Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə17/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   41

5.2.2.9 
Subterranean Invertebrate Fauna Assessment Results 
Figure 5‐30 shows all records of subterranean fauna collected in the Mid‐West and Geraldton areas 
compiled  from  previous  Ecologia  surveys,  the  WA  Museum  database,  DEC  reports  and  other 
published journal articles.  
Subterranean fauna have been found in 16 of the 30 land systems occurring within the Study Area 
(Table 5‐22).  Subterranean fauna have also been found in 12 additional land systems within the Mid‐
West that do not occur within the Study Area (refer to Appendix 2c). The Mileura system harboured 
the  largest  subterranean  fauna  records  (146  records),  followed  by  Cunyu  (44  records),  both  land 
systems of which are within the Study Area. 
Subterranean  fauna  were  also  recorded  from  three  of  the  ten  soil  landscape  systems  that  occur 
within  the  Study  Area  (Table  5‐22).  Of  these  ten  soil  landscape  systems,  the  Tamala  soil  landscape 
system  had  the  most  records,  with  four  records  of  stygofauna  and  four  records  of  caves  where 
subterranean fauna have been collected. Subterranean fauna were also found in four additional soil 
landscape  systems  within  the  Geraldton  area  that  do  not  occur  within  the  Study  Area  (refer  to 
Appendix  2c).    However,  most  of  these  records  were  from  within  caves  where  subterranean  fauna 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
107
had  been  collected  but  did  not  include  the  accurate  number  of  species  as  the  numbers  included 
cave‐dwelling fauna that is not obligate troglofauna or stygofauna. 
Most  of  the  records  reviewed  for  both  the  land  systems  and  soil  landscape  systems  were  of 
stygofauna, with 270 records compared to 43 troglofauna records. Of these, 219 stygofauna records 
and  40  troglofauna  records  were  from  land  systems/soil  landscape  systems  occurring  within  the 
Study  Area.  Nine  records  referred  to  caves  where  subterranean  fauna  had  been  collected  and 
possibly consisted of both troglofauna and stygofauna (Table 5‐22). 
Table 5‐22  Subterranean fauna records from land and soil landscape systems within Study Area 
 
Description 
Records of 
Stygofauna 
Records of 
Troglofauna 
Land System 
Challenge 
Gently sloping gritty and sandy-surfaced plains with granite outcrops and minor 
breakaways, supporting mulga and some halophytic shrublands. 

 
Cunyu 
Calcreted drainage zones on hardpan; alluvial plains with raised calcrete platforms 
dissected by major flow zones and channels, supporting variable mostly non-halophytic 
shrublands and calcareous shrubby grasslands. 
36 
 

Gabanintha 
Ridges, hills and footslopes of various metamorphosed volcanic rocks (greenstones), 
supporting sparse acacia and other mainly non-halophytic shrublands. 
12 
 
Joseph 
Undulating yellow sandplain system supporting dense mixed shrubland with patchy 
mallees 

 
Jundee 
Hardpan wash plains with variable dark gravely mantling and weakly groved 
vegetation; minor sandy banks; supports scattered mulga shrublands 

 
Kalli 
Elevated, gently undulating red sandplains edged by stripped surfaces on laterite and 
granite; tall acacia shrublands and understorey of wanderrie grasses (and spinifex 
locally). 

 
Mileura 
Saline and non-saline calcreted river plains, with clayey flood plains interrupted by 
raised calcrete platforms supporting diverse and very variable tall shrublands, mixed 
halophytic shrublands and shrubby grasslands. 
131 
15 
Nerramyne 
Undulating plains of sandy-surfaced laterite and weathered granite with low remnant 
plateaux, breakaways and rises supporting acacia shrublands. 

 
Pindar 
Loamy plains surrounded by sandplain supporting York gum woodlands. 

 
Sherwood 
Extensive, gently sloping stony and sandy plains on granite and gneiss below saline 
footslopes of lateritised breakaways and outcrops of weathered rock; mainly supports 
scattered mulga shrublands with understorey non-halophytic and halophytic shrubs. 

 
Tallering 
Prominent ridges of banded ironstone, dolerite and sedimentary rocks supporting 
bowgada and other Acacia shrublands. 


Tindalarra 
Very gently inclined hardpan wash plains with narrow drainage lines and fairly saline 
narrow tributary drainage floors; supports tall mixed acacia shrublands with patchy 
wanderrie banks and narrow tracts of snakewood and bluebush; a major wash system 
in the Greenough River catchment 
11 
 
Violet 
Gently undulating gravely plains on greenstone, laterite and hardpan, with low stony 
rises and minor saline plains; supports mulga and bowgada-dominate shrublands, with 
dense mulga groves and patchy halophytic shrublands 

 
Weld 
Rugged ranges and ridges of mainly Archaean metamorphosed sedimentary rocks; 
supports acacia shrublands; major system of the Weld Range and Jack Hills. 
 

Yandil 
Flat hardpan wash plains, extensively uniform and carrying light to moderate mantles of 
small pebbles and gravels; occasional wanderrie banks and groves; supports mulga 
shrublands, but widely degraded. 

 
Yanganoo 
Almost flat hardpanwash plains, with or without small wanderrie banks and showing 
variable development of weak groving; supports mulga shrublands; the most extensive 
system in survey area. 

 
Soil Landscape System 
Dartmoor 
Level to gently undulating plain and weakly dissected long slopes, much as a relic 
drainage network 

 

Northampton 
Narrow valleys with gently undulating to rolling rises and low hills with an integrated 
drainage pattern. Rocky outcrops common on hillcrests with long gentle slopes and 
alluvial terraces associated with local rivers. Forms much of drainage basin of 
Chapman, Bowers, Oakajee and Buller Rivers  

 
Tamala 
Low hills parallel to the coast, extending 4 km inland and 3 to 7 km wide. Western units 
are moderately inclined to steep, sometimes cliffed to the sea. South of Geraldton they 
form low hills with relic dune lobes and some limestone outcrop. No drainage lines 
except on lithified western faces. Units have been breached by rivers and streams at 
several locations 

 
4 caves where 
species been 
collected 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
108
5.2.2.10 
Suitability of groundwater for stygofauna 
Aquaterra  installed  eight  monitoring  bores  within  the  Study  Area  to  measure  water  chemistry  and 
quality  (Aquaterra  2009b).  Based  on  the  pH  levels  and  conductivity  of  the  groundwater  in  each 
monitoring bore, predictions have been made as to whether the groundwater within the bores may 
provide  suitable  habitat  for  stygofauna.  All  bores  were  within  100  km  of  existing  records  of 
subterranean fauna and most bores showed pH and conductivity (EC) levels suitable for stygofauna. 
Table 5‐23 summarises the water chemistry results of the eight monitoring bores. 
Table 5‐23  Monitoring bores that may contain subterranean fauna 
Bore ID 
Field EC 
(mS/cm) 
pH 
Likelihood of 
stygofauna 
Reasons 
52_MB1 
7.9 
8.2 
Possible 
pH & conductivity are within suitable parameters  
102_MB1 12.2 
4.2  Unlikely 
Conductivity 
is 
within suitable parameters, however pH is 
comparatively low 
249_MB1 
2.5 
8.5 
Possible 
pH & conductivity are within suitable parameters 
300_MB1 >39 
7.0  Possible 
Conductivity 
is high, however pH is suitable 
368_MB1 
2.9 

Unable to comment 
Insufficient data 
400_MB1 


Unable to comment 
Insufficient data 
400_MB2 


Unable to comment 
Insufficient data 
408_MB1 
3.5 
7.4 
Possible 
pH & conductivity are within suitable parameters 
 
 
 

Geraldton
Geraldton
OakajeeOakajee
MeekatharraMeekatharra
KalbarriKalbarri
Mount MagnetMount Magnet
MullewaMullewa
Jack HillsJack Hills
Weld RangeWeld Range
Figure No:
CAD Resources File No:
Drawn:
CAD Resources
02
0
Scale
MGA94 (Zone 50)
6900000mN
200000mE
40km
7000000mN
7100000mN
6900000mN
7000000mN
7100000mN
300000mE
400000mE
500000mE
600000mE
700000mE
200000mE
300000mE
400000mE
500000mE
600000mE
700000mE
g1660_Pub_PER_R_F005.dgn
LEGEND
Existing Rail Network
Major Road
Watercourse
Coastline
Topography
Notes:
Troglofauna and Stygofauna supplied by Ecologia Environment
Groundwater Bores supplied by Aquaterra
Troglofauna
Stygofauna
Project Area
Groundwater
Investigation Bore
Recorded Subterranean
Invertebrate Fauna
Figure 5-30 Location of recorded subterranean invertebrate fauna

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
110
5.2.3 
Surface Hydrology 
5.2.3.1 
Surface Hydrology Assessment 
A desk‐based review of surface hydrology was completed in 2009 by Aquaterra (2009a; Appendix 3), 
which involved the following: 
 
reviewing  available  aerial  photography,  published  reports  and  data  on  surface  water 
resources, and reconciling this information with rail alignment options; and 
 
defining surface water drainage patterns and characteristics within the Study Area. 
5.2.3.2 
Surface Hydrology Assessment Results 
Surface hydrology within the Study Area can be categorised as follows: 
 
external  –  drainage  from  catchments  discharging  to  the  Indian  Ocean  via  rivers  or  other 
watercourses; and 
 
internal  –  drainage  that,  under  normal  flow  conditions,  discharges  to  the  inland  regional 
system of salt lakes. 
External drainage is more typical of the western sector of the Study Area, while internal drainage is 
more  typical  in  the  east.    For  example,  between  Meekatharra  and  Wiluna,  a  system  of  generally 
north  south  drainage  lines,  creeks  and  other  watercourses  drain  surface  flows  into  numerous  salt 
lakes (Aquaterra, 2009a, Appendix 3) (Figure 5‐31). 
The northern portion of the Study Area is characterised by an ephemeral drainage pattern within the 
Murchison  River  catchment.    This  comprises  an  extensive  drainage  network  covering  an  area  of 
about 82,000 km
2
 (Figure 5‐31).  The Murchison River discharges into the ocean at Kalbarri, 110 km 
north of Oakajee. Water quality during flooding is fresh, but turbid, while low flows are brackish and 
saline (Aquaterra, 2009a).  
The  Study  Area  extends  over  a  number  of  episodic  rivers  and  creeks  including  the  Chapman  River, 
Greenough  River,  the  Bangemall  Creek,  the  Sanford  River,  and  Ilkabiddy  Creek,  which  flow  only  in 
direct  response  to  rainfall  events.  Flows  in  the  smaller  stream  channels  are  typically  of  short 
duration,  and  cease  soon  after  the  rainfall  passes.  In  the  larger  river  channels  draining  the  more 
extensive  catchments,  runoff  can  persist  for  several  weeks  and  possibly  months  following  major 
rainfall events such as those resulting from tropical cyclones. 
The catchments within the Study Area have been considerably modified by pastoralism, damming of 
watercourses and mining practices (EPA, 2007c).  

Figure 5-31 Overview of surface water drainage within the Study Area

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
112
5.2.3.3 
Significant Surface Hydrology Characteristics of the Study Area 
Flood Events
1
 
The  most  intense  rainfall  and  flooding  events  within  the  Study  Area  result  from  tropical  cyclones. 
Flooding is therefore sporadic and usually occurs in the cyclone season (summer). Several significant 
flood  events  have  occurred  in  recent  years,  including  Cyclones  Clare  and  Dominic  in  January  2009. 
Widespread  storms and flooding were  experienced in the region  resulting in the  closure of several 
roads,  regional  airstrips  and  the  flooding  of  Yuin  Station  and  some  houses  in  Meekatharra.  It  is 
estimated  that  these  two  events  had  an  ARI  in  excess  of  1000  years  (Aquaterra,  2009a).  The 
magnitude of the consequent flooding was therefore also extremely rare.  
Sheetflow 
Overland  flows  occurring  in  areas  where  there  are  no  defined  channels,  resulting  in  widespread 
flooding of uniform depth, known as sheetflow. Sheetflow zones occur at various locations across the 
Study Area with some vegetation communities, particularly Mulga (Acacia aneura) woodland, being 
dependent on seepage from these surface water flows (Figure 5‐16) (ANRA, 2009). Mulga woodlands 
are common throughout the northern sectors of the Study Area.   
Defined  areas  of  sheetflow  were  not  able  to  be  determined  without  more  detailed  site 
investigations.    These  investigations  will  be  conducted  prior  to  construction  to  determine  culvert 
requirements (refer to Section 7.5). 
5.2.4 
Groundwater 
Initial  desktop  assessments  and  field  groundwater  investigations  of  water  demand,  potential  yield 
and  water  quality  available  for  construction  purposes  were  undertaken  in  2009  (Aquaterra  2010b; 
Appendix  4).  The  objective  of  the  desktop  assessment  was  to  identify  water  requirements  during 
Proposal construction and operation, and assess groundwater availability for this demand. 
The groundwater potential along most of the Proposal Area in the interior zone of the Mid‐West is 
low  to  moderate.    Establishment  of  successful  production  bores  with  acceptable  yields  (1‐3  L/s) 
within the Study Area will demand significant investment in exploration drilling, requiring access to 
as many exploration targets as possible.  The limited drilling programme conducted during Phase 1 in 
2009 has shown approximately a 50% success rate for bores delivering above 3 L/s, but the prospect 
exists  that  local  supplies  may  not  be  found  along  some  portions.    In  addition,  a  limited  number  of 
targets  exist  within  the  Study  Area  and  there  is  substantial  risk  that  exploration  holes  will  not  be 
successful in some areas.  Therefore, groundwater investigations will also concentrate on developing 
water  supply  borefields  in  areas  of  moderate  to  high  groundwater  yield  potential,  within 
approximately 50 km of the Proposal Area (Aquaterra, 2010c). 
5.2.4.1 
Regional Hydrogeology 
From a hydrogeological perspective, the Study Area may be divided into two broad zones – coastal 
and interior, which includes the Northampton Block, the northern extent of the Perth Block, and the 
Murchison Basin (Figure 5‐32). 
In the coastal zone aquifers have been identified in weathered Proterozoic basement, consolidated 
sediment  and  coastal  limestone.  The  Tamala  marine  limestone  and  associated  alluvial  deposits  are 
highly  permeable  and  have  the  potential  to  form  significant  aquifers.  Groundwater  in  the  coastal 
                                                            
1
 A 100 year ARI flood is a definition of a flood that has a 1% chance of occurring in any given year. Therefore an ARI in excess of 1000 years 
refers to a flood that has a 0.1% chance of occurring in any given year (BoM, 2001). 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
113
zone  is  mainly  brackish  ranging  from  1,000‐3,000  mg/L  of  Total  Dissolved  Solids  (TDS).  Although 
bores  in  the  Tamala  limestones  offer  supply  potential,  this  aquifer  system  may  already  be  over‐
allocated, this may constrain or complicate licensing approvals required to abstract this water. 
The  interior  zone  extends  east  from  85  km  from  the  western  edge  of  the  Proposal,  representing  a 
relatively  remote  and,  from  a  groundwater  perspective,  poorly  explored  terrain.  Geologically,  this 
area  is  characterised  by  two  distinct  Archaean  geological  terrains,  gneiss  and  granitoid‐greenstone 
(metavolcanics). 
The  lower  Proterozoic  basement  outcrops  extensively,  but  is  overlain  in  places  by  relatively  thin 
Tertiary  and  Quaternary  deposits,  which  are  associated  with  both  modern  and  palaeo‐drainages. 
Small scattered areas of calcrete (Tertiary age) are exposed in depressions between drainage divides 
and  drainage  channels.  The  greenstone  belts  generally  trend  in  a  north‐west  to  north‐north‐east 
direction  and  are  surrounded  by  several  granitoid  (mafic  and  ultramafic  rocks)  intrusions.  These 
intrusive rocks are highly deformed by structural features (e.g. faults and shears). 
Calcrete,  colluvium  and  valley‐fill  alluvium  form  the  main  shallow  aquifers  in  the  area.  Depths  to 
groundwater  are  typically  shallow  near  the  river  channels  and  creeks,  and  there  are  a  few  semi‐
permanent  pools  where  the  groundwater  table  daylights  in  the  Murchison  River  channel.    Alluvial 
streambed  aquifers  receive  groundwater  recharge  during  creek  flow  events  (generally  associated 
with  cyclones).  Due  to  the  relatively  thin  accumulations  of  alluvium,  the  groundwater  storage 
capacity  is  limited  resulting  in  their  quick  replenishment  and  subsequent  surface  water  runoff 
volumes will be high. 
Alluvial sediments derived from the ancient course of the rivers (palaeo‐channels) are often located 
some distance from the  current  creek  channel.  Most of this older alluvium is  unsaturated  with the 
water  table  occurring  close  to  its  base  or  in  the  underlying  bedrock.  Where  they  do  extend  a 
reasonable depth below the water table, these older alluvial deposits can be significant aquifers. 
The Archaean and Proterozoic basement has low intrinsic permeability. The groundwater potential of 
basement rocks is typically associated with, and limited to, the development of weathering profiles 
and/or  structural  deformation  (e.g.  faults,  fractures).  The  contact  of  highly  deformed  dykes  and 
fractured basement may be a source of groundwater in some parts of the Study Area. The quality of 
groundwater  is  highly  variable  throughout  the  area  and  increased  salinity  is  observed  towards 
drainage lines. The groundwater salinity is expected to vary between 2,000‐7,000 mg/L (TDS) along 
the Study Area, except for a few hypersaline areas. 
In general, the groundwater yield potential is low to moderate along most of the Study Area in the 
interior zone. The success rates of individual bores at exploration targets can be expected to be low 
and the prospect exists that local supplies may not be found along some portions of the route. 
The  regional  aquifer  productivity  and  aquifer  type  for  the  Mid‐West  Region  is  presented  in  Figure 
5‐33 (Aquaterra, 2010b). 
5.2.4.2 
Existing Bores 
A data search was conducted through the Department of Water (DoW) Water Resource Information 
database in 2008 and 2009, for hydrogeological information, such as drilling depths, lithological logs, 
water  levels  and  water  quality  data,  along  the  proposed  rail  alignment.  This  search  returned  a 
considerable  number of  bores within the Study Area (Figure 5‐34), which mostly provide  water for 
station supplies. 
The  majority  of  bores  in  the  area  are  either  investigation,  domestic  or  stock  bores  (current  and 
historic),  and  most  of  these  exploit  the  groundwater  reserves  within  the  shallow  alluvial  aquifers, 
utilising shallow, low‐yielding bores. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
114
A  DoW  data  search  was  also  conducted,  to  assess  current  licensed  groundwater  allocations  in  the 
area (Figure 5‐35). 
The  largest  groundwater  allocation  is  from  a  fractured  rock  aquifer  located  south  of  Meka  Station 
and  along  the  Sanford  River,  at  the  Western  Queen  Mine  (owned  by  Mt  Magnet  Gold).  It  is 
understood that the licensed allocation for this site is 3.7 GL/yr, however this mine is not currently 
operational. 
The  remaining  licences  have  average  licence  abstraction  allocations  of  between  0‐20  L/s  and, 
according to the data supplied, tap the fractured rock, sedimentary rocks and alluvial sediments. 
Existing  groundwater  abstraction  information  in  the  Perth  Basin  and  Northampton  Block  has  not 
been assessed as part of Aquaterra’s report (2009b; Appendix 4), due to delays in receiving data from 
DoW.    However  more  recently  DoW  has  advised  that  groundwater  remains  available  for  allocation 
within both the Arrowsmith and Jurien Groundwater Areas of the Northern Perth Basin. In relation to 
the  East  Murchison  and  Gascoyne  Groundwater  areas,  these  resources  have  a  nominal  allocation 
limit and licences to access these resources are assessed on an impact basis using the department’s 
state‐wide strategic and operational licensing policies and mining guidelines. 
5.2.4.3 
Groundwater Field Surveys  
Phase 1 Survey 
OPR  implemented  the  first  phase  of  its  groundwater  investigation  programme  on  4
th
  November 
2009.  Nine targets were investigated at which a total of 21 exploration holes were drilled including 
six production bores and eight as monitoring bores (Figure 5‐36).  
Where a production  bore was installed, an adjacent stygofauna and water  quality monitoring bore 
was also constructed. 
Yield and water quality results from these groundwater investigations are detailed in Appendix 4. 
 
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə