On the discovery of a new endemic Cynanchum (Apocynaceae) on Gunner’s Quoin, Mauritius



Yüklə 64.26 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü64.26 Kb.

7

On the discovery of a new endemic Cynanchum (Apocynaceae) on 

Gunner’s Quoin, Mauritius

F.B. V


INCENT

 F

LORENS



1

 & C


LAUDIA

 B

AIDER



2

Department of Biosciences, University of Mauritius, Réduit, M



AURITIUS

[v.fl orens@uom.ac.mu]

Mauritius Herbarium, Mauritius Sugar Industry Research Institute, Réduit, M



AURITIUS

Abstract -

Cynanchum scopulosum Bosser (Apocynaceae), a new Mauritius endemic species was discovered 

in 2003 on Gunner’s Quoin Nature Reserve, a highly degraded offshore islet north of Mauritius. 

The plant’s basic ecology is described and threats to its persistence are discussed. The species 

is Critically Endangered. Recommendations to secure its future are given. The discovery adds 

further conservation value to Gunner’s Quoin.

Key words -

Cynanchum scopulosum, islet restoration, invasive species, IUCN conservation status.

I

NTRODUCTION



The fl ora of Mauritius started to be documented during the late 18

th

 century, 



and within two centuries most of its species had been described (B

OSSER


et al. 1976-

onwards). However, despite having only about 5% of its original native vegetation left, 

new records of native plant species continue to be made. Recent examples include a 

new endemic Myrtaceae, Syzygium guehoi Bosser & Florens (B

OSSER

 & 


B

OSSER


B

OSSER


F

LORENS


 2000), 

discovered  in  1989,  or  the  orchid  Taeniophyllum  coxii  (Summerh.)  Summerh.,  an 

aphylous epiphyte of wide distribution fi rst recorded in Mauritius in 2000 (R

OBERTS


et 

al. 2004). Here we report on the latest such discovery, made in 2003, of a Cynanchum

species (Apocynaceae) endemic to Gunner’s Quoin islet, north of Mauritius.

The  Apocynaceae  is  a  large  mainly  tropical  family  of  some  415  genera 

and  4,555  species  (S

TEVENS

  2001-onwards)  of  which  some  200  belong  to  the  genus 



Cynanchum

1

 (M



ABBERLEY

 1997). In Mauritius, the Asclepiadoideae is represented by 

six native genera and 11 native species (B

OSSER


 & M

ARAIS


 2005). 

The fi rst mention of Cynanchum in Mauritius, of which the species cannot 

be  ascertained,  was  made  by

 

B



OJER

  (1837)  under 

B

OJER


B

OJER


Sarcostemma  mauritianum.  It 

was  recorded  on  high  mountains  on  Mauritius,  a  habitat  type  today  occupied  by  C. 



glomeratum. Later, B

AKER


 (1877) mentioned a second species, 

B

AKER



B

AKER


Decanema bojerianum

Decne (=C. luteifl uens (Jum. & H. Perrier) Desc.)), which appears to be the same as 

Bojer’s taxon (B

OSSER


 & M

ARAIS


 2005).

 

Later references to Cynanchum in Mauritius are 



under Sarcostemma viminale (ex. V

AUGHAN


 1937, G

UÉHO


 1988). It is now established 

however that Rodrigues has one and Mauritius three endemic species of Cynanchum

(B

OSSER


 & M

ARAIS


 2005). No native Cynanchum is known from Reunion island.

1

In the Flore de Mascareignes



Flore de Mascareignes Cynanchum is treated under Asclepiadaceae

Phelsuma 14; 7-12

8

M

ETHODS



Study site

 

Gunner’s  Quoin,  a  76ha  offshore  volcanic  islet  4



 

km  north  of  Mauritius, 

consists of rock laid down 0.7-0.025M years ago (M

ONTAGGIONI

 & N

ATTIVEL


 1988) and 

culminates at 162m a.m.s.l. Most of the islet consists of friable volcanic tuft while the 

eastern side has an overlying basalt layer. Inferring from C

AMOIN


et al. (2004), the islet 

would have been cut off from mainland Mauritius by rising sea level some 10,000 years 

ago. V

AUGHAN


 and W

IEHE


 (1937) believed that the islet supported a palm savannah in its 

pristine condition before being much altered by human activity since the 18

th

 century. 



The most recent published botanical surveys previous to our visit revealed an ecosystem 

largely overrun by alien plants which made up 48 of the 72 higher plant species (D

ULLOO

1994). Despite its advanced degradation state, where large parts of the islet are dominated 



by invasive plants, Gunner’s Quoin still harbours some valuable native relicts like the 

largest population of  the Mauritius endemic Lomatophyllum tormentorii. The native 

vertebrate fauna includes mainly tropic birds (Phaeton rubricauda

vertebrate fauna includes mainly tropic birds (

vertebrate fauna includes mainly tropic birds (

 and P. lepturus

 and

 and


) and 

Wedge-tailed shearwater (Puffi nus pacifi cus

((

) as well as four species of reptiles. The 



eradication of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus

eradication of Norway rats (

eradication of Norway rats (

), black-naped hare (Lepus nigricollis

), black-naped hare (

), black-naped hare (

and domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus sp.) in the 1990’s (B



ELL

 2002), greatly enhanced the 

conservation value of the islet particularly as a site for eventual reintroduction of reptiles 

from Round Island.



Surveys

 

The authors found the new Cynanchum species during a four-days biodiversity 



survey  of  the  islet  in  December  2003  under  a  Government  of  Mauritius  project 

commissioned for the creation of the Islets National Park. The survey was carried out 

in all different areas safe the inaccessible western cliffs which were examined where 

possible with binoculars. Ecological notes, like level of threats posed to the habitat by 

alien species, were taken to allow for an assessment of the threat category of the species 

using IUCN Criteria (IUCN 2001). Samples were deposited at the Mauritius Herbarium 

and  duplicates  sent  to  the  Herbarium  of  the  Museum  National  d’Histoire  Naturelle, 

Paris.


R

ESULTS


 

We  found  77  higher  plant  species  including  the  new  Cynanchum  of  which 

a colony of an estimated two dozens intermingled individuals was found. A sample 

was  deposited  at  the  Mauritius  Herbarium  (Holotype  MAU  23772).  Other  vouchers 

collected on a second visit in 2004 are: MAU 24070, 24071, 24072, 24073 and 24074.

C. scopulosum was growing from the upper scarp downwards on a near vertical 

sea facing cliff and its ledges in the south west of the islet between 20-50 m amsl (Fig. 1). 

The species is a rather procumbent liana with branches reaching one cm in diameter. It 

has markedly constricted nodes and a silvery green tinge that distinguishes it vegetatively 

from all other Mauritian Cynanchum. Its branching stems reach several metres long and 

creeps over exposed rocks and low cliff vegetation. Towards their extremities, the stems 

are usually erect sometimes reaching one meter high. The colony spans a maximum 


9

of about 40 m laterally and 30 m vertically and varies from dense monospecifi c areas 

towards its core to more diffused growth towards the edges where it grows together 

with  several  other  native  species  including  Tylophora  coriacea  (Apocynaceae), 



Lomatophyllum tormentorii (Asphodelaceae), Scaevola taccada (Goodeniaceae), and 

more rarely with Latania loddigesi (Arecaceae) and Dicliptera falcata (Acanthaceae). 

There is, however, a number of invasive alien plants that appear to be encroaching on the 

Cynanchum’s habitat, including the fi re prone grass Heteropogon contortus and other 

aggressive weeds like Flacourtia indica (Salicaceae) and Opuntia vulgaris (Cactaceae) 

that have already developed into dense stands or thickets elsewhere on the islet.

D

ISCUSSION



 

The  fl ora  of  Gunner’s  Quoin  was  thoroughly  surveyed  at  least  three  times 

(B

ULLOCK


et al. 1983, D

ULLOO


 1994, MWF 2003) since its description in the 1930’s 

(V

AUGHAN



 & W

IEHE


 1937). It thus appears surprising that the new Cynanchum species 

covering a patch of several dozen metres across was discovered only in December 2003. 

However, while some surveys genuinely missed the plant (V

AUGHAN


 & W

IEHE


 1937, 

MWF 2003), others appeared to have located but misidentifi ed it. Thus Bullock et al.

(1983)  recorded  an  alien  tree  weed,  Euphorbia  tirucalli  (Euphorbiaceae)  where  we 

discovered C. scopulosum.

 

Another survey by B



ELL

et al. (1994) mentioned a clump 

of  E.  tirucalli  where  we  later  found  the  Cynanchum  colony.  In  fact,  C.  scopulosum

superfi cially resembles E. tirucalli from a distance. Infertile herbarium samples of the 

two species can also be very similar. We found no E. tirucalli on the islet. 



Fig 1. Distribution of Cynanchum scopulosum on Gunner’s Quoin Islet Nature Reserve, 

north of Mauritius.



10

It is fortunate that there was no attempt to eradicate the misidentifi ed Cynanchum

during restoration of the islet like was successfully done with rats, hares and rabbits 

(B

ELL



 2002). But it is worrying that a plant found on nearby Serpent Island in 2003 

and identifi ed as a weed by the expedition members, which comprised no experienced 

botanist,  has  been  destroyed  and  that  no  sample  was  kept  (T

ATAYAH


  &  C

OLE


  2004). 

There exists also the unfortunate habit on Mauritius to weed  Cynanchum spp. from 

areas managed for conservation because it is a toxic plant. Weeding of Cynanchum has 

been reported from Ile aux Aigrettes Nature Reserve (A. K

HEDUN

 pers. comm. 2004), 



Perrier  Nature  Reserve  and  Mondrain  Private  Reserve  (G.  D’ A

RGENT


,  pers.  comm. 

2004). Cynanchum seems now eradicated from the latter two sites.



Conservation status

 

C. scopulosum is known only from Gunner’s Quoin. A second expedition there 

in August 2004, revealed a tiny second clump of two plants on a ridge 100m from the 

fi rst colony bringing the total area occupied by the species to less than 0.1ha in two 

separate places (Fig. 1). The species thus has one of the most restricted range for an 

endemic plant on Mauritius. 

This fact alone exposes it to a high threat of extinction in the wild. The colony 

may thus easily be destroyed by fi re, the more so that much of the islet is today invaded 

by fi re prone Heteropogon contortus, and also receive illegal visitors regularly lighting 

camp fi res. Indeed, devastation by fi re has been recorded in the past (D

ULLOO


 1994) and 

probably explains partly at least both why the islet is so poor in native plants and why 

the Cynanchum itself has such a restricted and marginal distribution. 

Fig. 2.  Cynanchum scopulosum on Gunner’s Quion - young plant and fl owers.


11

Destruction of the colony by a landslide appears likely as this is a common 

feature on the island as indicated by numerous rock fall scars on the sea facing cliffs. 

The site where Cynanchum grows is also gradually being invaded by alien plants. Thus, 

the species should be regarded as Critically Endangered (CR B1ab(iii) + 2ab(iii); D). 

Given  these  risks,  we  recommend  that  the  plant  be  propagated  to  several 

locations of suitable ecology on the islet itself, including well inland. Also the proximity 

and similar climate and geology of Round and Flat Islands, and their ongoing restoration 

programmes make them ideal sites to receive translocated C. scopulosum. Establishing 

these populations would greatly reduce the plant’s extinction risks in the wild. It is quite 

conceivable that C. scopulosum might have once grown on these two islets given the 

plant’s effi ciently wind-dispersed seeds and the fact that many native species are known 

not to have survived the human-induced ecological devastation of both islets. 

Extinction  risks  will  also  be  minimised  by  maintaining  the  plant  in  ex-situ

facilities.  C.  scopulosum  is  easy  to  propagate. All  12  cuttings  taken  rooted  without 

rooting  hormones  within  5-6  weeks.  These  are  being  grown  in  the  arboreta  of  the 

National  Parks  and  Conservation  Service  and  of  the  Mauritius  Herbarium  (MSIRI). 

Propagation by seeds, although advisable, seems less easy for the moment due to the 

currently rather rare expeditions to the islet and since the plants appear to set very few 

fruits at a time.

A

CKNOWLEDGEMENTS



 

We  are  grateful  to  Mr Yousouf  Mungroo  and  Mr  Kevin  Ruhomaun  of  the 

National Parks and Conservation Service, for having organised the trip to the islet. C.B. 

thanks J-C. Autrey for reviewing the draft. 

R

EFERENCES



B

AKER


, J.G. 1877. Flora of Mauritius and the Seychelles. L. Reeve & Co, London.

B

ELL



,  B.D.  2002.  The  eradication  of  alien  mammals  from  five  offshore  island  of 

Mauritius,  Indian  Ocean.  In:  V

EITCH

  C.R.  &  C



LOUT

,  M.N.  (eds).  Turning  the 



tide: the eradication of invasive species. Occasional Paper of the IUCN Species 

Survival Commission, No. 27. p. 40-45.

B

ELL


,  B.D.,  D

ULLOO


,  E.  &  B

ELL


,  M.  1994.  Mauritius  offshore  islands  survey  report 

and management plan

Wildlife Management International Ltd. Wellington, New 



Zealand.

 

176pp.



B

OJER


, W. 1837. Hortus Mauritianus. Imprimerie d’Aimé Mamarot et Compagnie, Port 

Louis, Maurice.

B

OSSER


,  J.  &  M

ARAIS


, W.  2005.  122. Asclepiadacées.  Flore  des  Mascareignes.  IRD/

MSIRI/Kew. Paris. 

B

OSSER


, J., C

ADET


, T

H

.,  G



UEHO

, J. & M


ARAIS

, W.  1976-onwards. Flore des Mascareignes 



– La Reunion, Maurice, Rodrigues

––

. MSIRI/ORSTOM-IRD/ Kew. 

B

OSSER


, J. & F

LORENS


, D. 2000. Syzygium guehoi (Myrtaceae), nouvelle espèce de l’île 

Maurice. Adansonia  22(2): 183-186. 

B

ULLOCK


, D.; N

ORTH


, S. & G

REIG


, S. 1983. Round Island Expedition 1982 – Final Report.

––

Unpublished Report.



12

C

AMOIN



,  G.F.,  M

ONTAGGIONI

,  L.F.  &  B

RAITHWAITE

,.C.J.R.    2004.  Late  glacial  to  post 

glacial sea levels in Western Indian Ocean. Mar. Geo. 2006: 119-146.

D

ULLOO


, M.E. 1994. Botanical survey of Gunners’ Quoin, Mauritius. Revue Agricole et 

Sucrière de l’Ile Maurice

’’

73(1-2): 27-36. 

G

UÉHO



, J. 1988. La végétation de l’île Maurice. Ed. de l’Ocean Indien, Mauritius.

IUCN 2001. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2001 - Categories and Criteria 



v. 3.1 International Union for Conservation of Nature, Gland, Switzerland. 

M

ABBERLEY



, D.J. 1997. The Plant-Book. A portable dictionary of the vascular plants

Second edition. Cambridge University Press.

M

ONTAGGIONI



, L. & N

ATIVEL


, P. 1988. La Réunion Ile Maurice: Geologie et apercus 

biologiques. Guides Geologiques Regionaux. Masson.

MWF 2003. Plant list for Gunner s Quoin islet. 



’’

Unpublished report. Mauritius Wildlife 

Foundation, Vacoas.

R

OBERTS



,  D.L.,  F

LORENS


  V.F.B.,  B

AIDER


  C.  &  B

OSSER


,  J.  2005. Taeniophyllum  coxii

(Summerh.) Summerh. (Orchidaceae): a new record for Mauritius, Indian Ocean. 



Kew Bull. 59: 493-494.

S

TEVENS



, P.F. 2001-onwards. Angiosperm Phylogeny Website. Version 6, May 2005. 

http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/research/APweb/. Accessed 10 March 2006.

T

ATAYAH


, V & C

OLE


, N. 2004. Report of expedition to Serpent Island (25-26 November 

2003). Unpublished report, Mauritius Wildlife Foundation. Vacoas.

V

AUGHAN



, R.E. 1937. Catalogue of the flowering plants in the herbarium. Maur. Inst. 

Bull. 1(1): 5-120.

V

AUGHAN



,  R.E.  &  W

IEHE


,  P.O.  1937.  Studies  on  the  vegetation  of  Mauritius  I.  A 

preliminary survey of the plant communities. J. Ecol. 15(2): 289-343.




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə