora  survey,  and  18 

vegetation  units  were  described  and  mapped.    Eight  Priority  Flora  taxa  were  recorded  during  this 

survey (Table B.1, Appendix B). 



2.8.1

 

Vegetation Described by Beard 

The  Study  Area  lies  predominantly  in  Beard’s  (1976)  Murchison  region  of  the  Eremaean  Botanical 

Province.    The  Murchison  region  is  well  known  for  the  dominance  of  mulga  (Acacia  aneura

woodlands, and the extensive flats and plains provide optimum conditions for these woodlands.  On 

the  more  favourable  soils  (plains  and  valleys)  Acacia  aneura  generally  grows  in  the  form  of  a  tree 

with a single erect trunk and forms low woodlands.  On less favourable soils (hill slopes and ridges) it 

takes the form of a shrub producing shrublands/scrublands (Beard, 1976). 

Most  of  the  Study  Area  lies  in  the  Upper  Murchison  subregion  in  the  Murchison  region  of  the 

Eremaean Botanical Province (Beard, 1976).  The vegetation of this area is described as: 

 



Plains  covered  by  continuous  or  interrupted  Acacia  aneura  (mulga)  low  woodlands.    Tree 

deterioration and death is common in this area, and there is very little regeneration of the A. 



aneura.  This has resulted in large areas where only Senna and Eremophila species are present 

or other Acacia species such as A. victoriae and A. tetragonophylla.  

 

Granite  and  gneiss  hills  are  generally  covered  with  Acacia  aneura  (shrub  form),  and  A. 



quadrimarginea  and  A.  ramulosa  var.  ramulosa  or  A.  ramulosa  var.  linophylla.    Understorey 

species include Eremophila spathulata and Ptilotus obovatus.  The main species at Jack Hills is 



A.  grasbyi  (often  a  tree  form)  with  Eremophila  fraseri.    Acacia  aneura,  A.  ramulosa  var. 

ramulosa  and  Acacia  tetragonophylla  also  occur.    At  Weld  Range  banded  ironstone  ridges 

support  two  main  species  –  Acacia  aneura  and  Acacia  quadrimarginea  –  additional  species 

include Eremophila latrobeiScaevola spinescens and Ptilotus obovatus.  The lower slopes are 

covered with Acacia aneura and A. ramulosa var. linophylla



 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

29



 

Sandplain  patches  consist  of  Acacia  ramulosa  var.  linophylla  scrub,  with  A.  aneura  less 

commonly.  While Eremophila leucophyllaSolanum lasiophyllum and Maireana convexa occur 

as understorey shrubs.  

 

Extensive  salt  flats,  along  the  upper  courses  of  the  Murchison,  are  covered  with  Atriplex 



vesicaria and Frankenia pauciflora, often with scattered Acacia sclerosperma and A. victoriae.  

Downstream  of  the  Murchison,  the  main  vegetation  is  Acacia  species  scrub  (A.  victoriae,  A. 



sclerosperma and A. tetragonophylla) with scattered Eucalyptus camaldulensis.   

A  section  of  the  Study  Area  is  situated  in  the  Yalgoo  subregion  in  the  Murchison  region  of  the 

Eremaean  Botanical  Province  (Beard,  1976).    The  vegetation  associated  with  this  transitional  area, 

between the Eremaean Botanical Province and the South‐western Botanical Province, is described as: 

 

Still  Eremaean  in  character,  but  with  the  increase  in  rainfall  and  the  shift  of  climate  from 



desert  (arid)  to  Mediterranean,  Acacia  aneura  decreases  and  is  replaced  by  other  Acacia 

species.  The vegetation also becomes lower and denser in a south‐westerly direction.   

 

The plains of the inland portion of this subregion support mixed Acacia species scrub mainly of 



A. ramulosa var. ramulosaA. grasbyiA. acuminata and A. tetragonophylla, with scattered A. 

aneura.    The  stony  hills  are  dominated  by  Acacia  ramulosa  var.  ramulosa  and  A.  acuminata 

scrub,  with  A.  quadrimarginea  and  A.  stereophylla.    The  sandplains  have  a  rich  flora  and  are 

dominated  by  Acacia  ramulosa  var.  ramulosa  and  A.  murrayana.    Low‐lying  plains  support 

Acacia sclerosperma and A. eremaea scrub, with Atriplex and Maireana species.  

 



The  south‐western  portion  of  the  subregion  includes  thickets  of  Acacia  ramulosa  var. 

ramulosaA. acuminata and Melaleuca uncinata occurring in midslope positions, while Acacia 

ramulosa  var.  ramulosa  scrub  with  scattered  Callitris  and  Eucalyptus  species  occur  in  the 

valleys.  

A  small  section  of  the  Study  Area  incorporates  the  Talisker  vegetation  system  of  the  Eremaean 

Botanical Province.  The vegetation of this system is described by Beard & Burns (1976) as: 

 

Sandplain  associated  with  Acacia  ramulosa  var.  ramulosa/Acacia  ramulosa  var.  linophylla 



scrub with scattered Eucalyptus species and Callitris columellaris.  Understorey species include 

Baeckea pentagonanthaEremophila clarkei and Grevillea stenostachya.  

The  remaining  section  lies  in  the  Greenough  region  of  the  South‐western  Botanical  Province, 

incorporating the Yuna, Kalbarri, Northampton, Greenough and Mullewa vegetation systems (Beard, 

1976; Beard & Burns, 1976).  The vegetation of these systems is described as: 

 

Yuna  System:  the  yellow  sandplains  support  scrub  heath  associations;  Acacia‐Casuarina 



species thickets occur on red sandplains; while scrub with mallee and scattered trees occur in 

red  soil  depressions.    Eucalyptus  loxophleba  and  E.  loxophleba‐E.  salmonophloia  woodlands 

occur in bottomland soils west of Mullewa.  The Greenough River valley is generally covered 

with  Acacia  acuminata  scrub  and  scattered  Eucalyptus  loxophleba.    Salt  flat  vegetation  is 

primarily Tecticornia species and other samphires, with some Atriplex vesicaria and Melaleuca 

thyoides.  

 



Kalbarri  System:  the  hills  support  Acacia‐Melaleuca  species  thickets  with  Acacia  ligulata

Melaleuca  eleuterostachya  and  M.  uncinata.    Sandplains  support  a  rich  scrub  heath  which 

covers  most  of  the  area  ‐  Acacia  rostellifera  occurs  near  the  coast,  Adenanthos  cygnorum



Banksia attenuata and B. menziesii inhabit white sands, while Actinostrobus species, Banksia 

prionotesB. sceptrum and Xylomelum species occur in yellow sands.  Small patches of mallees 

include Eucalyptus loxophlebaE. eudesmioides and E. dongarraensis.  

 

Northampton System: scrub heath associations occur on mesa tops (laterite and sand); laterite 



species  include  Gastrolobium  oxylobioides,  Casuarina  campestris,  Xanthorrhoea  preissii

 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

30

Dryandra spp., Calothamnus spp., Hakea spp. and Melaleuca spp.; while the sand community 

grows  taller  and  more  open  with  Acacia  rostellifera,  Banksia,  Dryandra,  Casuarina  and 

Gastrolobium  species.    Melaleuca‐Hakea  spp.  thickets  occur  on  the  Jurassic  sediments 

(generally  forming  steep  scarp  slopes)  and  the  two  dominant  communities  are  Melaleuca 



megacephala  and  Hakea  pycnoneura  and  Casuarina  campestris  and  M.  uncinata.    Acacia 

acuminata scrub with Hakea species and scattered Eucalyptus loxophleba occur on the lower 

undulating terrain on granites and granulites, while Allocasuarina campestris thickets occur on 

gravelly soils and scattered Eucalyptus camaldulensis along drainage lines.   

 



Greenough  System:  the  rocky  ridges  support  Acacia  rostellifera  and  Melaleuca  cardiophylla 

thickets.    Acacia‐Banksia  species  scrub  (dominated  by  Acacia  rostellifera  and  Banksia 



prionotes)  occurs  on  sand‐covered  limestone.    Acacia  rostellifera  low  forests  occur  on  the 

alluvial  flats,  recent  dunes  commonly  support  Acacia  ligulata  open  scrub,  while  Eucalyptus 



camaldulensis and Casuarina obesa occur along creeklines. 

 



Mullewa  System:  the  sandplains  support  Acacia‐Casuarina‐Melaleuca  thickets,  whilst  the 

vegetation  of  the  dissected  terrain  is  Acacia  acuminata  scrub  with  scattered  Eucalyptus 



loxophleba and Casuarina huegeliana.  Associated species include Acacia tetragonophylla and 

Hakea  preissii,  with  Senna  and  Eremophila  species  forming  the  lower  shrub  layer  and 

ephemerals comprising the ground layer. 

The vegetation of the Study Area was mapped as 28 communities by Beard (1976) and Beard & Burns 

(1976).  These 28 units are described in Table 2.8 and shown in Figure 2.12 to Figure 2.16. 

 


 

 

 



Oakajee Port and Rail 

OPR Rail Development – Vegetation and Flora Assessment 

 

May 2010 



 

 

 



 

31

Table 2.8 





 Beard Vegetation Communities of the Study Area 

Beard Code 

Map 

Unit 

Vegetation Community 

a1,14Si 


 

Acacia aneura and Acacia quadrimarginea scrub. 

a1,8Sr k1,2Ci 



 

Acacia aneura and Acacia sclerosperma with Atriplex and Maireana spp. succulent 

steppe. 


a1,9Li 

 

Acacia aneura, Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa and Acacia ramulosa var. linophylla low 

woodland. 

a10,11Si k1,2Ci 



 

Acacia victoriae, Acacia xiphophylla and Acacia eremaea with Atriplex and Maireana 

spp. succulent steppe. 

a14Si 

 

Acacia quadrimarginea scrub. 



a1Li 

 

Acacia aneura low woodland. 

a1Li a9,17Si 

 

Acacia aneura low woodland with understorey of Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa

Acacia ramulosa var. linophylla and Acacia grasbyi

a1Lp 


 

Acacia aneura, trees in groves or patches. 

a1Si 


 

Acacia aneura scrub. 

a33Sc 


 

Acacia rostellifera thicket. 

a8,9Sr k1,2Ci 



 

Acacia sclerospermaAcacia ramulosa var. ramulosa and Acacia ramulosa var. 

linophylla with Atriplex and Maireana spp. succulent steppe. 

a8Sr k1,2Ci 



 

Acacia sclerosperma with Atriplex and Maireana spp. succulent steppe.  

a9,19Si 


 

Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosaAcacia ramulosa var. linophylla and Acacia acuminata 

scrub. 


a9,20Si 

 

Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosaAcacia ramulosa var. linophylla and Acacia murrayana 

scrub. 


a9Si 

 

Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa and Acacia ramulosa var. linophylla scrub. 

acSc 


 

Acacia ‐ Casuarina spp. thicket. 

anSi 


 

Mixed Acacia spp. scrub. 

ceLr a9Si 

 

Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosa and Acacia ramulosa var. linophylla scrub with Callitris 

columellaris and Eucalyptus spp. 

e6c5Mr a9,19Si 



 

Acacia ramulosa var. ramulosaAcacia ramulosa var. linophylla and Acacia acuminata 

scrub with scattered Eucalyptus loxophleba and Casuarina huegeliana

e6,8Mi 

 

Eucalyptus loxophleba and Eucalyptus salmonophloia sclerophyll woodland. 

e6Mr a19Si 



 

Acacia acuminata scrub with scattered Eucalyptus loxophleba

e6Mr eaSi 



 

Eucalyptus spp. (mallee) and Acacia spp. scrub with scattered Eucalyptus loxophleba

k1,3Ci 


 

Atriplex spp., Tecticornia spp. and other samphires succulent steppe. 

k3Ci 


 

Tecticornia spp. and other samphires succulent steppe. 

mhSc 


 

Melaleuca ‐ Hakea spp. thicket. 

x2SZc 


 

Scrub heath coastal association. 

x3SZc 

 

Scrub heath inland association. 



x3SZc/acSc 

 

Acacia ‐ Casuarina spp. thicket with scrub heath inland association. 

Note:  

‘Beard Code’ column refers to vegetation types mapped by Beard (1976) and Beard & Burns (1976).  



 

3

2

1



4

200000


300000

400000


500000

600000


6700

000


6800

000


6900

000


7000

000


7100

000


7200

000


K

0

30



60

Kilometres



1:1,500,000

Absolute Scale -

Legend

Proposed Rail Alignment

Proposed Project Area

Coordinate System

Name: GDA 1994 MGA Zone 50

Projection: Transverse Mercator

Datum: GDA 1994



Figure:

 2.12

Project ID: 1131

Drawn: AH

Date: 10/07/09

Beard Vegetation of the

Study Area

(Overview)

A3

Unique Map ID: A014



x2SZc

anSi


e6Mr a19Si

x3SZc


k3Ci

e6Mr eaSi

mhSc

e6c5Mr a9,19Si



acSc

x3SZc/acSc

acmSc

x4SZc


ceLr a9Si

abSi


a9,19m6Sc

e6Mr a19Si/c3Sc

a9,20Si

e6,8Mi


a33Sc

a9,19Si


k1,3Ci

a14Si


e6Mr a9,19Si

e6,22Mr eaSi

mSi k3Ci

a21Sr


ds

a8Sr k1,2Ci

e6Mi

a23Lc


275000

300000


325000

350000


375000

6825


000

6850


000

6875


000
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   74


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə