Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə14/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   41

Vertebrate Fauna Survey Site Selection 
Selection  of  trapping  sites  was  based  on  a  review  of  the  land  systems  and  soil‐landscapes 
present  within  the  Study  Area  and  an  on‐ground  reconnaissance  of  the  fauna  habitats 
present.  Survey  sites  (both  trapping  and  opportunistic)  were  placed  in  87%  of  all  land 
systems and soil‐landscapes present within the Study Area, with trapping sites placed in 80% 
of  all  major  (i.e.  that  comprised  over  1.5%  of  the  Study  Area)  land  systems  and 
soil‐landscape areas. 
The  survey  sections  and  the  resultant  sampling  sites  are  shown  in  Figure  5‐23.  Site 
descriptions and additional information is provided in Appendix 2. 
 

Figure 5-23  Fauna survey sections and sampling locations

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
86
Vertebrate Fauna Survey Methodology 
Four fauna databases (DEWHA Protected Matters, DEC Threatened and Priority Fauna, DEC 
NatureMap and Birds Australia Birdata) and 15 previous publications (see Appendix 2) were 
consulted  to  determine  the  fauna  species  (in  particular  conservation  significant  species) 
likely to occur within the Study Area. Based on the results, species lists were prepared and 
areas to be surveyed targeted. 
The  survey  was  undertaken  using  a  variety  of  sampling  techniques,  both  systematic  and 
opportunistic.  Systematic  sampling  refers  to  data  methodically  collected  over  a  fixed  time 
period  in  a  discrete  habitat  type,  using  an  equal  or  standardised  sampling  effort.  The 
resulting  information  can  be  analysed  statistically,  facilitating  comparisons  between  sites. 
The systematic sampling included traps, avifauna surveys and bat echolocation recordings. 
Eight trapping sites were established in five Rail Corridor sections (OPR‐B & OPR‐MD, OPR‐C, 
OPR‐D, OPR‐E, and OPR‐F). Four trapping sites were established in OPR‐A and five trapping 
sites were established in OPR‐WR, giving a total of 49 trapping sites.  
Opportunistic sampling includes data collected non‐systematically from both fixed sampling 
sites  and  as  opportunistic  records  from  chance  encounters  with  fauna.  Opportunistic 
sampling  methods  included  nocturnal  searching  (transects  and  ground  searches),  diurnal 
searching  (e.g.  beneath  bark  and  stones,  investigating  burrows  etc.),  and  opportunistic 
sightings  (including  tracks,  scats  nests  etc).    All  opportunistic  surveys  were  conducted  in 
areas  containing  fauna  habitats  not  sampled  by  trapping  sites  and  areas  that  were 
considered  prospective  for  conservation  significant  fauna.  Up  to  16  opportunistic  surveys 
were carried out within each section of a potential Rail Corridor. 
Targeted  surveying  to  determine  the  presence  of  Conservation  Significant  Fauna  was  also 
carried  out  on  the  basis  of  habitats  observed  during  surveying.    Specific  searches  were 
undertaken,  using  both  systematic  and  opportunistic  survey  methodology,  for  Malleefowl, 
Western Spiny‐tailed Skink, Slender‐billed Thornbill, Rufous Fieldwren, Southern Heathwren, 
Bush‐stone curlew, and Lerista eupoda. 
All site locations, including trapping and opportunistic sites, plus regional trapping locations, 
are mapped in Figure 5‐23.  
The  level  of  survey  adequacy  was  estimated  using  Species  Accumulation  Curves.  An 
examination of the Species Accumulation Curves generated from the trapping data indicates 
that the majority (82% – 97%) of fauna in each taxonomic group occurring in the region had 
been recorded.  Further information about sampling adequacy calculations can be found in 
Appendix 2. 
5.2.2.2 
Vertebrate Fauna Survey Results 
Fauna Habitat 
Three  primary  fauna  habitat  types  were  identified  within  the  freehold  land  area,  and  six 
within  the  pastoral  land  area  which  were  largely  based  on  vegetation  structure  and 
landforms.  
These  habitat  types  predominantly  follow  the  vegetation  units  described  by  Beard  (1976) 
and Beard and Burns (1976), although some (e.g. granite outcrops) occur at a finer habitat 
scale than what was previously mapped. A description of each of the habitats is summarised 
below. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
87
Table 5‐14  Description of fauna habitats of the Study Area 
Land area 
Habitat 
Description 
Freehold 
Eucalypt woodland 
This habitat type was relatively common within the remnant vegetation in the 
freehold land area and consisted of vegetation dominated by Eucalypts 
(usually York Gum, Eucalyptus loxophleba) but with varying understorey 
constituents and soil types.  
Eucalypt mallee 
This habitat was represented by a single site within the freehold land area.  
Heath 
This habitat is predominantly associated with the mesas of the Moresby 
Range and further inland to a more limited extent. The habitat is limited in 
distribution within the Study Area and therefore represents a vulnerable 
habitat type.   
Pastoral 
Mulga Woodland 
Mulga woodland is the dominant habitat type in the Study Area, varying 
slightly from east to west as a result of changes in climate, soil type, and the 
presence of emergent granite. Dead wood, stumps and peeling bark provide 
habitat for geckos and other small reptiles.   
River and Halophyte 
Vegetation 
 
River vegetation consisted of acacia woodland over moderate to dense 
understorey, often containing salt bush or other halophytic (saline-adapted) 
and succulent plant species.  Mats of leaf litter and dead vegetation had 
accumulated along some watercourses resulting in habitat for reptiles.  Many 
bird species exist in flood plain habitat, particularly areas containing river 
gums. 
Mixed Wattle Scrub 
 
This habitat type occurred within the Yalgoo subregion, in a transition zone 
between the Eremaean and South Western Botanical Provinces.  Here, Mulga 
is less abundant and other acacia species are dominant.  The vegetation 
structure is lower and more dense (Beard 1976).  
Sandy or Stony 
Plain 
This habitat type consists mostly of stony plains, although one trapping site 
was situated within a sandy salt flat.   
Granite Outcrops 
Granite outcrops were recorded throughout the Study Area, typically 
surrounded by mulga woodland.  They provide unique habitats for rock-
dwelling fauna. 
Rocky Ranges and 
Hillslopes 
This habitat type occurs on the small range which runs SW to NE and includes 
both Jack Hills and Weld Range. The Study Area extends through gaps in this 
range and along the foot-slopes. No surveys were carried out in this area, as 
the Study Area impinges on only a small area of this habitat type and previous 
surveys have been conducted within this habitat (Ecologia, 2009c).  
Fauna Assemblages 
Table 5‐15  below summarises the fauna assemblages expected with  the potential  to occur 
(devised  through  literature  and  database  review),  and  the  fauna  assemblages  recorded 
during  the  Ecologia  surveys.  All  species  recorded  in  the  Ecologia  surveys  are  listed  in 
Appendix 2a.  
Table 5‐15 
Fauna species within the Study Area (potential and recorded) 
 
Native 
mammals 
Introduced 
mammals 
Native 
birds 
Introduced 
birds 
Native 
reptiles 
Native 
amphibians 
Total potential fauna assemblages 
36 
13 
277 

130 
18 
Total recorded during current survey 
(Ecologia, 2010b) 
20 11 
125 1 
83 
11 
Potential Conservation Significant 
Fauna (based on database searches 
and the results of previous biological 
surveys in the surrounding region) 
6 - 
22 



Recorded (or high-medium likelihood 
of occurrence) Conservation 
Significant Fauna (see below for more 
details) 
1 - 
15 




 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
88
Vertebrate Fauna Species Recorded 
Table 5‐16 summarises the vertebrate fauna species recorded within the Study Area. 
Table 5‐16  Vertebrate fauna species found within the Study Area 
 
No. of 
Species 
Species 
Comment 
Mammals (Total of 20) 
Dasyurids 

4 species of dunnart (Sminthopsis), 
one false antechinus 
(Pseudantechinus), and the Kultarr 
(Antechinomys laniger
Although no species of conservation significance were 
found, Woolley’s False Antechinus (Pseudantechinus 
woolleyae) is worth noting as it is a specialist rock-
dwelling species that is sparsely distributed throughout 
its range. 
Macropods 
3 Euro 
(Macropus robustus), Red 
(Macropus rufus) and Western Grey 
(Macropus fuliginosus) Kangaroos 

Native 
rodents 

Sandy Inland Mouse (Pseudomys 
hermannsburgensis) and Spinifex 
Hopping Mouse (Notomys alexis

Bats 

5 species of the family 
Vespertilionidae, two Molossidae, 
and one Emballonuridae 
Bats were identified by call.  The Little Broad-nosed Bat 
(Scotorepens greyii), recorded from the OPR-A section 
(Figure 5‐23), is at the southern extent of its range in this 
location.  One of the Molossid species recorded was the 
Inland Free-tailed Bat (Mormopterus sp. 3).  It was 
distinguished from the sympatric South-western Free-
tailed Bat (Mormopterus sp. 4) on the basis of call 
frequency.  The genus Mormopterus is currently under 
review and the designations are based on Adams et al
(1988).   
Echidna 

Short-beaked Echidna 
Short-beaked Echidnas were only recorded in 2 
locations.  This low capture rate is typical of this 
widespread but secretive species. 
Birds (Total of 125) 
Various 125 
125 species spread over 50 families 
Recorded birds included several migratory and nomadic 
species. The IBRA lists 7 bird species as indicators of 
ecosystem health in the Western Murchison and Yalgoo 
bioregions (Thackway et al. 1995). 6 of these species 
were recorded, the Emu, Australian Bustard, Banded 
Lapwing, White-browed Treecreeper, Hooded Robin, 
and Grey-crowned Babbler. The Jacky Winter was the 
only indicator species not recorded, although the Study 
Area lies at the northern edge of its range. 
Reptiles (Total of 82) 
Geckos 17 

Noteworthy records include Ornate Crevice Dragon 
(Ctenophorus ornatus), Pygmy Python (Antaresia 
perthensis) and Pebble Dragon (Tympanocryptis 
cephalus) which were all found at the extremes of their 
range. The Spotted Mulga Snake (Pseudechis butleri) is 
locally endemic to a small area north of Yalgoo, and was 
recorded at several sites.   
Pygopods 6 

Skinks 33 

Dragons 10 

Varanids 6 

Elapids 9 

Python 1 

Amphibians (Total of 5) 
Frogs 5 
3 Hylidae species were recorded - 
Main's Frog (Cyclorana maini), 
Water-Holding Frog (Cyclorana 
platycephala) and Desert Tree Frog 
(Litoria rubella). 2 Myobatrachids 
were recorded - Centralian 
Burrowing Frog (Platyplectrum 
spenceri) and Russell's Toadlet 
(Uperoleia russelli). 
The majority of individuals were observed during and 
directly after rainfall events.   
Introduced Species (Total of 11) 
Mammals  
10 
House Mouse, Red Fox, Cat, 
European Rabbit, Goat, Cow, 
Sheep, Dog, Donkey, Horse and 
Pig 
Much of the Study Area has been adversely affected by 
introduced species. Grazing impacts are evident in all 
areas with some areas severely degraded.   
Birds 1 
Laughing Dove 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
89
5.2.2.3 
Conservation Significant Fauna Legislation 
Commonwealth 
Under the EPBC Act, actions that have, or are likely to have a significant impact on a matter 
of  National  Environmental  Significance  (NES)  require  approval  from  the  Australian 
Government Minister for the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (the Minister). The 
EPBC  Act  provides  for  the  listing  of  nationally  threatened  native  species.  Fauna  species  of 
national conservation significance may be classified as ‘critically endangered’, ‘endangered’, 
‘vulnerable’ or ‘conservation dependent’.  
Two EPBC Act migratory bird species were found during the Ecologia surveys; the Common 
Greenshank (Tringa nebulari), and the Rainbow Bee‐eater (Merops ornatus). 
One EPBC listed reptile species was found during Ecologia surveys, the Western Spiny Tailed 
Skink (Egernia stokesii badia). 
The  EPBC  Act  is  also  the  enabling  legislation  for  protection  of  migratory  species  under 
international agreements including: 
 
Japan‐Australia Migratory Bird Agreement (JAMBA); 
 
China‐Australia Migratory Bird Agreement (CAMBA); 
 
Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (Bonn); and 
 
Agreement  between  the  Government  of  Australia  and  the  Government  of  the 
Republic of Korea on the Protection of Migratory Birds (ROKAMBA). 
State 
Native species in WA which are under identifiable threat of extinction are protected under 
the WC Act. 
Under  the  WC  Act,  the  Wildlife  Conservation  (Specially  Protected  Fauna)  Notice  2008 
recognises four classifications of rare and endangered fauna: 
 
Schedule 1: Fauna that is rare or is likely to become extinct; 
 
Schedule 2: Fauna presumed to be extinct; 
 
Schedule 3: Birds protected under an international agreement; and 
 
Schedule 4: Other specially protected fauna. 
One bird species and three reptile species were recorded that are protected under the WC 
Act: 
• 
Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrines) – Schedule 4; 
• 
Western Spiny Tailed Skink (Egernia stokesii badia) – Schedule 1; 
• 
Gilled Slender Blue‐tongue (Cyclodomorphus branchialis) – Schedule 1; and 
• 
Lerista yuna – Schedule 4. 
In  addition,  DEC  produces  a  list  of  Priority  species  that  have  not  been  assigned  statutory 
protection  under  the  WC  Act.  Species  on  this  list  are  considered  to  be  of  conservation 
priority  because  there  is  insufficient  information  to  make  an  assessment  of  their 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
90
conservation status or they are considered to be rare but not threatened and are in need of 
monitoring. DEC Priority Fauna List categories are (refer to Appendix 2a for definitions): 
• 
Priority 1: Taxa with few, poorly known populations on threatened lands; 
• 
Priority 2: Taxa with few, poorly known populations on conservation lands; 
• 
Priority  3:  Taxa  with  several,  poorly  known  populations,  some  on  conservation 
lands; 
• 
Priority  4:  Taxa  in  need  of  monitoring  –  considered  not  currently  threatened  but 
could be if present circumstances change; and 
• 
Priority  5:  Taxa  in  need  of  monitoring  –  considered  not  currently  threatened  but 
subject  to  a  conservation  program,  the  cessation  of  which  could  result  in  the 
species becoming threatened. 
Five bird species and two reptile species of Priority status were recorded within the Ecologia 
surveys: 
• 
Australian Bustard (Ardeotis australis) – Priority 4; 
• 
Bush Stone‐curlew (Burhinus grallarius) – Priority 4; 
• 
White‐browed  Babbler  (western  wheatbelt  subspecies)  (Pomatostomus 
superciliosus ashbyi) – Priority 4; 
• 
Crested Bellbird (southern subspecies) (Oreoica gutturalis gutturali)‐ Priority 4; 
• 
Rufous  Fieldwren  (western  subspecies)  (Calamanthus  campestris  montanellus)  – 
Priority 4; 
• 
Lerista yuna – Priority 3; and 
• 
Lerista eupoda – Priority 1. 
5.2.2.4 
Conservation Significant Fauna of the Study Area 
A  total  of  twelve  conservation  significant  species  were  recorded  within  the  Study  Area 
(Figure 5‐24 and Figure 5‐25) and a further nine species were considered to have a high or 
medium likelihood of occurrence in the area.   
Twelve  additional  conservation  significant  species  with  the  potential  to  occur  in  the  Study 
Area  were assessed as having a low likelihood of occurrence due to factors such as suitable 
habitat,  distribution  of  species,  and  use  of  Study  Area  (for  details  of  assessment  see 
Appendix 2).  These are:  
• 
Greater Bilby (Macrotis lagotis); 
• 
Black‐flanked Rock‐wallaby (Petrogale lateralis); 
• 
Brush‐tailed Mulgara (Dasycercus blythi); 
• 
Ghost Bat (Macroderma gigas); 
• 
Western Pebble‐mouse (Pseudomys chapmani); 
• 
Ground Parrot (western subspecies) (Pezoporus wallicus flaviventris); 
• 
Shy Heathwren (western subspecies) (Hylacola cauta whitlocki); 
• 
Fork‐tailed Swift (Apus pacificus); 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
91
• 
Cattle Egret (Ardea ibis); 
• 
Grey‐tailed Tattler (Tringa brevipes); 
• 
Common Sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos); and 
• 
Sharp‐tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata). 
Table 5‐17 lists the  conservation significant fauna found in  the Study Area, and Table 5‐18 
lists the conservation significant fauna that were not recorded but are likely to occur within 
the Study Area.  Detailed descriptions of conservation significant fauna recorded within the 
Study  Area  are  provided  in  Appendix  2.  Species  of  NES  listed  under  the  EPBC  Act  are  also 
described further in Section 8. 
Table 5‐17  Conservation significant fauna recorded 
Species 
Conservation 
Significance 
Comment 
Birds 
Common Greenshank 
(Tringa nebulari
EBPC Act 
Migratory 
Found near permanent water in the OPR-E sections of the Study 
Area (
Figure 5‐24
), and there are local records from the Murchison 
River and Lake Austin.  This species is likely to occasionally visit 
water bodies throughout the Study Area.   
Suitable habitat for foraging includes along creeklines and water 
bodies when they contain water 
Rainbow Bee-eater  
(Merops ornatus
EPBC Act 
Migratory 
This species was recorded within the OPR-C and OPR-Fsection of 
the Study Area (
Figure 5‐24
) and there are numerous records from 
the previous rail alignment and the surrounding region. They are 
likely to occur throughout the Study Area. Suitable nesting and 
hunting habitat was found in all sections of the survey. 
Suitable habitat includes open country, most vegetation types, 
dunes, banks. 
Although typically a migratory visitor to the Murchison they may 
breed in suitable conditions.   
Peregrine Falcon 
(Falco peregrinus
WC Act Schedule 

Recorded within the freehold land area at OPR-F (Figure  5‐24).  
Also recorded from the surveys of previous rail alignments, 
approximately 15 km west of Mileura   Suitable nesting habitat was 
found in ranges and rocky breakaways of the Study Area and most 
of the Study Area provides suitable hunting ground.  Peregrine 
Falcons have frequently been recorded in the surrounding area.   
Australian Bustard  
(Ardeotis australis
DEC Priority 4 
Australian Bustards were recorded in all sections of the Study Area 
and appear to be moderately common although with a scattered 
distribution. There are extensive records of the Australian Bustard 
occurring in both the local and wider area.    
Suitable habitat for breeding and foraging exists throughout much 
of the Study Area, which includes open grasslands, chenopod flats 
and low heathland 
Bush Stone-curlew 
(Burhinus grallarius
DEC Priority 4 
Bush Stone-curlews were recorded in the OPR-B section of the 
Study Area (
Figure 5‐24), and there are numerous records from 
the surrounding region. 
Likely to occur along the entire length of the corridor where suitable 
mulga woodland habitat occurs.  May utilise the Study Area for 
both foraging and breeding 
White-browed Babbler 
(western wheatbelt 
subspecies)  
(Pomatostomus 
superciliosus ashbyi
DEC Priority 4 
Species possibly recorded from OPR-F (
Figure 5‐24
); however, 
conservation significant subspecies is very difficult to discriminate 
from other subspecies in the field.  Several records from 30 km 
northwest of Mullewa (1980-1992; DEC records) 
This subspecies intergrades with the nominate subspecies 
between Dongara-Geraldton and so much of its distribution is 
south of the Study Area
 
Preferred habitat is eucalypt woodlands, acacia shrublands 
Crested Bellbird 
(southern subspecies) 
(Oreoica gutturalis 
DEC Priority 4 
Species possibly recorded from OPR-F (Figure 5-24); however, 
conservation significant subspecies is very difficult to discriminate 
from other subspecies in the field.   

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
92
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə