Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə21/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   ...   41

7.2 
VEGETATION AND FLORA 
7.2.1 
Overview 
As  detailed  in  Section  5.2.1,  the  following  vegetation  and  flora  characteristics  apply  to  the  Study 
Area: 
 
the flora of the Study Area is diverse, with approximately 1016 recorded vascular species; 
 
26 Beard vegetation associations were recorded in the Study Area.  Seven of these 
associations have potentially been cleared to less than 30% of their pre‐European extent.  
All of these are located in the freehold area, within the Geraldton Sandplains IBRA region; 
 
72 vegetation units were recorded by Ecologia in the Study Area. Vegetation units of 
interest include the Mulga woodlands in the Murchison region and the salt lake 
communities near Weld Range; 
 
within the pastoral area the original extent of native vegetation largely remains, however it 
has been altered through grazing, changed fire regimes, etc; 
 
within the freehold area there has been extensive clearing; 
 
no nationally or state listed TECs were recorded in the Study Area.  Four Priority 1 PEC 
communities of state significance were recorded: 
1.  Jack Hills vegetation complexes; 
2.  Plant assemblages of the Moresby Range; 
3.  Tallering Peak Vegetation complexes; and 
4.  Weld Range Vegetation complexes. 
 
two Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) listed flora 
species  were  recorded  within  the  Proposal  Area  boundaries,  Caladenia  hoffmanii 
(Endangered)  and  Eucalyptus  blaxellii  (Vulnerable),  and  a  further  species,  Drummondita 
ericoides
 
(Endangered),
 
was confirmed as occurring in the Proposal Area using DEC records; 
 
a total of two DRF and 87 Priority Flora taxa have been recorded in the Proposal Area; and 
 
62 weed species were recorded in the Study Area, including three Declared plant species 
(WA): Carthamus lanatusEchium plantagineum and Emex australis. Invasive species are 
more prevalent within the freehold land area than in the pastoral area. 
7.2.2 
Key statutory requirements, environmental policy and guidance 
7.2.2.1 
EPA Objectives 
The  EPA  objective  for  the  management  of  flora  and  vegetation  is  to  maintain  the  abundance, 
diversity,  geographic  distribution  and  productivity  of  flora  at  species  and  ecosystem  levels  through 
the avoidance or management of adverse impacts and improvement in knowledge. 
7.2.2.2 
EPA statements and guidelines 
The following EPA statements are applicable to the Proposal: 
 
EPA Position Statement No. 2 ‐ Environmental Protection of Native Vegetation in Western 
Australia; 
 
Position  Statement  No.  3  ‐  Terrestrial  Biological  Surveys  as  an  Element  of  Biodiversity 
Protection; 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
140
 
Guidance statement 51 ‐ Terrestrial Flora and Vegetation Surveys for Environmental Impact 
Assessment in Western Australia; and 
 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 6 ‐ Rehabilitation of Terrestrial Ecosystems (EPA, 2006). 
EPA Position Statement No. 2 
EPA  Position  Statement  No.  2  provides  an  overview  of  the  EPA’s  position  on  the  clearing  of  native 
vegetation in Western Australia (WA).  In assessing a proposal, the EPA’s consideration of biological 
diversity includes the following basic elements: 
 
comparison  of  development  scenarios  or  options  on  biodiversity  at  the  species  and 
ecosystems level; 
 
no known species of plant or animal is caused to become extinct as a consequence of the 
development and the risks to threatened species are considered to be acceptable; 
 
no association or community of indigenous plants or animals ceases to exist as a result of 
the proposal; 
 
there  is  a  comprehensive,  adequate  and  secure  representation  of  scarce  or  endangered 
habitats within the project area, and/or in areas which are biologically comparable to the 
project area, protected in secure reserves; 
 
if the project is large (in the order of 10 ha to 100 ha or more, depending on where in the 
State)  the  project  area  itself  should  include  a  comprehensive  and  adequate  network  of 
conservation  areas  and  linking  corridors  whose  integrity  and  biodiversity  are  secure  and 
protected; and 
 
the  on‐site  and  off‐site  impacts  of  the  project  are  identified  and  the  proponent 
demonstrates that these impacts can be managed. 
EPA Position Statement No. 3 
EPA Position Statement No. 3 presents the principles the EPA apply when assessing proposals which 
may impact on biodiversity values in WA.  The intended outcomes of this Position Statement are: 
 
to promote and encourage all proponents and their consultants to focus their attention on 
the  significance  of  biodiversity  and  therefore  the  need  to  develop  and  implement  best 
practice in terrestrial biological surveys; and 
 
to enable greater certainty for proponents in the environmental impact assessment process 
by defining the principles the EPA will use when assessing proposals which may impact on 
biodiversity values.
 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 51 
EPA  Guidance  Statement  No.  51  provides  guidance  on  standards  and  protocols  for  terrestrial  flora 
and  vegetation  surveys,  particularly  those  undertaken  for  the  environmental  impact  assessment  of 
proposals 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
141
7.2.2.3 
Applicable Legislation and Policy 
State legislation 
The conservation of vegetation and flora is covered primarily by the following legislation: 
 
Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (WC Act); 
 
Environmental Protection Act 1986 (EP Act); and 
 
Conservation and Land Management Act 1984. 
In  WA,  all  flora  native  to  the  State  are  protected  under  the  WC  Act  and  threatened  flora  must  be 
‘declared’ and listed in the Wildlife Conservation (Rare Flora) Notice 2008.  DRF are species that have 
been  adequately  searched  for,  and  are  deemed  to  be  either  rare,  in  danger  of  extinction,  or 
otherwise in need of special protection. 
DEC maintains a list of TECs and PECs.  Possible TECs that do not meet survey criteria or that are not 
adequately  defined  are  listed  as  PECs  under  Priorities  1,  2  and  3.  Ecological  communities  that  are 
adequately known, are rare but not threatened, or meet criteria for Near Threatened, or that have 
been recently removed from the threatened list, are placed in Priority 4.  Conservation Dependent 
ecological communities are placed in Priority 5. 
National legislation 
The conservation of vegetation and flora is addressed primarily by the EPBC Act. 
In 1974, Australia became a signatory to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered 
Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).  An official list of endangered species was prepared in 
response to this signing and is regularly updated.  This listing is administered through the EPBC Act.  
The current list differs from the various State lists though some listed species are common. 
Strategies and policies 
The  State  and  Commonwealth  governments  have  endorsed  the  National  Strategy  for  the 
Conservation of Australia’s Biological Diversity (Commonwealth of Australia 1996) and the National 
Strategy for Ecologically Sustainable Development (Commonwealth of Australia 1992).  The strategies 
address the conservation of Australia’s biological diversity by defining several guiding principles. 
Other applicable policies and strategies for the management of flora include: 
 
Environmental Weed Strategy for WA (DEC, 1999); and 
 
Conservation and Land Management (CALM) Policy Statement No 9, Conserving Threatened 
Species and Ecological Communities (CALM, 1999). 
7.2.3 
Aspects and Impacts 
The  environmental  aspect  identified  as  posing  the  most  significant  risk  to  both  general  and 
conservation significant vegetation and flora within the Proposal Area is vegetation clearing. 
Potential impacts as discussed within this section refer to both direct impacts on flora and vegetation 
from  vegetation  clearing,  and  indirect  impacts  on  sheet‐flow  dependant  vegetation  as  a  result  of 
changes to surface water hydrology as a result of the Proposal.   
The Proposal is expected to require the disturbance of approximately 7000 ha of land.  It is expected 
that 6000 ha of native vegetation will need to be cleared, of which a maximum of 100 ha is within the 
freehold area, and the remainder is in the pastoral area. 
Other environmental aspects identified as being of less risk to vegetation and flora include: 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
142
 
ore haulage (dust emissions); 
 
groundwater extraction; 
 
vehicle, machinery activity; and 
 
hydrocarbon storage and management. 
Impacts to vegetation associated with Proposal activities may include: 
 
Direct removal of vegetation: Loss of vegetation due to clearing; 
 
Increase  in  weeds:  Weeds  may  be  transported  to  unaffected  areas  by  moving  seeds 
between  locations  as  a  result  of  construction  activities  such  as  topsoil  movement  and 
storage,  earthmoving  equipment  and  light  vehicles.    This  decreases  vegetation  condition, 
can  reduce  native  vegetation  cover  and  diversity,  and  alter  population  dynamics  within 
vegetation communities; 
 
Loss of condition due  to increase in  erosion or sedimentation:  Erosion is predominantly 
caused  by  vegetation  clearing,  as  the  vegetation  plays  a  role  in  reinforcing  the  soil 
structure.  Changed drainage/surface water characteristics can also lead to erosion; 
 
Impacts on local drainage causing impacts on vegetation (including sheetflow dependent 
vegetation): Rail Corridors and borrow pits can impede the flow of surface water (including 
sheetflow) down slope, resulting in a runoff water reduction on the downstream side, thus 
affecting  downstream  vegetation.  Mulga  trees  are  particularly  susceptible  to  subtle 
changes in surface water distribution patterns; 
 
Damage  to  vegetation  from  uncontrolled  or  unintentional  fire:  The  Proposal  Area  is 
predominantly  dry  for  most  of  the  year  and  therefore  fire  events  can  start  easily  and 
quickly, and construction and operational works increase fire risk e.g. from sparks, vehicles, 
cigarettes, flammable liquids, or welding; and 
 
Fragmentation:  Clearing  increases  fragmentation  of  vegetation  and  flora  populations, 
therefore  reducing  the  strength  of  the  populations  and  increasing  edge  effects.    Loss  of 
diversity, cover and/or condition of vegetation can result; and 
 
Loss of condition due to dust settlement: Dust during construction or operation may cause 
increased  dust  settlement  on  vegetation  immediately  surrounding  construction  or 
operational areas. 
7.2.4 
Vegetation and Flora Impact Assessment 
For  this  assessment,  the  significance  of  the  loss  or  disturbance  of  vegetation  and  flora  by  the 
Proposal was determined by considering: 
 
regional abundance of the vegetation communities; 
 
representation in existing or proposed conservation reserves; 
 
the presence of Priority or Declared Rare Flora species; and 
 
the presence of threatening processes (e.g. weeds). 
The assessment of the significance of impacts (following the application of management measures) 
on significant flora was on the basis of change in the distribution and abundance of EPBC Act listed, 
Declared Rare and Priority Flora species, and compliance with the Wildlife Conservation Act 1950. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
143
The impact assessment within the following section is based on the following sources scales of survey 
data:  
 
detailed scale ‐ Study Area surveys undertaken  by  Ecologia  (2010a) incorporating findings 
from previous flora surveys; and 
 
regional scale Beard and Burns (1976) vegetation mapping, which is the only data available 
for comparison at a regional scale (Geraldton Sandplains Bioregion). 
Indicative Proposal component disturbance areas are detailed in Table 7‐1. It is estimated that up to 
100 ha of native vegetation will need to be cleared through the freehold area. 
Table 7‐1  Estimated area of disturbance 
Component 
Main Line  (ha) 
Weld Range Spur (ha) 
Mullewa Rail Spur (ha) 
Rail formation 
1850 
100 
70 
Construction Camps 
600 


Borrow Areas 
1100 
70 
50 
Quarries 150 


Access Roads 
2100 
100 
80 
Water Bores 
100 
10 
10 
Laydown Areas 
320 
10 
10 
Fibre 
Optic 
Cable 300 20 
10 
Total Disturbance Areas 
6510 
310 
230 
7.2.4.1 
Priority Ecological Communities 
Four Priority 1 PECs occur within the Proposal Area; Jack Hills, Moresby Range, Tallering Peak and 
Weld Range vegetation complexes (see Table 5‐7 for details).
 
PECs  will  not  be  directly  impacted  by  the  Proposal as  they  have  been  considered  a  non‐negotiable 
constraint for Rail Corridor alignment.  All PECs will be avoided and a 50 m buffer will be put in place 
around these areas for both construction and operation.   
As all PECs are associated with ranges and peaks, it is unlikely they will be significantly impacted by 
the Proposal through indirect effects such as changes to surface water flows, erosion, sedimentation, 
or  exposure  to  wastes  or  hydrocarbon  leaks
.  
The  buffer  area  will  also  minimise  potential  direct 
impacts to PECs from fire, weed spread, and dust. 
7.2.4.2 
Significant vegetation communities 
Both Beard (1976) vegetation association mapping and Ecologia vegetation unit mapping were used 
to determine significant vegetation communities, in conjunction with data for the IBRA subregions. 
Beard vegetation associations 
A systematic survey of native vegetation was undertaken in the 1970s, which described vegetation 
systems in WA.  The Geraldton area was mapped at 1:250,000 scale by Beard and Burns (1976), with 
the dataset being converted to a digital form by DAFWA (2006). This vegetation association dataset 
has  been  used  to  determine  the  significance  of  vegetation  at  the  Geraldton  Sandplains  Bioregion 
scale. 
  
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
144
A vegetation association was determined to be significant if less than 30% of the communities’ pre‐
European extent remained, based on the following criteria provided in EPA Position Statement 2: 
i. 
The  “threshold  level’  below  which  species  loss  appears  to  accelerate  exponentially  at  an 
ecosystem  level  is  regarded  as  being  a  level  of  30%  of  the  pre‐clearing  extent  of  the 
vegetation type 
ii. 
A level of 10% of the original extent is regarded as being a level representing “endangered” 
iii. 
Clearing which would put the threat level into the class below should be avoided  
iv. 
From a biodiversity perspective, stream reserves should generally be in the order of at least 
200 m wide 
As clearing is limited in the pastoral area, only the freehold area contained vegetation units with less 
than  30%  of  their  pre‐European  extent  remaining.    The  freehold  area  is  entirely  within  the 
boundaries  of  the  Geraldton  Sandplains  Interim  Biogeographic  Regionalisation  of  Australia  (IBRA) 
region.  
Four vegetation associations mapped in the Proposal Area have been identified as endangered, that 
is,  having  less  than  10%  of  their  pre‐European  extents  remaining  within  the  Geraldton  Sandplains 
(GS) IBRA region (EPA, 2000a and WAPC, 2010).  A further eight vegetation associations mapped in 
the Proposal Area have been identified as vulnerable, that is, having greater than 10% but less than 
30% of their pre‐European extents remaining within the IBRA region (EPA, 2000a and WAPC, 2010).  
Table  7‐2  lists  the  twelve  significant  vegetation  associations  within  the  Geraldton  Sandplains  IBRA 
region. 
Table 7‐2  Beard vegetation associations within the Proposal Area with <30% of their pre‐European 
extent remaining 
Unit Code 
Pre-European 
extent in WA (ha) 
Pre-European extent 
in GS region (ha) 
Degree of endemism 
(% of total pre-
European extent 
within GS region)  
Current extent 
remaining in 
the GS region 
% of original 
extent 
remaining in 
the GS region 
a33Sc* 
3,478 
1,749 
Moderate (50) 
370 
21.1 
acSc* 
495,385 
118,103 
Low (24) 
6,422 

ceLr a9Si* 
511,008 
1,248 
Low (0.24) 


e6,8Mi 
796,448 
2,194 
Low (0.28) 
117 
5.3 
e6c5Mr a9,19Si* 
56,427 
17,554 
Moderate (31) 
4,617 
26 
e6Mr a19Si* 
184,571 
184,571 
High (100) 
31,410 
17 
e6Mr eaSi* 
97,368 
96,821 
High (99) 
7,470 

k1, 3Ci 
64,719 
4,454 
Low (7) 
1,145 
25.7 
mhSc* 51,880 
51,880 
High 
(100) 
14,221 
27 
x2SZc* 328,738 
328,738 
High 
(100) 
43,126 
13 
x3SZc* 580,547 
507,874 
Moderate-High 
(87) 
52,364 
10.3 
x3SZc/acSc* 82,081  82,081  High 
(100) 9,276 11 
As  all  vegetation  units  presented  in  Table  7‐2  have  less  than  30%  of  their  pre‐European  extent 
remaining  within  the  Geraldton  Sandplains  IBRA  region,  they  are  all  considered  to  be  vulnerable 
regionally.  However, due to the narrow linear nature of the Proposal, it is unlikely that the Proposal 
will result in a significant impact to any one vegetation association.  The Proposal will avoid all native 
vegetation in the freehold area where practicable (there are some sections of the Rail Corridor that 
cannot avoid some vegetated areas). 
Associations  a33Sc,  acSc,  ceLr  a9Si,  e6,8Mi  and  e6c5Mr  a9,19Si  are  present  within  the  Geraldton 
Sandplains  bioregion  but  also  occur  extensively  outside  the  bioregion.    The  extent  to  which  these 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
145
associations have been cleared elsewhere in the state is not available; therefore the current extent 
cannot be determined.  It is assumed that since the degree of clearing diminishes further to the east, 
due to the lower levels of agricultural and urban development, these associations have a higher level 
of preservation, albeit in variable condition due to grazing, than is reported in Table 7‐2. 
Vegetation associations acSc, ceLr a9Si, e6Mr a19Si, mhSc, x2SZc and x3SZc all have more than 95% 
of  their  current  extent  located  outside  of  the  Proposal  Area,  and  a  very  small  fraction  of  these 
associations within the Proposal Area  will be impacted.  
The distribution of e6,8Mi shows that the association is large and widespread, and of the total area 
of the Beard association, only 0.04% of its current extent occurs within the Proposal Area.  
Based  on  the  known  current  extent  of  e6c5Mr  a9,19Si  in  the  Geraldton  Sandplains  region,  24% 
occurs within the Proposal Area, however this association is not endemic to this region (31% of the 
total area is in the Geraldton Sandplains). 
k1,3Ci is a small and restricted Beard association that is mapped as 0.2% of the Proposal Area. Of the 
total pre‐European extent of the Beard unit, 0.7% occurs within the Proposal Area.  This unit is not 
endemic to the Geraldton Sandplains region (7% of its total is in the Geraldton Sandplains region). 
e6Mr eaSi and x3SZc/acSc are more endemic to the Geraldton Sandplains Region, and considered to 
be  two  of  the  most  significant  associations  when  it  comes  to  finalising  the  rail  alignment  and 
managing impacts. 
a33Sc is a very small and restricted Beard association that is mapped as 0.5% of the Proposal Area. Of 
the total pre‐European extent of the Beard association, 50% occurs within the Proposal Area.  This 
vegetation is very significant in the Proposal Area as such a large percentage of its total is mapped.  
a33sc occurs at the western end of the Proposal Area.  Most of this vegetation association is skirted 
by the indicative rail alignment (Figure 5‐7). 
e6Mr eaSi is a small and restricted Beard association that is mapped as 3.6% of the Proposal Area. 
This association is very restricted and is likely to be uncommon locally and regionally and is almost 
endemic  (99%)  to  the  Geraldton  Sandplains  region.    Based  on  the  known  current  extent  of  this 
vegetation association in the Geraldton Sandplains region, 10% occurs within the Proposal Area. The 
indicative alignment crosses only one patch of this vegetation association (Figure 5‐9). 
x3SZc is a large and widespread Beard association that is mapped as 1.7% of the Proposal Area. Of 
the total pre‐European extent of the Beard association, 0.6% occurs within the Proposal Area.   Based 
on  the  known  current  extent  of  this  vegetation  association  in  the  Geraldton  Sandplains  region,  1% 
occurs  within  the  Proposal  Area.  This  association  is  highly  endemic  to  the  Geraldton  Sandplains 
region  (87%  of  its  total  area).    The  indicative  rail  alignment  crosses  some  patches  of  x3SZc  (Figure 
5‐9). 
Table 7‐3 below lists the significant vegetation associations that are expected to be impacted by the 
Proposal,  and  the  proportion  of  the  association  expected  to  be  impacted.    As  native  vegetation 
clearing will be avoided where practicable through the freehold area, disturbance will be only from 
the Rail Corridor (average of up to 100 m width in these vegetated areas). Descriptions of each code 
are  listed  in  Section  5.2.1.    Figure  5‐7  to  Figure  5‐9  shows  the  location  of  these  vegetation 
associations. 
 
1   ...   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə