Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə23/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   41

7.2.4.5 
Weeds 
The  pursuit  of  agriculture  in  the  western  portion  of  the  Proposal  Area  has  led  to  significant  weed 
burdens (see Section 5.2.1).  Despite the generally heavy weed burden, some agricultural weeds are 
known to occur on some properties and not on others.  Infrastructure developments can represent a 
significant threat to individual farm biosecurity (Planfarm, 2010). 
Some  weed  species  have  seed  dormancy  and  other  dispersal  mechanisms  that  are  sensitive  to  soil 
movements.  Similarly, ground disturbance creates new germination opportunities for weed species 
and  can  lead  to  a  proliferation  of  weeds.    Weed  management  is  generally  controlled  by  farmers 
within  and  between  farms.    Key  weeds  of  concern  to  farmers  in  the  region  identified  by  Planfarm 
(2010) include: 
 
Skeleton weed; 
 
Pattersons Curse; 
 
Caltrop; 
 
Doublegees; 
 
Saffron Thistle; and 
 
Walkaway Burr. 
Earthmoving, vehicle and soil movements are expected to be the construction activities that pose the 
greatest  risk  of  increasing  weed  dispersal.    With  appropriate  weed  hygiene  methods  enforced  it  is 
anticipated that weed dispersal will not significantly increase as a result of the Proposal. 
7.2.4.6 
Erosion/Sedimentation 
There  may  be  some  localised  erosion  within  cleared  areas  during  rainfall  event  that  may  cause  an 
increase in sedimentation and a potential impact to vegetation.  These impacts are expected to be 
minor, as the Proposal is a narrow feature and in most cases clearing will run perpendicular to major 
flows.    Clearing  within  drainage  lines  will  therefore  in  most  cases  only  consist  of  a  narrow  area 
(approximately 100 m), resulting in a minor impact on a regional scale. 
Further information on surface hydrology management is included in Section 7.5. 
7.2.4.7 
Surface water dependant vegetation 
The Proposal Area lies predominantly in Beard’s (1976) Murchison region of the Eremaean Botanical 
Province.  The  Murchison  region  is  well  known  for  the  dominance  of  mulga  (Acacia  aneura
woodlands, and the extensive flats and plains provide optimum conditions for these woodlands.  

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
153
Mulga trees are susceptible to subtle changes in surface water distribution patterns and disturbance 
to surface drainage flow, as they usually rely on sheetflow from surrounding areas. Rail Corridors and 
associated  infrastructure  have  the  potential  to  impede  the  flow  of  sheet  flow  along  the  slope, 
resulting in a runoff water reduction on the downstream side, thus potentially causing tree deaths. 
Where there are run‐off dependant ecosystems downstream of Proposal infrastructure, bridges and 
culverts will ensure that water distribution shadows are limited.  The spacing and size of culverts will 
be determined after an assessment of the characteristics and slope of each area along the Proposal 
alignment. 
After implementation of the Surface Water Management Plan the predicted outcome for sheetflow 
dependant vegetation is that there may be some loss of sheetflow dependant vegetation in areas of 
sheetflow shadow. However the environmental culverts will be spaced such that the shadow remains 
within the construction disturbance footprint.  This may require environmental culverts to be placed 
at 50 m intervals in some areas. 
The  likelihood  of  loss  of  sheetflow  dependant  vegetation  outside  of  the  Proposal  disturbance 
footprint  is  minimal.  Monitoring  of  vegetation  health  will  ensure  that  the  surface  hydrology 
management measures are suitable. 
7.2.4.8 
Fire 
Fires  may  be  accidently  started  from  works  such  as  welding  and  track  grinding,  through  careless 
behaviour  (e.g.  incorrect  disposal  of  cigarette  butts)  or  poor  management  of  fuel  storage  and 
handling. 
The  implementation  of  an  Emergency  Response  Management  Plan  will  ensure  fire  risks  to  be 
minimised.    OPR  (or  their  contractor)  will  also  be  operating  additional  fire  response  vehicles  and 
equipment  in  the  area,  which  will  be  available  for  other  fire  events  that  occur  (not  caused  by  the 
Proposal).  It is anticipated that this may lead to an overall increase in fire response capabilities in the 
region. 
7.2.4.9 
Vegetation Fragmentation 
Within  the  freehold  area  vegetation  has  been  extensively  cleared  and  as  such  the  remaining 
vegetated  areas  are  highly  fragmented.    The  Proposal  is  not  expected  to  significantly  increase  the 
level of fragmentation in this area due to the low amount of native vegetation to be cleared (up to 
100 ha for approximately 180 km of rail).   
Due to the long narrow nature of the proposed ground disturbance there is a possibility  that once 
rehabilitated, the Proposal may increase ecological corridors between fragmented vegetation areas.  
7.2.4.10 
Dust Impacts 
Dust  may  affect  plants  by  blocking  stomata  and  reducing  photosynthetic  ability.    Vegetation 
immediately  adjacent  to  active  construction  and  operational  areas  such  as  the  Rail  Corridor,  roads 
and borrow areas is at greatest risk of dust deposition. 
Dust  emissions  during  construction  are  expected  to  be  short‐term  (as  the  construction  face  will 
continually  advance)  and  easily  managed  using  simple  construction  dust  controls  such  as  water 
trucks and staged clearing. 
Dust impacts during train operations are not expected to significantly impact surrounding vegetation.  
Train wagons will be open, and there may be some minor amounts of dust emitted, however there 
will be a contractual arrangement between OPR and Mid‐West mining operations outlining that the 
ore  is  to  be  at  a  specified  moisture  content,  which  will  minimise  the  dust  lift  from  the  ore  in  the 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
154
wagons.  The dust levels emitted are not expected to cause dust deposition at levels that may be a 
risk to surrounding vegetation.   Iron ore dust is not toxic and dust deposition is expected to be much 
lower than what is experienced at the edge of gravel roads in the area. 
Further information regarding dust management is included in Section 7.8. 
7.2.5 
Proposed Mitigation and Management Measures 
7.2.5.1 
Performance Management 
OPR has  developed environmental management objectives, targets and performance indicators for 
vegetation and flora (Table 7‐8). 
Table 7‐8  Vegetation and flora management objectives, targets and performance indicators 
OPR Management Objective 
Target 
Performance Indicators 
Protect conservation significant 
vegetation and flora. 
 
No impact to significant vegetation and 
flora beyond the disturbance areas 
described within this PER 
Use of and compliance with the Ground 
Disturbance Permit system. 
 
Minimise the extent of native vegetation 
disturbance required for construction 
and operation of the Project. 
Total vegetation clearing does not 
exceed that described within this PER. 
Use of and compliance with the Ground 
Disturbance Permit system. 
Vegetation health monitoring. 
 
Control the introduction and spread of 
weed species and protect unaffected 
areas from invasion of exotic noxious 
weeds. 
No new weed species introduced as a 
result of Proposal construction. 
No increase in weed distribution 
throughout the Proposal Area. 
Compliance with weed hygiene 
procedures. 
Weed survey results 
Reinstate an acceptable abundance, 
species diversity and productivity of any 
previously vegetated areas disturbed 
during construction but not required for 
operation. 
Rehabilitate any areas temporarily 
disturbed for construction in line with 
approved completion criteria. 
Completion criteria successfully applied 
to rehabilitation areas. 
Monitoring of rehabilitated areas to 
determine success 
Minimise the potential and 
consequence of a fire event occurring. 
No significant fire events as a result of 
the Proposal. 
Fire events reported and recorded in 
the incident reporting system 
7.2.5.2 
Management Strategies 
The primary  measure used to minimise the  disturbance of significant vegetation communities, DRF 
and  Priority  flora  is  the  suitable  selection  of  disturbance  areas  within  the  Proposal  Area.    As 
mentioned throughout this document, the Proposal Area consists of a corridor of up to 4 km width, 
inside which construction will occur.   
The Rail Corridor alignment and the location of facilities such as borrow pits and turkey’s nests will be 
informed by flora and vegetation restraints, and significant areas will be avoided in the design and 
planning  stages.    In  addition,  clearing  of  native  vegetation  will  be  reduced  to  a  minimum  in  the 
freehold area. 
A  Vegetation  and  Flora  Management  Plan  (VFMP)  will  be  prepared,  and  implemented  during 
construction and operation.  In addition, a Construction Rehabilitation Management Plan (CRMP) will 
be  developed  in  consultation  with  landholders.  A  Surface  Water  Management  Plan  (SWMP)  and 
Emergency  Management  Plan  will  also  be  prepared  and  implemented  which  will  contribute  to 
protecting vegetation and flora.  Impacts to sheetflow are managed under the surface water factor 
(Section  7.5).    Environmental  offset  packages  may  be  considered  for  potential  environmental  loss 
within the freehold areas.  Environmental offset measures will be discussed in conjunction with DEC 
and EPA. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
155
Table 7‐9 summarises the mitigation and management strategies proposed to minimise the impact 
on vegetation and flora, including conservation significant vegetation and flora.  
Table 7‐9  Proposed vegetation and flora management strategies 
Management Strategies 
Relevant EMP  Phase 
Responsible 
Persons 
Vegetation clearing will occur within clearly defined boundaries 
VFMP 
Design & 
Construction 
Construction 
Manager 
All conservation significant locations will be avoided where possible and 
will be visually marked with restricted access 
VFMP Design 

Construction 
Project 
Engineer, 
Construction 
Manager 
Required clearing will be minimised, for example: 
  material from cut rail sections will be used where practicable in 
preference to material sourced from borrow pits to minimise 
clearing; and 
  pre-disturbed areas  will be used wherever possible for temporary 
infrastructure. 
VFMP Design 

Construction 
Project 
Engineer, 
Construction 
Manager 
Throughout the freehold area native vegetation will not be cleared except 
for the purposes of the rail alignment and access tracks where 
alternative routes are not practicable 
VFMP Design 

Construction 
Project 
Engineer, 
Construction 
Manager 
The rail alignment will be restricted to an average disturbance width of 
100 m in width when it passes through areas of native vegetation in the 
freehold area 
VFMP Design 

Construction 
Project 
Engineer, 
Construction 
Manager 
PECs will be avoided and a 50 m buffer will be put in place around these 
areas 
VFMP Design 

Construction 
Project 
Engineer, 
Construction 
Manager 
The impact on active creek beds will be minimised through the use of 
bridges and culverts, to help protect riparian vegetation.  For more 
information see surface water section 
SWMP Design 

Construction 
Project 
Engineer, 
Construction 
Manager 
All proposed disturbance areas that are to be located outside of the 
Study Area will be surveyed for all potential TEC, PEC, DRF and Priority 
Species to the same level as the remainder of the Study Area. 
The results of these surveys will be used to perform the same vegetation 
and flora impact assessments as detailed in Section 7.2 of the PER. 
VFMP Design 

Construction 
Environment 
Manager 
All final proposed disturbance areas will be subject to detailed targeted 
surveys for DRF and the following Priority Flora species prior to 
disturbance: 
  Chamelaucium sp. Yalgoo (P1) 
  Eremophila sp. Tallering (P1) 
  Goodenia lyrata (P1) 
  Gunniopsis divisa (P1)  
  Petrophile vana (P1) 
  Ptilotus tetrandrus (P1) 
  Eremophila arachnoids subsp. arachnoids (P3) 
  Homalocalyx echinulatus (P3) 
  Tecticornia cymbiformis (P3) 
  Thryptomene sp. Moresby Range (P3) 
  Thryptomene sp. Wandana (P3) 
The survey information will be included in OPR databases and 
documentation to ensure that OPR will not disturb beyond the areas 
approved in the PER.   
VFMP Design 

Construction 
Environment 
Manager 
Significant disturbance (>5% of remaining species) of these eleven 
species will be avoided throughout the design and construction phases 
where practicable.  Where significant disturbance is unavoidable, OPR 
will liaise with DEC prior to disturbance. 
VFMP Design 

Construction 
Environment 
Manager 
The Proponent will report the results of further vegetation and flora 
studies to the EPA in accordance with approval conditions 
VFMP Design 

Construction 
Environment 
Manager 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
156
Management Strategies 
Relevant EMP  Phase 
Responsible 
Persons 
Records of the areas and prescriptions used for clearing and 
rehabilitation will be maintained in a Rehabilitation Register 
VFMP Construction 
Environment 
Manager 
Rehabilitation prescriptions will be developed for different vegetation 
types and soil types to include local native species with seed sourced 
locally where possible. A Construction Rehabilitation Management Plan 
will be prepared and implemented in consultation with the landowners.   
VFMP Construction 
Environment 
Manager 
A clearing control system will be implemented to restrict the number and 
extent of cleared areas to the minimum needed for safe and efficient 
implementation of the Proposal.  The system shall include: 
  checks that clearing requirements are consistent with approvals
  GIS information identifying significant flora, fauna and heritage 
locations will be kept on an Environmental Constraints database for 
use when planning Proposal activities; 
  a communication and approval system that requires Management  
signoff; and 
  specifications for clearing. 
VFMP Construction 
Construction 
Manager 
Temporary construction areas will be rehabilitated as soon as practicable 
after construction 
VFMP Construction 
Construction 
Manager 
Completion criteria and monitoring methods will be developed for the 
assessment of rehabilitation progress 
VFMP Construction 
Environment 
Manager 
Topsoil management procedures will ensure that suitable topsoil and 
cleared vegetation is salvaged and stored for use in rehabilitation 
VFMP Construction 
Construction 
Manager 
Direct seeding and/or planting will be undertaken to stabilise surfaces 
and integrate landforms into the surrounding landscape and ecosystems 
VFMP Construction 
Environment 
Manager 
Weed assessments will be made along the corridor prior to significant 
ground disturbance. The assessments will continue on a regular basis 
and include reviews of hygiene controls and weed risks for all clearing 
and rehabilitation activities 
VFMP Construction 
Construction 
Manager. 
Environment 
Manager 
Movement of topsoil between sites where declared or significant weeds 
could be spread to new locations will be restricted 
VFMP Construction 
 
Construction 
Manager 
Initial clearing will occur as close as practicable to first construction 
activities 
VFMP Construction 
Construction 
Manager 
Stockpiled vegetation and topsoil will be stored away from water courses 
to prevent sedimentation 
VFMP Construction 
Environment 
Manager 
A Conservation Significant Flora Register will be maintained throughout 
Proposal activities which will include information such as distribution, 
abundance and relevant biological information 
VFMP Construction 
Environment 
Manager 
Weed hygiene: 
  machinery hygiene procedures will be implemented to manage the 
risks of weed introduction and export to and from the site; 
  all ground engaging equipment will be required to arrive on site 
clean of plant and soil material from other sites or hygiene work 
areas; 
  vehicles will be inspected at random and contract clauses will 
ensure that dirty equipment is compliant with the system; and 
  ground disturbance hygiene areas will include different hygiene work 
areas according to weed risks. 
VFMP Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
The majority of the weed control effort will be at the boundary of the 
pastoral area due to the low concentration of weeds within these areas.   
VFMP Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
Equipment and vehicles used in a weed risk area shall be cleaned down 
and a weed inspection form completed before the equipment is 
remobilised to other parts of the Proposal Area 
VFMP Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
Washdown areas and rumble grids are to be located at key locations 
VFMP Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
Declared weed identification sheets are to be developed, displayed in 
site offices and communicated through site inductions 
VFMP Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
Maintain the Emergency Management Plan such that weed inspection 
reports, records of weed hygiene certificates and weed survey data is 
recorded and assessed.  The Weed Hygiene Program will include 
workforce education to increase weed awareness. 
Emergency 
Management 
Plan 
Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
157
Management Strategies 
Relevant EMP  Phase 
Responsible 
Persons 
An incident will be raised and investigated if there is a non-compliance 
with the Weed Hygiene Program, or if weed survey results confirm that 
the Proposal is causing an increase in population or distribution of weeds 
VFMP Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
The Weed Hygiene Program will be regularly reviewed to ensure that the 
likelihood of reoccurrence is minimised 
VFMP Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
Weed surveys will be conducted as soon as practicable after 
construction to determine whether construction of the Proposal has 
increased the population or distribution of weeds.  If determined that the 
Proposal has caused an increase in the population or distribution of 
weeds corrective actions (spraying, removal etc) will occur after 
consultation with relevant government authorities and weed experts as to 
the preferred course of action. 
VFMP Post-
construction 
Environment 
Manager 
Off road traversing of vehicles will be prohibited unless authorised by the 
Site Environmental Manager 
VFMP Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
Monitoring of vegetation health will be undertaken ensure that the 
surface hydrology management measures are suitable. 
VFMP Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
An Emergency Management Plan will be prepared and implemented to 
limit the risk of inadvertent fire ignition.  The Fire Management Plan will 
include controls regarding vehicle movement and maintenance, 
firebreaks, fire restrictions, fire fighting equipment, hot work procedures 
and training. 
FMP Construction 
& Operation 
Safety 
Manager 
There will be no unauthorised access to constraint areas including areas 
of conservation significance or heritage value 
VFMP Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
Implementation of measures to offset environmental loss, particularly 
related to the clearing of native vegetation in the freehold area.  Such 
measures may include: 
 
support of the Moresby Range Regional Strategy; and 
 
investigation of targeted rehabilitation requirements along the 
Rail alignment. 
Final offset measures will be determined in consultation with EPA and 
DEC. 
- Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
7.2.6 
Predicted Outcome 
Within the freehold area OPR has committed to avoidance of native vegetation with Proposal design 
wherever  practicable.    There  will  be  some  areas  that  will  be  required  to  be  cleared  for  the  Rail 
Corridor,  however  all  borrow  pits  and  other  supporting  infrastructure  will  not  impact  on  native 
vegetation.   
Vegetation within the pastoral area is more evenly spread across the Proposal Area.  The clearing of a 
narrow linear feature through the landscape is therefore unlikely to cause a significant impact to any 
of the significant vegetation units in this area. 
The impact assessment has identified that after mitigation and management measures have been 
applied, the Proposal is expected to result in the following outcomes:  
 
no  PECs  will  be  impacted  by  the  Proposal  as  PECs  will  be  actively  avoided,  and  indirect 
impacts reduced through the provision of buffer zones.  The Proposal Area does not contain 
any TEC’s; 
 
no DRF will be impacted by the Proposal; 
 
no  disturbance  to  vulnerable  Beard  and  Burns  (1976)  vegetation  associations  of  greater 
than 0.2% of pre‐European extent; 
 
impacts  to  significant  vegetation  units  within  the  Proposal  Area  will  be  minor,  with  a 
minimum  of  92%  of  each  unit  remaining  unaffected  by  the  Proposal.    Small  areas  of 
significant vegetation associations will be impacted; 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
158
 
impacts  on  Priority  species  are  all  estimated  to  be  low,  based  on  a  preliminary  indicative 
Rail  Corridor  alignment,  with  the  highest  predicted  population  impact  being  3.8% 
(Eremophila  arachnoids  subsp.  arachnoides).    OPR  has  committed  to  undertaking  further 
surveys  of  disturbance  areas  for  this  species  and  other  nominated  Priority  flora  species 
before the corridor is finalised; 
 
strict controls to prevent the introduction and/or spread of weeds within the Proposal Area 
will be implemented, in order to minimise the risk to vegetation from weeds; 
 
sheetflow  dependant  Mulga  will  not  be  significantly  impacted  due  to  the  installation  of 
environmental culverts; and 
 
consideration will be given to the potential for an offset package for residual environmental 
impacts. 
 
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə