Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə26/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   ...   41

7.5 
SURFACE HYDROLOGY 
7.5.1 
Overview 
The Proposal Area lies principally within the catchments of the Chapman, Greenough and Murchison 
Rivers.  The Proposal follows the Greenough River for most of its length, utilising the relatively even 
gradient associated with its valleys.  
Most of the creeks and rivers within the Proposal Area (including nine that will require a bridge) are 
episodic and major flows are the result of cyclone and major storm events. The Proposal Area does 
not contain any wetlands of significance. 
The  Proposal  Area  intersects  one  RIWI  Act  Surface  Water  Management  Area;  the  Greenough  River 
and Tributaries. 
Significant  surface  hydrology  characteristics  of  the  Proposal  Area  include  the  Greenough  River  and 
tributaries, sheetflow in areas of sheetflow dependant vegetation  (such as  Mulga) and stormwater 
drainage of major drainage channels (Figure 5‐31). 
The surface drainage of the Proposal Area is described in detail in Section 5.2.3. 
7.5.2 
Key statutory requirements, environmental policy and guidance 
7.5.2.1 
EPA Objectives 
The EPA objectives for management of potential impacts to surface water are: 
 
to  maintain  the  quantity  of  water  so  that  existing  and  potential  environmental  values, 
including ecosystem maintenance, are protected; 
 
to  ensure  that  emissions  do  not  adversely  affect  environmental  values  or  the  health, 
welfare  and  amenity  of  people  and  land  uses  by  meeting  statutory  requirements  and 
acceptable standards; and 
 
to maintain the integrity, ecological functions and environmental values of wetlands. 
7.5.2.2 
EPA statements and guidelines 
EPA Guidance No. 33 ‐ Environmental Guidance for Planning and Development (EPA, 2005) provides 
guidance on surface water impacts and management in Western Australia. 
7.5.2.3 
Applicable Legislation and Policy 
The  EP  Act  is  the  principal  statute  relevant  to  environmental  protection  in  WA.    The  Act  makes 
provision for prevention, control and abatement of pollution and for the conservation, preservation, 
protection, enhancement and management of the environment.   
Surface  water  discharges  and  potentially  polluting  activities  affecting  surface  water  are  managed 
under work approvals and environmental licences issued to prevent environmental harm or pollution 
under Part V of the EP Act. 
Other applicable guidelines and policies for surface water are the Australian New Zealand Guidelines 
for  Fresh  and  Marine  Water  Quality  (ANZECC/  ARMCANZ,  2000),  and  the  Environmental  Water 
Provisions for WA; Statewide Policy No. 5 (WRC, 2000). 
While  the  EP Act is the primary environmental legislation, the  RIWI Act also  provides regulation of 
activities associated with surface and groundwater aspects of the Proposal.  Licences issued by DoW 
under  the  RIWI  Act  for  the  interference  of  Bed  and  Banks  of  surface  water  resource  within  the 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
175
Proposal Area will be required for the proposed river crossings which fall within the Greenough River 
and Tributaries Surface Water Management Area.  
ANZECC/ARMCANZ Guidelines 
In 1996 the Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) together 
with the Agricultural and Resource Management Council of Australia and New Zealand (ARMCANZ) 
developed the National Principles for the Provision of Water for Ecosystems (1996).  These national 
principles  aimed  to  improve  the  approach  to  water  resource  allocation  and  management,  and  to 
incorporate the needs of the environment in the water allocation process.  The overriding goal of the 
principles is to provide water for the environment to sustain, and where necessary restore, ecological 
processes and biodiversity of water dependent ecosystems. 
ANZECC  and  ARMCANZ  have  also  released  a  set  of  water  quality  guidelines  for  the  protection  of 
marine  and  freshwater  ecosystems  (ANZECC/ARMCANZ  2000).    The  ANZECC/ARMCANZ  guidelines 
provide  a  comprehensive  list  of  recommended  low‐risk  trigger  values  for  physical  and  chemical 
stressors  in  water  bodies,  broken  down  into  five  geographical  regions  across  Australia  and  New 
Zealand.  
State Policy on Environmental Water Provisions 
In  WA,  the  Statewide  Policy  on  Environmental  Water  Provisions  (WRC  2000)  protects  ground  and 
surface  water  dependent  ecosystem  values  through  the  establishment  of  ecological  water 
requirements.    The  policy  was  guided  by  State  water  and  environmental  legislation,  the  National 
Strategy  on  Ecologically  Sustainable  Development  and  the  National  Principles  for  the  Provision  of 
Water for Ecosystems (ANZECC/ARMCANZ 1996).   
Ecological  water  requirements  are  determined  on  the  basis  of  the  best  scientific  information 
available.    A  conservative  approach  is  taken  to  the  estimation  of  ecological  water  requirements  in 
allocation planning and licensing processes where scientific knowledge of ecosystem requirements is 
limited.  Soil water requirements are elements of the existing or historic water flow regime that are 
required to sustain key social values such as recreation and Aboriginal heritage and culture. 
 
Australian  New  Zealand  Guidelines  for  Fresh  and  Marine  Water  Quality  (ANZECC/ 
ARMCANZ, 2000); 
 
State  Water  Quality  Management  Strategy  No.  1  Framework  for  Implementation  (WA 
Government, 2001); 
 
Environmental Water Provisions for WA; Statewide Policy No. 5 (WRC, 2000); and 
 
EPA Guidance No. 33 ‐ Environmental Guidance for Planning and Development (EPA, 2008). 
7.5.3 
Aspects and Impacts 
The  main  aspect  of  the  proposal  with  the  potential  to  impact  surface  water  hydrology  is  the  Rail 
Corridor itself, and the linear nature of the infrastructure.  Other aspects include vegetation clearing 
and the use and storage of hydrocarbons. 
Potential impacts to surface hydrology include: 
 
interruption to existing surface water flow patterns, including sheet flow; 
 
erosion and sedimentation; and 
 
contamination of surface waters. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
176
7.5.4 
Surface Hydrology Impact Assessment 
Route planning for the Proposal has considered surface hydrology as a critical factor.  Placing of long 
life  infrastructure  within  significant  flood  areas  is  avoided  for  cost  and  risk  reasons,  leading  to  a 
reduction in the potential impacts to surface hydrology. 
The  Proposal  will  unavoidably  require  the  construction  of  approximately  nine  bridges  over 
waterways  and  a  number  of  culverts  along  the  alignment.    There  may  be  increased  stream  bed  or 
bank erosion near these  drainage  crossings.   Details of bridges  and  culverts  have been provided in 
Sections 4.4.4.1 and 4.4.4.2 respectively. 
Pooling  upstream  of  Proposal  infrastructure  is  unlikely  to  occur  during  significant  rainfall  events  as 
bridges  or  culverts  will  be  installed  at  all  drainage  lines.    In  extreme  rainfall  events  there  may  be 
some  pooling  however  these  events  are  expected  to  coincide  with  flooding  of  most  drainage  lines 
within  the  region.    The  installation  of  culverts  and  bridges  will  also  ensure  downstream  hydraulic 
capacity  is  maintained.    The  creation  of  minor,  localised  ponding  areas  may  provide  additional  soil 
water  to  promote  plant  growth.    While  this  may  create  local  impacts  on  vegetation  and  stock 
carrying capacity, these events will be episodic and small in scale. 
Bridges  will  generally  be  designed  such  that  they  are  perpendicular  to  the  watercourse.    This  will 
reduce  the  likelihood  of  stream  diversions.    Culverts  will  be  aligned  in  the  same  direction  as  the 
drainage lines; therefore the likelihood of diversion is reduced. 
DEC will be consulted during the detailed design phase for the Rail Corridor to ensure any impacts on 
conservation vegetation areas are minimised.  The spacing and size of culverts in conservation areas 
would  be  determined  after  a  visual  assessment  of  each  of  these  areas  and  combined  with  the 
outputs of the above sheet flow assessment. 
OPR has generally located the indicative rail alignment to avoid sheetflow areas as much as possible.  
In  some  cases  the  alignment  has  been  relocated  tens  of  km  to  locate  it  on  gently  sloping  ground 
where the drainage features are more incised.  This has occurred within proximity to the Weld Range 
on Jundal Station.   
The preliminary drainage design of the railway makes provision for approximately 650 environmental 
culverts based on CEJV/BGE (unpublished) Summary of Bridge and Drainage Design Studies for OPR 
rail (see Appendix 3), however this figure is a preliminary  estimate only.  
It is nominally proposed to install environmental culverts between larger engineered culverts, so that 
the spacing between consecutive culverts does not exceed 400 m. However, where there are run‐off 
dependant  ecosystems  downstream  of  culverts  consideration  will  be  given  to  water  distribution  to 
ensure that water drainage shadows do not result outside of the original construction footprint.  It is 
expected that spacings as low as 50 m may be required in some locations. 
Figure 7‐1 demonstrates the indicative design for sheetflow drainage mechanisms and the expected 
drainage  shadow.    The  drainage  shadow  was  calculated  using  a  45°  angle  for  the  expected  flow 
direction of the sheetflow once it exits the culverts.  To achieve this angle the flow will need to be 
spread using various spreader mechanisms, which OPR will install at each culvert. 
Significant  rainfall  events  during  construction  are  likely  to  cause  short‐term  localised  erosion  and 
potential  increases  in  sediment  loads.    Within  a  regional  context  this  erosion  or  any  subsequent 
impacts on surface water is not expected to be significant. 
All waterway crossings will be implemented in accordance with the specific conditions set in ‘Bed and 
Banks’ Permits to be issued by DoW under  the RIWI Act.   Compliance with  DoW requirements will 
ensure that surface water hydrology is not significantly impacted. 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
177
 
Figure 7‐1  Sheetflow drainage culvert design 
During  construction  there  is  the  risk  of  surface  water  contamination  from  hydrocarbon  or  other 
spills. Compliance with the Hazardous Materials & Contamination Management Plan will ensure that 
surface hydrology is not significantly impacted.  
Detailed  consultation  with  landholders  to  assist  in  the  design  of  rail  and  road  drainage  design  will 
ensure that any potential impacts on farm and pastoral productivity is not significantly impacted due 
to altered drainage conditions.   
7.5.5 
Proposed Mitigation and Management Measures 
7.5.5.1 
Performance Management 
OPR has developed environmental management objectives, targets and performance indicators for 
surface hydrology (Table 7‐17). 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
178
Table 7‐17  Surface water management objectives, targets and performance indicators 
OPR Management Objective 
Target 
Performance Indicators 
To avoid any significant 
disturbance to surface water 
hydrology regimes and ensure 
the protection of riparian 
vegetation. 
  All RIWI Act permits obtained for named streams, 
water courses and embankments requiring 
disturbance  
  No visible pooling upstream of Project 
infrastructure 
  No visible diversion or restriction of flow 
downstream of Project infrastructure 
  No vegetation loss outside of approved 
disturbance footprint through alteration to surface 
water hydrology. 
  No significant scouring or erosion on downstream 
waterways. 
 
Compliance with Bed and 
Banks Permits. 
 
Visual surface water hydrology 
observations during flow events 
 
Riparian vegetation monitoring 
downstream of the Proposal 
 Incident 
reporting 
Ensure the protection of 
sheetflow dependent 
vegetation. 
  No visible restriction of flow downstream of Project 
infrastructure 
  No vegetation loss outside of approved 
disturbance footprint through alteration to surface 
water hydrology. 
 
Visual surface water hydrology 
observations during flow events 
 
Mulga vegetation monitoring in 
sheetflow areas 
 Incident 
reporting 
To maintain the quality of 
surface water and minimise 
the potential for erosion and 
sedimentation. 
  No significant increase in sedimentation 
downstream of Proposal infrastructure. 
  No significant decline in water quality downstream 
of Proposal infrastructure. 
 
Water quality monitoring data. 
 Incident 
reporting 
 Compliance 
with 
Hazardous 
Materials and Contamination 
Management Plan 
7.5.5.2 
Management Strategies 
To maintain the sheetflow regime in sensitive vegetation areas the Proposal will include a significant 
number  of  ‘environmental’  culverts  to  ensure  that  sheetflow  dependant  vegetation  such  as  some 
areas  of  Mulga  are  not  significantly  impacted.      There  will  be  some  drainage  shadow  effects  in 
sheetflow areas, however the drainage shadow is expected to remain within the initial construction 
disturbance envelope and therefore will not result in any significant additional impacts to vegetation. 
In  this  regard  OPR  will  complete  further  detailed  assessments  of  the  corridor  to  identify  sheetflow 
dependant vegetation.  In these locations OPR will incorporate culverts at an appropriate spacing to 
restrict sheetflow impacts to within the original construction footprint. 
DEC will be consulted during the detailed design phase for the Rail Corridor to ensure any impacts on 
conservation vegetation areas are minimised.  The spacing and size of culverts in conservation areas 
would  be  determined  after  a  visual  assessment  of  each  of  these  areas  and  combined  with  the 
outputs of the above sheetflow assessment. 
OPR  will  undertake  detailed  consultation  with  landholders  to  assist  in  the  design  of  rail  and  road 
drainage design, land access arrangements and land management measures.  
Proposed management of surface hydrology is summarised in Table 7‐18. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
179
Table 7‐18  Proposed surface hydrology management strategies 
Management Strategies 
Relevant EMP  Phase 
Responsible 
Persons 
Prepare and implement a Surface Water Management Plan (SWMP) to 
contain the following actions: 
  water from wash down bays will be collected, treated and  released 
or recycled where possible; 
  identify relevant surface water monitoring points schedules and 
frequencies, together with trigger levels and responses for 
implementation of investigations and corrective actions where 
appropriate; 
  contain, monitor and appropriately treat (if required) any potentially 
contaminated stormwater prior to reuse or release to the 
environment; and 
  maintain all stormwater infrastructure to their designed capacity or 
function. 
The SWMP will be developed in consultation with DoW. 
SWMP 
Design, 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction 
Manager, 
Operations 
Manager 
OPR will perform further detailed investigations to refine the current 
understanding of areas of sheetflow dependant vegetation that may be 
impacted by the Proposal.  A hydrology assessment will be performed for 
these areas to determine the suitable drainage measures required to 
maintain sheetflow and restrict drainage shadows to within the area 
originally disturbed by the construction footprint. 
SWMP 
Design & 
Construction 
Project 
Engineer, 
Environment 
Manager 
Beds and Banks permits will be sought for activities which have the 
potential to interfere with named streams, water courses and 
embankments are to be obtained prior to construction activities. 
SWMP Construction 
Environment 
Manager 
The basis of design for bridges is to withstand 1 in 100 year average 
recurrence flooding without damage and 1 in 2,000 year average 
recurrence flooding without structural damage. 
SWMP 
Design & 
Construction 
Project 
Engineer 
Design and install culverts, bridges or water crossings at drainage 
crossings, and at those areas of vegetation identified as surface water 
dependent, according to the following commitments: 
  minimise interference to overland flow and maintain sheet flow, and 
reduce the risk of shadow effects; 
  reduce pooling alongside the rail which may attract fauna; 
  includes appropriate erosion protection e.g. rip rap rock protection 
and reno mattresses; 
  where infrastructure may cause drainage to flow parallel to the rail 
formation, place culverts at regular intervals together with small 
interceptor banks to direct runoff and reduce ponding
  where practicable, construct bridges and major crossings at right 
angles to major drainage channels; 
  a risk audit should be completed to ensure these designs are 
appropriate to meet environmental and safety objectives; and 
  monitoring will occur to ensure surface water flows are maintained. 
SWMP 
Design & 
Construction 
Project 
Engineer, 
Construction 
Manager, 
Environment 
Manager 
Suitable drainage mechanisms (such as culverts) will be installed in areas 
of sheetflow dependant vegetation at defined low points. 
SWMP 
Design & 
Construction 
Project 
Engineer 
Locate camps and other supporting rail infrastructure away from creeks 
and waterways and at least 0.5 m above the 100yr ARI flood level for the 
area.  
SWMP 
Design & 
Construction 
Project 
Engineer 
Standard controls for hydrocarbon and waste management to be 
implemented to minimise the risk of spills and contamination. 
Hazardous 
Materials & 
Contamination 
MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Safety 
Manager, 
Construction 
Manager, 
Operations 
Manager 
 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
180
7.5.6 
Predicted Outcome 
After  mitigation  and  management  measures  have  been  applied,  the  Proposal  will  result  in  the 
following outcomes in relation to surface hydrology: 
 
no  significant  impacts  on  surface  hydrology  are  expected  as  bridge  and  culverts  will  be 
designed to maintain surface flows; 
 
minor,  localised  impacts  may  occur  in  some  areas  including  drainage  shadow  effects  in 
sheetflow areas, and localised ponding along drainage lines but will be minimised through 
the  use  of  environmental  culverts.    The  drainage  shadow  is  expected  to  be  within  the 
general  construction  disturbance  envelope  and  therefore  will  not  result  in  any  significant 
indirect impacts to vegetation.  This is discussed further in Section 7.2; 
 
significant  rainfall  events  during  construction  may  cause  short‐term  localised  erosion  but 
risks  will  be  minimised  as  constructions  sediment  controls  will  be  established  as  soon  as 
practicable. Within the regional context, erosion or subsequent impact are not expected to 
be significant;  
 
minimal  risk  of  contamination  of  surface  water  as  standard  hydrocarbon  and  waste 
management controls are implemented; and 
 
impacts  on  farm  and  pastoral  productivity  are  not  expected  to  be  significant  with  the 
implementation of detailed surface water management measures.  
 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
181
7.6 
GROUNDWATER 
7.6.1 
Overview 
The Proposal Area intersects two RIWI Act Groundwater Management Areas; the Gascoyne and East 
Murchison.  The  Proposal  does  not  intersect  any  Public  Drinking  Water  and  Supply  areas.  No 
groundwater dependent vegetation was identified within the Study Area. 
Groundwater  resources  vary  within  the  Proposal  Area.  There  is  generally  a  low  prospectivity  of 
significant aquifers, with greatest potential in those areas closest to the coast. Recent groundwater 
investigations  have  indicated  that  water  quality  along  the  alignment  is  generally  brackish  with 
electrical conductivity ranging from 2.2 mS/cm to 18.7 mS/cm. The water quality within granite and 
dolerite  formations  tends  to  be  neutral  to  alkaline  (pH  7.2  ‐  8.5)  (Aquaterra  2009b;  Appendix  4). 
Groundwater is discussed in detail in Section 5.2.4. 
The  two  primary  uses  of  water  during  the  construction  of  the  rail  line  are  to  consolidate  fill  and 
suppress dust. In addition, the construction program will require the establishment of a number of 
construction  camps,  a  sleeper  factory  and  several  workshops  and  depots  which  will  require  a 
temporary water supply. 
The Proposal includes a pipeline along the length of the Rail Corridor so that water can be pumped 
from  supply  locations  to  where  it  is  required.    OPR  is  also  investigating  the  use  of  water  from 
abandoned or active mines, and if feasible will pump or cart water to the Proposal for use. 
It is anticipated that approximately 200 groundwater bores will be drilled, developed and operated 
as production bores to meet the construction water requirements.  Some bores are expected to be 
retained for use during operation. The Proposal is expected to require 3.5 GL of groundwater over 
the 36 month construction period, and 130 ML/yr during operation. 
The  prospect  of  yields  of  sufficient  volume  for  Proposal  construction  are  considered  moderate  to 
good with the optimal distance between bores being 15 km (Aquaterra, 2009b). 
Groundwater impacts from construction will be short term (maximum 36 months) during which time 
aquifers may be drawn down.  Operational use will be at a low level. 
1   ...   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə