Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə24/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   ...   41

 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
159
7.3 
FAUNA 
7.3.1 
Overview 
This section addresses vertebrate, short range endemic and subterranean fauna separately. 
7.3.1.1 
Vertebrate Fauna 
The existing  environment section  (Section 5.2.2) contains further details on fauna within the Study 
Area. 
The following vertebrate fauna were recorded in the Study Area: 
• 
20 mammal species; 
• 
125 bird species; 
• 
82 reptile species; 
• 
5 amphibian species; and 
• 
11 introduced species. 
A total of 13 conservation significant species were recorded (or evidence was recorded) within the 
Study Area, including four EPBC listed species, five species protected under the WC Act, and seven 
Priority species (note: some of these overlap). 
A further eight conservation significant species were considered to have a high or medium likelihood 
of occurrence in the area although they were not recorded in surveys. 
Throughout  the  pastoral  area  the  fauna  habitat  is  continuous  with  low  levels  of  disturbance.    This 
means  that  fauna  habitat  within  the  pastoral  area  is  well  represented  within  the  region.    In  the 
freehold area, the fauna habitat associated with remnant native vegetation is highly fragmented.   
7.3.1.2 
SRE Invertebrate Fauna 
Determined or possible SRE species within the Study Area 
Two confirmed and four to six possible SRE species were found within the Study Area.  
Potential  SRE habitat for the species listed above are described in Table 7‐10.   The location of SRE 
habitat in relation to the Proposal is shown in Figure 5‐27 to Figure 5‐29 
Table 7‐10  SRE species and potential SRE species 
Species 
SRE status 
Habitat types 
MYG018 (mygalomorph spider) 
confirmed 
Mh15 
MYG045 (mygalomorph spider) 
confirmed 
Mp12 
Kwonkan sp. (mygalomorph spider) 
Possible 
Mp15 
Teyl sp. (mygalomorph spider) 
Possible 
Yp2 
Austrohorus sp. (pseudoscorpion)* 
Possible 
Gf2, Gy1, and Mp6 
Beierolpium sp. (pseudoscorpion)* 
possible 
Gf2, Gy1, Mh11, Mh15, Mp4, Mp5, Mp6, Yc2 and Yp2 
*
Note: the pseudoscorpions may represent up to 4 morphospecies
 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
160
7.3.1.3 
Subterranean Invertebrate Fauna 
Stygofauna 
Stygofauna have been recorded from 16 of the 30 land systems in the Study Area, although none of 
these records were taken within the Study Area. Stygofauna have been found in three soil landscape 
systems, Tamala (4 records), Dartmoor and Northampton (1 record each). 
Given  the  wide  occurrence  of  stygofauna  records  throughout  the  region  it  is  likely  that  other  land 
systems and soil landscape systems within the Study Area may also contain stygofauna. 
Troglofauna 
Three  land  systems  of  the  Study  Area  have  records  of  troglofauna  (Mileura,  Cunya  and  Weld,  and 
Tallering).  Two soil landscape systems of the Study Area have records of troglofauna (Dartmoor and 
Tamala).  
Based on experience in recent years within the Pilbara where troglofauna are now being found to be 
quite  widespread,  it  is  likely  that  the  majority  of  the  land  and  soil  landscape  systems  in  the  Study 
Area will support troglofauna.  
7.3.2 
Key statutory requirements, environmental policy and guidance 
7.3.2.1 
EPA Objective 
The  EPA  objective  for  management  of  terrestrial  fauna  is  to  maintain  the  abundance,  diversity, 
geographic  distribution  and  productivity  of  fauna  at  species  and  ecosystem  level  through  the 
avoidance or management of adverse impacts and improvement in knowledge. 
7.3.2.2 
EPA statements and guidelines 
The  following  EPA  statements  are  relevant  to  fauna  in  relation  to  the  Proposal,  with  Position 
Statement  No.3  and  Guidance  Statement  No.  56  considered  the  most  relevant,  and  discussed  in 
more detail below. 
 
EPA Position Statement No. 3 ‐ Terrestrial Biological Surveys as an Element of Biodiversity 
Protection (EPA, 2002); 
 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 20 ‐ Sampling of Short Range Endemic Invertebrate Fauna for 
Environmental Impact Assessment in Western Australia (EPA, 2005); 
 
EPA  Guidance Statement  No. 33  ‐  Environmental  Guidance for Planning and  Development 
(EPA, 2005); 
 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 54 ‐ Consideration of Subterranean Fauna in Groundwater and 
Caves during Environmental Impact Assessment in Western Australia (EPA, 2004); 
 
EPA Draft Guidance Statement No. 54a ‐ Sampling Methods and Survey Considerations for 
Subterranean Fauna in Western Australia (EPA, 2007); and 
 
EPA  Guidance  Statement  No.  56  ‐  Terrestrial  Fauna  Surveys  for  Environmental  Impact 
Assessment in Western Australia (EPA, 2004). 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 56 
As  described  in  the  EPA  Position  Statement  No.  3,  the  EPA  determined  that  a  series  of  guidance 
statements were warranted to provide an easy‐to‐use decision‐making guide to the level of biological 
survey  required.    EPA  Guidance  Statement  No.  56  “Terrestrial  Fauna  Surveys  for  Environmental 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
161
Impact Assessment in Western Australia” (EPA 2003a), provides guidance on standards and protocols 
for terrestrial fauna surveys, particularly those undertaken for the environmental impact assessment 
of proposals. 
7.3.2.3 
Applicable Legislation and Policy 
The preservation and conservation of fauna is covered primarily by the following legislation: 
 
EP Act (WA); 
 
WC Act (WA); 
 
EPBC Act (Commonwealth); and 
 
Conservation and Land Management Act 1984 (WA). 
In  WA,  rare  or  endangered  species  are  protected  by  the  Wildlife  Conservation  (Specially  Protected 
Fauna)  Notice  2005,  under  the  WC  Act.    Schedules  1  and  4  in  this  notice  are  relevant  to  this 
assessment, providing a listing of those species protected by this Notice.   
The WA DEC Priority Fauna List also nominates conservation species, from Priority level 1 to 4.  The 
list includes species that are not considered Threatened under the WC Actbut are still considered in 
need of protection.  Although the Priority Fauna List does not confer any additional legal protection it 
is  expected  that  potential  impacts  from  a  proposal  on  these  Priority  listed  species  should  be 
managed so that the species do not meet the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and 
Natural Resources (IUCN) criteria for threatened species (see below).   
The Commonwealth EPBC Act protects species listed under Schedule 1 of the Act.  In 1974, Australia 
signed the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.  As a 
result,  an  official  list  of  endangered  species  was  prepared  and  is  regularly  updated.    This  listing  is 
administered through the Commonwealth EPBC Act.  The current list differs from the various State 
lists but there are some species that are common to both. The EPBC Act utilises ‘significance levels’ 
for fauna, which are recommended by the IUCN.   
The  EPBC  Act  lists  migratory  species  that  are  recognised  under  international  treaties  such  as  the 
China  Australia  Migratory  Bird  Agreement  (CAMBA),  the  Japan  Australia  Migratory  Bird  Agreement 
(JAMBA)  and  the  Bonn  Convention  (Convention  on  the  Conservation  of  Migratory  Species  of  Wild 
Animals).  
7.3.3 
Aspects and Impacts 
Aspects  with  the  potential  to  impact  vertebrate  fauna  and  SREs  in  the  Proposal  Area  have  been 
identified as: 
 
vegetation clearing; 
 
dust emissions; 
 
noise, light, vibration; 
 
vehicle, machinery activity; 
 
Proposal infrastructure; and 
 
development of quarries and borrow pits. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
162
Aspects with the potential to impact stygofauna include: 
 
groundwater pollution; 
 
reduced infiltration/recharge of the underlying aquifer(s) due to surface sealing, resulting in 
a reduction or loss of the available stygofauna habitat; and 
 
development of quarries and borrow pits. 
Aspects with the potential to impact troglofauna include development of quarries and borrow pits. 
The primary impact on fauna as is expected to be related to clearing of habitat.  Habitat clearing and 
other  disturbance  from  the  aspects  listed  above  has  the  potential  to  impact  fauna  directly  and 
indirectly,  and  may  result  in  changes  to  fauna  numbers,  health,  assemblages,  population  dynamics 
and  ecological  function.    Proposal  infrastructure  may  act  as  a  barrier  to  the  dispersal  of  terrestrial 
mammals and reptiles.  Noise, vibration and lightspill may cause fauna to move out of areas adjacent 
to the rail line.  An increase in the potential for weeds and fire may also have impacts on fauna and 
fauna habitat. 
7.3.4 
Fauna Impact Assessment 
7.3.4.1 
Vertebrate Fauna  
Impacts on Biodiversity 
Due to the mostly linear nature of the habitat disturbance the diversity of fauna assemblages within 
the  region  are  unlikely  to  be  significantly  affected  by  the  Proposal.    Most  terrestrial  fauna  are 
expected to be able to move to adjacent areas of suitable habitat.   
Ultimately,  biodiversity  and  ecological  function  are  expected  to  recover  to  a  large  extent  as 
vegetation communities regenerate in rehabilitated areas and stabilise, allowing native fauna to re‐
colonise from adjacent areas.  However, adequate weed management, including regular monitoring 
for  exotic  weeds,  is  important  for  revegetation  to  succeed  in  re‐creating  as  close  as  possible  the 
original fauna habitats disturbed by the Proposal.   
Those  vegetation  types  that  take  the  longest  to  fully  regenerate  are  the  ones  containing  mature 
eucalypts with hollows.  In the Proposal Area these occur primarily along the larger creeklines, which 
will only have a small area impacted by the Rail Corridor.  In these locations proposed management 
strategies will ensure that creekline disturbance is restricted to the immediate area of the bridge or 
culvert structures. 
Granite  outcrop  habitat  suitable  for  Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink  (Egernia  stokesii  badia)  cannot  be 
replaced.  OPR has therefore designed the Proposal to avoid this habitat, thus avoiding direct impacts 
to this species. 
Impacts to Fauna Habitat Types 
The  most  significant  potential  impact  identified  is  the  direct  impart  of  clearing  of  habitat  for 
construction  of  the  Rail  Corridor.    Most  of  the  disturbance  of  native  vegetation  (5900  ha)  is  in  the 
pastoral area.  The freehold land area contains fragmented fauna habitats whereas habitat types in 
the pastoral land area are generally more widespread. Table 7‐11 summarises the characteristics of 
each habitat type and the potential impact of the Proposal. 
Indirect  impacts  on  fauna  habitat  may  also  occur  within  and  immediately  adjacent  to  the  Rail 
Corridor and ancillary features from interference with local drainage patterns. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
163
Table 7‐11  Impact to fauna habitat types within the Proposal Area 
Area 
Habitat type 
Potential impact 
Freehold Woodland 
with 
heath 
Clearing of native vegetation through the freehold area has been avoided where possible 
through the design phase.  Clearing of fauna habitat will be required for some portions of the 
Rail Corridor where avoidance is not practicable; however this is expected to be less than 100 
ha within approximately 180 km of the western portion of the Proposal Area.   Due to the small 
nature of this clearing the Proposal is not expected to have a significant impact on fauna 
populations within the freehold area. 
Sandy eucalypt 
woodland 
Pastoral Mulga 
woodland 
Occurs adjacent to and is likely to extend well beyond the Proposal Area. Consequently the 
Proposal is unlikely to significantly impact fauna that occur in this habitat.   
Sandy or stony 
plains 
Occurs adjacent to and likely to extend well beyond the Proposal Area. Consequently the 
Proposal is unlikely to significantly impact fauna that occur in this habitat. 
Halophyte 
vegetation 
A significant portion of this habitat type is located to the north of Weld range and the Proposal 
will only impact on a small portion of a much larger area of this habitat that extends beyond the 
Proposal Area.  Although disconnected this habitat type is expected to occur beyond the 
Proposal Area in low lying damp areas within the surrounding landscape. Nevertheless, OPR 
will ensure that impacts to this habitat type are minimised as much as practicable.  This will 
ensure that impacts to the Slender-billed Thornbill (EPBC Act Vulnerable), a specialist of this 
habitat type, are also minimised.  
River 
Vegetation 
The Rail Corridor construction corridor widths will be reduced as much as practicable within 
proximity to watercourses and will be perpendicular to flow, which will ensure that significant 
impacts to this vegetation type are unlikely.  
Mixed wattle 
scrub 
This habitat type is extensively represented beyond the Proposal Area in the surrounding 
region.  Consequently the Proposal is unlikely to significantly impact fauna that occur in this 
habitat. 
Mulga 
shrubland  
This habitat type is extensively represented beyond the Proposal Area in the surrounding 
region.  Consequently the Proposal is unlikely to significantly impact fauna that occur in this 
habitat. 
Conservation Significant Vertebrate Fauna  
Of the 21 conservation significant fauna that occur or are likely to occur in the Proposal Area, a low 
likelihood of regional impacts from the Proposal was predicted for 14 species, based on factors such 
as preferred habitat, distribution of species, and use of Proposal Area (see Appendix 2).   DEWHA will 
assess three of these species as Matters of National Environmental Significance; Malleefowl, Western 
Spiny‐tailed Skink and Slender‐billed Thornbill.  DEWHA will receive advice from the EPA as part of 
this  assessment.      A  more  detailed  assessment  of  these  species  can  be  found  in  Chapter  8.    The 
remainder of conservation significant species will be assessed at the State level. 
Five conservation species are identified as being potentially impacted by the Proposal: 
 
Crested Bellbird (Oreioca gutturalis) (southern subspecies) DEC Priority 4; 
 
Rufous Fieldwren (Calamanthus campestris) (western subspecies) DEC Priority 4; 
 
Western Spiny‐tailed Skink (Egernia stokesii badia) (Black form) EPBC Act endangered, WC 
Act schedule 1; 
 
Yuna Broad‐blazed slider (Lerista yuna) WC act schedule 4; and 
 
Lerista eupoda (no common name) DEC Priority 1. 
The Western Spiny‐tailed skink is also discussed in Section 8 as a Matter of NES. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
164
Crested Bellbird (southern subspecies) 
The  distribution  of  the  southern  subspecies  has  been  contracting  largely  due  to  habitat 
fragmentation through clearing.  The Crested Bellbird (southern subspecies) inhabits the shrub‐layer 
of  eucalypt  woodland,  mallee,  acacia  shrubland,  triodia  hummock  grassland,  saltbush  and  heath, 
where they feed on a variety of insects and seeds. 
Based  on  this  subspecies’  distribution  it  has  potential  to  be  present  in  the  westernmost  portion  of 
the  Proposal  Area.  This  also  represents  the  northernmost  portion  of  the  subspecies’  distribution.  
Given the already fragmented nature of the habitat in the freehold land area, further fragmentation 
has the potential to have an impact. 
Indirect impacts to the species could occur through possible increases in the frequency of fires and 
potential increases in feral animal activity. 
Within the freehold area habitat for this species has mostly been avoided as part of the design phase 
of the Proposal.  The clearing required through the freehold area includes only a small percentage of 
the remaining habitat for this species.   On this basis, the regional population is not expected to be 
significantly impacted. 
Indirect impacts to the species are expected to be managed by controlling the likelihood of increases 
in feral animal activity and the frequency of fires. 
Rufous Fieldwren (western subspecies) 
The western subspecies of the Rufous Fieldwren is endemic to the south‐west of the WA wheatbelt 
and  in  lower  densities,  in  some  coastal  heathlands.  The  distribution  of  the  subspecies  has  been 
contracting largely due to habitat fragmentation in the wheatbelt.
  
The  Rufous  Fieldwren  was  recorded  in  the  Proposal  Area  from  two  habitat  types  including  low 
eucalypt  mallee  over  moderately  dense  sedges  and  shrubs  and  open  eucalypt  woodland  over 
moderately  dense  shrubs  and  sedges.    Other  suitable  habitat  was  noted,  particularly  the  heath 
associated with the Moresby Range and areas of halophytic vegetation surveyed.  The heath habitat 
of  the  Moresby  Range  is  likely  to  represent  some  of  the  best  coastal  habitat  available  within  the 
subspecies’ distribution.    
Within the freehold area habitat for this species has mostly been avoided as part of the design phase 
of the Proposal.   The Proposal has been designed to avoid remnant vegetation within the proposed 
Moresby Range conservation reserve. 
 Small impacts on preferred habitat may result in a minor impact on the subspecies, if present.   At a 
regional level population is not expected to be significantly impacted. 
Indirect impacts to the species are expected to be managed by controlling the likelihood of increases 
in feral animal activity and the frequency of fires. 
Western Spiny‐tailed Skink 
Surveys  by  Ecologia  (2009)  of  alternate  proposed  Rail  Corridors  that  are  described  within  this  PER, 
and a recent regional survey have substantially increased the known distribution and population of 
this  species,  with  over  50  new  populations  identified  outside  of  the  Proposal  Area.    These  new 
populations  have  been  clustered  around  emergent  granite  formations  ranging  in  size  from  hills  to 
low rises. 
The Western Spiny‐tailed Skink has a patchy distribution throughout the dry to semiarid habitats of 
WA and has recently declined across much of the central wheatbelt (Storr et al. 1999; How et al. 
2003). However, the skinks observed within and surrounding the Proposal Area are a melanic (black) 
form, previously only known from a handful of locations including Woolgorong Rock and 4 km east of 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
165
Yalgoo. This subpopulation occurs only on granite outcrops and may represent a regionally distinct 
form (How et al. 2003) or potentially a new species (Hamilton 2003). 
A  total  of  12  individual  populations  of  Western  Spiny‐Tailed  Skinks  (black  form)  were  found 
inhabiting granite outcrops within  the Proposal Area to the southwest of  Weld Range,  sheltered in 
the horizontal rock crevices that had formed in these landforms.  Granite outcrop habitat suitable for 
Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink  (Egernia  stokesii  badia)  cannot  be  replaced.    On  this  basis,  OPR  has 
designed the Proposal to avoid the majority of Western Spiny‐tailed Skink habitat.   
For all but two of the twelve populations the rail line has been deviated to provide a 200 m buffer 
zone between populations and the rail line.  While the two remaining populations will potentially be 
bisected by the rail line, a buffer of 50 to 60 m will be maintained so that no granite outcrops will be 
directly  impacted.    For  the  remaining  ten  populations  within  the  Proposal  Area,  the  rail  will  be 
located  more  than  200  m  from  known  granite  outcrop  habitat.    The  remaining  known  populations 
are located outside of the Proposal Area (refer to Section 8). 
Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skinks  live  in  colonies  predominantly  within  the  same  rocky  outcrop  and 
movement between outcrops is thought to be low.  Evidence of low dispersal rates has been found 
from genetic analysis and recapture studies populations (Gardner et al. 2001; Gardner et al. 2007).  
Studies  in  E.  cunninghami,  a  species  closely  related  to  E.  stokesii  and  showing  a  similar  life  history 
strategy,  found  that  92%  of  individuals  had  moved  less  than  11  m  when  recaptured  (Stow  and 
Sunnucks 2004).  A low dispersal rate may be expected based on the patchy nature of the black E. 
Stokesii badia’s preferred habitat; rocky outcrops often separated from each other by large expanses 
of flat, often sparsely vegetated land.  
Indirect impacts to the species are also expected to be low due to the low dispersal rate and limited 
movement  of  individuals.    A  minimum  50‐60  m  buffer  zone  is  considered  sufficiently  protective  to 
ensure  known  populations  and  individuals  are  not  impacted.    While  limited  movement  between 
outcrops  is  anticipated,  fauna  passages  will  be  established  below  the  rail  line  to  allow  for  any 
movement.  Skinks have been observed climbing and jumping between rocks when moving between 
crevices within an outcrop and are therefore considered also to be capable of crossing train tracks 
(Ecologia, 2010).  While up to 18 train movements are predicted each day, and this may  present  a 
strike risk, noise and vibration from approaching trains will be a likely deterrent at these times.    
All borrow areas will be located outside of the 200 m buffer area for these species which will ensure 
habitat  is  not  impacted.  200  m  was  considered  to  be  a  suitable  buffer  as  the  skinks  are 
predominantly sedentary and confined to discrete granite outcrop habitats (Appendix 2). This buffer 
was recommended by fauna specialists (Ecologia, 2010). 
Although  it  is  thought  that  the  skinks  can  move  up  to  500  m  (based  on  genetic  studies),  this  is 
thought to be rare.  The maximum distance an individual Western Spiny‐tailed Skink has been known 
to travel is 350 m from its original location (Ecologia 2010). 
Furthermore,  this  species  is  considered  likely  to  colonise  areas  of  disturbance  associated  with  rock 
quarries if suitable crevices are created (Ecologia 2010b). It is therefore anticipated that there may 
be a potential increase in suitable habitat for this species as a result of the Proposal’s ballast quarry 
developments. 
Other  indirect  impacts  to  the  species  are  expected  to  be  managed  by  controlling  the  likelihood  of 
increases in feral animal activity and the frequency of fires. 
On  the  basis  of  the  above  information,  the  Proposal  is  considered  unlikely  to  significantly  impact 
upon the population dynamics of this species. 
Additional information on this species in included in Section 8.2.2.2. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
166
Yuna Broad‐blazed slider  
Yuna Broad‐blazed slider is a moderately small, slender skink which is found in pale sand plains in the 
vicinity of Yuna in semi‐arid lower western interior where it shelters in soft soil under leaf litter at the 
bases of shrubs.   Yuna Broad‐blazed slider has a restricted range of approximately 100 km long by 30 
km wide, in the area surrounding Yuna station, east of Yuna.  
The Proposal Area occurs in the southern range of distribution of Yuna Broad‐blazed slider.  Twelve 
individuals of this species were recorded from three locations during the OPR–F survey.  The species 
has  a  limited  distribution,  so  there  is  the  potential  for  a  moderate  impact  to  this  species.    Indirect 
impacts to the species are expected to be managed by controlling the likelihood of increases in feral 
animal activity and the frequency of fires. 
Due to the narrow nature of the Proposal and the limited percentage loss of habitat (<0.5%), regional 
populations of this species are not expected to be significantly impacted. 
Lerista eupoda 
Lerista  eupoda  is  a  moderately  large  skink  species,  which  is  confined  to  the  arid  interior  of  WA 
around  Weld  Range  and  between  Meekatharra  and  Cue,  where  it  inhabits  open  mulga  areas  on 
loamy soils. The species was only described in 1996 (Smith 1996) and relatively little is known about 
the ecology of this species. 
Approximately 3.7% of the known population range for this species occurs within the Proposal Area.  
This  species  has  a  limited  distribution,  occurring  in  mulga  and  acacia  woodland  on  the  plains 
surrounding Weld Range. 
Within the Proposal Area, two records of the Lerista eupoda came from the OPR‐WR survey, while 
three individuals were recorded from two sites during the Level 1 survey of the Weld Rail Spur and 
another individual was recorded from site W7 of the previous alignments. Records from the previous 
alignments  and  other  regional  records  all  place  L.  eupoda  within  approximately  50  km  of  Weld 
Range. 
The Proposal has been located to mostly avoid habitat associated with this species which is located 
on  the  slopes  of  hills  within  the  Weld  Range.      Indirect  impacts  to  the  species  are  expected  to  be 
managed by controlling the likelihood of increases in feral animal activity and the frequency of fires. 
Due to the narrow nature of the Proposal and the limited loss of habitat, regional populations of this 
species are not expected to be significantly impacted. 
1   ...   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə