Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə19/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   41

5.3.3 
Facilities and Infrastructure 
5.3.3.1 
Recreation and Tourism 
Regionally, recreational activity focuses on facilities in Geraldton, the outlying towns, and the coastal 
sector.    In  the  vicinity  of  the  Proposal  Area,  the  coastal  sector  between  the  Buller  River  and 
Coronation Beach is popular recreational destination.  Coronation Beach is the most popular coastal 
recreation area in this coastal sector and is accessed via a bitumen road from the North West Coastal 
Highway (NWCH).  The beach is on a safe and protected section of the coast and is used for activities 
such as windsurfing, swimming, snorkelling, beach fishing and reef harvesting.   
As the regional centre, Geraldton offers a wide range of active and passive recreational and sporting 
facilities.    All  outlying  centres  within  the  region  also  offer  similar  facilities,  although  the  extent  of 
such facilities in these centres is obviously more limited.  
Tourism  activity  also  focuses  on  the  coastal  sector  and  is  centred  within  Geraldton  and  the  larger 
outlying coastal towns.  During the wildflower season however, tourism activity is more widespread 
throughout  the  region  and  areas  of  local  cultural,  historic  and  landscape  interest  attract  tourist 
traffic. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
123
5.3.3.2 
Transport 
The broader Northwest Region is serviced by an established network of primary and lesser roads, and 
in the vicinity of the Proposal Area, the principal routes are: 
 
NWCH; 
 
Great Northern Highway; 
 
Geraldton Mount Magnet Road; and 
 
Carnarvon Mullewa Road. 
The  region  is  also  serviced  by  narrow  gauge  rail  lines  originally  established  to  haul  grain  from  the 
surrounding agricultural area to the Geraldton Port.  Proposals for upgrading of the narrow gauge rail 
link  to  Morawa  as  an  adjunct  of  mining  Proposals  east  of  the  town  have  been  raised  and  a 
connection to this link forms part of the Proposal.  
The Mid‐West region is serviced by the Geraldton Airport.  Approximately 98,325 passengers passed 
through the airport in FY 2008, approximately 90% of whom flew into Geraldton on business (City of 
Geraldton/Greenough, 2009).  A new airport terminal was built in 2001 and is currently regarded as 
adequate  to  meet  passenger  demands  in  spite  of  average  annual  growth  rates  of  18%  (City  of 
Geraldton Greenough, 2009). 
5.3.3.3 
Communications 
Mobile telephone and wireless broadband internet coverage is available within the coastal portions 
of  the  Mid‐West  region.    However,  level  of  service  decreases  further  inland  with  only  a  few 
population  centres  such  as  Mount  Magnet,  Cue  and  Meekatharra  receiving  coverage.    The  City  of 
Geraldton‐Greenough  is  the  only  population  centre  with  access  to  other  communication  service 
providers. 
5.3.3.4 
Power 
There is no significant power supply other than for domestic customers in the vicinity of the Proposal 
Area, and therefore OPR is proposing that the rail development will independently produce its own 
power,  using  containerised  diesel  fuelled  generators,  during  both  Proposal  construction  and 
operation. 
In 2008, the Energy Minister noted that current facilities were not capable of coping with projected 
growth  in  the  Mid‐West  Region.    Through  the  2008  May  State  Budget,  the  Minister  for  Energy 
authorised Western Power to build a 330 kV transmission line from Perth to Geraldton to meet the 
growing demands of the Mid‐West.  This service has not yet been developed.  One of the iron ore 
mining  Proposals  to  the  east  of  Morawa  is  seeking  extension  and  augmentation  of  an  existing 
Western  Power  high  voltage  transmission  line  as  its  power  supply  but  this  does  not  represent  a 
potential source of supply for the Proposal.  
5.3.3.5 
Water 
There is no significant water supply other than for domestic customers in the vicinity of the Proposal 
Area,  and  OPR  is  proposing  that  the  Proposal  will  independently  source  water  from  groundwater 
reserves, during both Proposal construction and operation. 
During  FY  2009  the  Water  Corporation  supplied  the  Mid‐West  with  over  20  GL  of  water  through  a 
mains  pipeline  network  that  spans  2,673  km  (Water  Corporation,  2009).    The  mains  water  supply 
connects a significantly lower proportion of the Mid‐West properties (68.8%) compared with broader 
WA (89.3%).  The average property consumption in the Mid‐West is typical of consumption patterns 
for all WA regions to the north of Perth (Water Corporation, 2009). 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
124
5.3.3.6 
Port 
Ore  was  first  exported  through  the  Geraldton  Port  in  1966.    Iron  ore  production  and  export  is  of 
increasing importance to the Mid‐West, with predictions that the region’s iron ore exports may reach 
70 Mtpa by 2013 (DLGRD, 2006).  This would make the region the second largest exporter of iron ore 
in Australia, behind the Pilbara. 
The  Geraldton  Port  is  one  of  Australia's  busiest  regional  ports  and  provides  a  gateway  to  WA’s 
diverse  Mid‐West  Region.    In  2007‐2008,  exports  accounted  for  96%  of  the  Port's  total  trade,  with 
more  than  half  of  the  Port’s  exports  being  generated  from  iron  ore  and  other  minerals
2
.  It  is  also 
Australia's second largest grain exporter.  A recent upgrade to Berth 5, a dedicated iron ore facility, 
has expanded the export capability of the Port; however this is not expected to be sufficient for the 
future proposed exports of the area. 
5.3.3.7 
Educational, Medical and Retail Facilities 
As the regional centre, Geraldton offers a wide range of educational, medical and retail facilities and 
services.  Such are also available in outlying centres within the region, although the specific services 
and the level of the available facilities are variable.  
5.3.4 
Native Title 
The  Proposal  Area  intersects  a  total  of  four  registered  and  one  unregistered  native  title  claims.    A 
summary of these claims is provided in Table 5‐26. 
Table 5‐26  Native Title claims 
Claimants 
Claim No. 
Registered 
Rail/Claim intersection (approx) 
Overlapping claims 
Naaguja Peoples 
WC97/73 
Yes 
80 km 

Amangu People 
WC04/02 
Yes 
110 km 

Mullewa Wadjari Community 
WC96/93 
Yes 
200 km 

Wajarri Yamatji 
WC04/10 
Yes 
300 km 

Widi Mob 
WC97/72 
No 
100 km 

The  claimant  areas  in  relation  to  the  Proposal  Area  are  presented  in  Figure  5‐37.    OPR  intends  to 
negotiate  a  Comprehensive  Agreement  with  each  group  to  outline  opportunities  for  indigenous 
involvement  in  the  Proposal  and  the  wider  OPR  Proposal,  including  employment,  training  and 
contract arrangements. 
5.3.5 
Heritage 
5.3.5.1 
Aboriginal Heritage 
A  search  of  the  Department  of  Indigenous  Affairs  (DIA)  Aboriginal  Heritage  Inquiry  System  (DIA, 
2009)  indicates  that  there  are  presently  69  Aboriginal  heritage  sites  within  the  vicinity  of  the 
Proposal Area (Figure 5‐38).  Of these the majority (59) are in the Oakajee area with another cluster 
associated  with  breakaways  on  Madoonga  Station.    The  recorded  sites  include  artefact  scatters, 
paintings,  ceremonial  areas,  mythological  sites  and  several  burial  sites.    It  is  anticipated  that  more 
sites will be located as comprehensive ethnographic and archaeological surveys of the Proposal Area 
are currently underway to identify all Aboriginal sites that might be impacted by the construction of 
the Proposal.  
                                                            
2
 Department of infrastructure, Transport And Regional Development, 
http://www.regionalaustralia.gov.au/Info‐geraldton
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
125
5.3.5.2 
European Cultural Heritage 
The  Murchison  and  Mid‐West  regions  have  a  rich  European  Heritage.  Pastoralists  moved  into  the 
area  during  the  1870s  and  settled  large  tracts  of  land  for  sheep  grazing.  The  areas  of  Cue,  Mount 
Magnet  and  Yalgoo  prospered  rapidly  during  the  1890s  gold  rush  with  the  towns  developing  as 
service centres to settlers and prospectors. Much of the local colonial architecture within the towns 
is preserved and heritage listed (Heritage Council of WA, 2009). 
A search of the Heritage Council of WA ‘Places’ database indicates that the Mt Wittenoom, Murgoo, 
Twin Peaks, Yuin, Woolgorong, Wandina and Tallering Station Homesteads are State Heritage listed 
(Heritage Council of WA, 2009). Although the Proposal Area intersects these Stations, all of the listed 
homesteads are outside the Proposal Area. 
 

Geraldton
Geraldton
Dongara
Dongara
Morawa
Morawa
Yalgoo
Yalgoo
Mount Magnet
Mount Magnet
Cue
Cue
Meekatharra
Meekatharra
Mullewa
Mullewa
Murchison
Murchison
Oakajee
Oakajee
AMANGU PEOPLE
AMANGU PEOPLE
NNTT No: WC04/2
NNTT No: WC04/2
Corridor
Corridor
Rail
Rail
Proposed
Proposed
Dalwallinu
Dalwallinu
Gascoyne Junction
Gascoyne Junction
WAJARRI YAMATJI
WAJARRI YAMATJI
NNTT No: WC04/10
NNTT No: WC04/10
WIDI  MOB
WIDI  MOB
NNTT No: WC97/72
NNTT No: WC97/72
MULLEWA WADJARI
MULLEWA WADJARI
NNTT No: WC96/93
NNTT No: WC96/93
NAAGUJA PEOPLES
NAAGUJA PEOPLES
NNTT No: WC97/73
NNTT No: WC97/73
Wajarri Yamatji
Mullewa Wadjari
Naaguja Peoples
Amangu Peoples
Widi Mob
LEGEND
Figure No:
CAD Resources File No:
Drawn:
CAD Resources
g1660_Pub_PER_R_F010.dgn
0
Scale
MGA94 (Zone 50)
Native Title Claims
Source: Landgate - Native Title Spatial Services
50km
Figure 5-38  Registered Native Title claimant areas in relation to the Proposal Area

Meekatharra
Meekatharra
KalbarriKalbarri
Mount MagnetMount Magnet
MullewaMullewa
Figure No:
CAD Resources File No:
Drawn:
CAD Resources
02
0
Scale
MGA94 (Zone 50)
6900000mN
200000mE
40km
7000000mN
7100000mN
6900000mN
7000000mN
7100000mN
300000mE
400000mE
500000mE
600000mE
700000mE
200000mE
300000mE
400000mE
500000mE
600000mE
700000mE
g1660_Pub_PER_R_F019.dgn
LEGEND
Existing Rail Network
Major Road
Watercourse
Coastline
Topography
Project Area
SRE Survey Sites
DIA Registered Site
Notes:
Registered Sites Supplied by Department of Indigenous Affairs
GeraldtonGeraldton
OakajeeOakajee
Jack HillsJack Hills
Weld RangeWeld Range
Figure 5-38  Location of DIA registered heritage sites

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
128

STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT 
Oakajee  Port  and  Rail  (OPR)  is  committed  to  ongoing  stakeholder  and  community  engagement, 
including  open  and  transparent  communication,  and  recognises  the  importance  of  genuine 
stakeholder involvement in the identification of potential issues and concerns, as well as appropriate 
management of construction and operations.  
OPR defines stakeholders as people or organisations with a direct interest in or are directly affected 
by its operations and activities. An understanding of key stakeholder attitudes and issues is crucial for 
OPR  to  support  effective  stakeholder  engagement,  and  to  respond  to  community  concerns  and  to 
guide management of issues. 
6.1 
COMMUNITY RELATIONS AND ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY 
OPR  has  taken  a  proactive  approach  to  liaising  with  stakeholders  and  interested  parties.  OPR’s 
understanding  of  local  attitudes  and  community  issues  has  been  primarily  guided  by  an  ongoing 
program  of  research,  communication  and  consultation  with  key  stakeholders  and  the  broader 
community.  
To  date,  mechanisms  for  engagement  with  and  provision  of  information  to  stakeholders  have 
included: 
 
meetings with regulatory agencies, including Local Government Authorites (LGAs); 
 
personal stakeholder meetings and visits; 
 
briefings and presentations; 
 
functions, including luncheons and sundowners; 
 
hosting visits to the proposed OPR deep water port site, and conducting site briefings; 
 
community access and visits to the OPR Mid‐West Community Office (opened on 14
th
 April 
2009 at 260 Foreshore Drive, Geraldton); 
 
regular contact and communications via correspondence, email and telephone; 
 
media  relations,  including  briefings,  media  site  visits,  news  releases,  advertising,  and 
monthly community updates; 
 
direct mail via letterbox drops (e.g. OPR newsletter ‘Oakajee Quarter’, Project updates, Fact 
Sheets and press releases); 
 
information resources – display, posters, fact sheets, and websites; 
 
community consultation initiatives and interviews; 
 
social impact assessment (SIA) workshops; 
 
sponsorship and partnership projects; 
 
display and information booth at local agricultural shows; and 
 
presentations at industry and business conferences and events. 
Figure  6‐1  summarises  OPR’s  stakeholder  engagement  process,  demonstrating  a  system  of 
communication, engagement, response, feedback and monitoring.  

Figure No:
CAD Resources File No:
Drawn:
CAD Resources
6.1
g1660_Pub_PER_P_F016.ai
External Stakeholder
Engagement Strategy
The Process
Identify the
Issues
Identify the 
Stakeholders
Engage the
Stakeholders
Stakeholder and Issues
Identification Procedure
Complaints and
Enquires Procedure
Stakeholder and Issues
Identification Procedure
Stakeholder Database
Stakeholder Communication
and Participation Prodedure
Some of the ways we identify
issues are...
- Feasibility Studies
- Risk Assesment
- Social Impact Assesments
 (SIA)
- Market Research
-  Feedback from employees &
 contractors
-  Feedback from community
- Media Monitoring
We record this process by:
-  Keeping a log of all
 stakeholder 
engagement
 activities
-  Taking minutes at meetings
- Developing Communications
 Plans
-  Reporting against activities
 and 
milestones
-  Maintaining a stakeholder
 database
-  Reporting on community
  attitudes and issues
Stakeholder: those people or
organisations who have an
impact on, or are impacted by
the operation
This includes those people
who have an interest (not
necessarily financial) in the
operation
Our list of Stakeholders
includes:
-  Government - Local
-  Government - Elected
-  Government - Regional
-  Government - Departments
- Landholders
- NGO’s State
-  NGO’s Mid-West Community
-  Special interest groups, 
 eg 
Fishers
- Media
-  Professional and Industry
 groups
- Indigenous groups
- Residents
- Employees
- Contractors
-  Customers and miners
The ways we engage with our
external stakeholders includes:
-  Briefings and presentations
- Project updates
- Newsletters
- Surveys
-  Community enquiries line
-  Community Liason Group
- Community Offices
- Consultation
- Open days
- Site trips
The Systems
that support it...
PROPOSED METHODOLOGY FOR EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT
What we do
In Practice...
How this is
Recorded...
Feedback Provided: Utilised for Issuses Identification
Figure 6-1  External stakeholder engagement strategy

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
130
6.2 
ENGAGEMENT TO DATE 
In developing the Proposal, OPR has worked closely with the Western Australian (WA) Government’s 
Oakajee Policy Team, relevant government agencies, the Geraldton Iron Ore Alliance (GIOA) and Mid‐
West  stakeholders.  Additionally,  as  summarised  in  Table  6‐1,  OPR  has  participated  in  a  number  of 
conferences  and  other  forums  during  2009  as  a  means  of  disseminating  information  about  the 
Proposal.  
Table 6‐1  OPR 2009 conference/forum participation    
Date 
Forum 
24 - 25 February 2009 
Mining in the Mid-West Conference, Perth 
4 March 2009 
Asia Pacific Port Infrastructure Conference 2009, Perth 
23 - 26 March 2009 
Australian Journal of Mining’s 12th Annual Global Iron Ore and Steel conference; Perth 
12 May 2009 
Committee for Economic Development of Australia Business Breakfast – OPR Project 
25 - 26 June 2009 
Biennial WA Port Authorities Association conference, Geraldton 
22 July 2009 
Mid-West Resources Forum, Geraldton 
9 September 2009 
WA Transport Summit, Langley 
8 December 2009 
Mid-West Mining Development Conference, Fremantle 
10 December 2009 
Chamber of Commerce and Industry (CCI) WA Resource and Energy Projects Service Sundowner: 
OPR Project, Burswood 
31 May – 2 June 2010 
Transfield Worley Services Leading Practices Forum – West Coast 2010, Perth 
In addition to meeting with individual stakeholders, OPR has also undertaken a range of stakeholder 
engagement/consultation initiatives. Table 6‐2 outlines the presentations, briefings and consultation 
OPR has undertaken in relation to the Proposal.   
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
131
Table 6‐2  Summary of stakeholder consultation  
Organisation 
Date(s) 
Local Government 
City of Geraldton – Greenough  
Ongoing, including Council meetings in April, September and October 
2009, and June 2010 
General Meetings in January, April and August 2009 
SIA consultation in July 2009 
Attendance at the Social Impact Assessment (SIA) / Environmental Impact 
Assessment (EIA) workshops in October 2009 and February 2010 
Shire of Chapman Valley 
Ongoing, including Council meeting in October 2009 and June 2010 
General Meetings in April, July, August and October 2009 
SIA consultation in July 2009 
Attendance at the SIA / EIA workshops in October 2009 and February 2010 
Shire of Cue 
Council meetings in September and October 2009 
G10A Board Meeting in June 2009 
SIA Consultation in July 2009 
Shire of Meekatharra 
Ongoing correspondence 
Murchison Zone Meeting in November 2009 
Shire of Murchison 
Council meeting in October 2009 
SIA Consultation in July 2009 
Shire of Mullewa 
Ongoing, including Council meetings in September and October 2009, and 
June 2010 
General Meetings in February, April and June 2009 
SIA consultation in July 2009 
Attendance at the SIA workshop in February 2010 
Shire of Yalgoo 
Council meeting in October 2009 and June 2010 
SIA Consultation in July 2009 
State Government Agencies 
Office of the Environmental Protection Authority 
(EPA) / EPA Service Unit 
General Meetings in December 2008, February and November 2009, 
March 2010 
Briefing in August 2009 
Site visit in May 2010 and April 2010 
Department of Environment and Conservation 
(DEC) 
Ongoing, including meetings with and briefings to the Geraldton Regional 
Office and Perth-based Environmental Management Branch, Threatened 
Species and Communities and Air Quality Branch throughout 2009. 
Site visit in May 2010 
Department of Commerce 
Ongoing correspondence 
Department of Agriculture and Food 
Meeting in September 2009 and May 2010 
SIA consultation in July 2009 
Department of Indigenous Affairs 
Ongoing, including meetings and briefings in Perth in October and 
December 2009, and May 2010 
SIA consultation and workshop in July and October respectively 
Department of Planning (DoP) 
Ongoing 
SIA consultation in July 2009 
Department of State Development (DSD) 
Meeting in January and May 2009 
Department of Transport (DoT) 
Ongoing 
SIA consultation in July 2009 
Department of Water  
Meeting in September 2009 and June 2010 (both in Geraldton and Perth) 
SIA consultation in July 2009 
Department of Education and Training 
July and August 2008 and July 2009 meetings 
EPA 
Ongoing, including meeting with the Chairman in January 2009. 
EPA Board meeting in February 2010. 
EPA Board Site Visit in May 2010. 
Oakajee Rail Infrastructure Group (DSD, Public 
Transport Authority (PTA), DoT, DoP, 
Department of Regional Development and 
Lands) 
Ongoing fortnightly meetings 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
132
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə