Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə27/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   41

7.6.2 
Key statutory requirements, environmental policy and guidance 
7.6.2.1 
EPA Objectives 
The EPA objectives for management of groundwater are: 
 
to  maintain  the  quantity  of  water  so  that  existing  and  potential  environmental  values, 
including ecosystem maintenance, are protected; and 
 
to  ensure  that  emissions  do  not  adversely  affect  environmental  values  or  the  health, 
welfare  and  amenity  of  people  and  land  uses  by  meeting  statutory  requirements  and 
acceptable standards. 
7.6.2.2 
EPA statements and guidelines 
EPA  Guidance  No.  33  Environmental  Guidance  for  Planning  and  Development  (EPA,  2005)  provides 
guidance for groundwater issues and management. 
 
EPA Guidance No. 33 ‐ Environmental Guidance for Planning and Development (EPA, 2008); 
and 
 
EPA Guidance No. 48 (Draft) ‐ Groundwater Environmental Management Areas (EPA, 1998). 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
182
7.6.2.3 
Applicable Legislation and Policy 
The  RIWI  Act  makes  provision  for  the  regulation,  management,  use  and  protection  of  water 
resources.  The Act provides for the sustainable use and development of water resources to meet the 
needs  of  current  and  future  users,  and  the  protection  of  water‐dependent  ecosystems  and  other 
environmental values, including the regulation of activities detrimental to them. 
The  abstraction  of  groundwater  is  subject  to  licensing  by  the  DoW  under  the  RIWI  Act.    Licences 
specify  the  maximum  abstraction  rate  and  include  conditions  for  monitoring.    Permits  to  interfere 
with  bed  and  banks  of  a  watercourse  are  also  issued  by  the  DoW  under  the  RIWI  Act  to  identify 
issues  that  may  impact  on  watercourses  and  identify/approve  suitable  management  strategies  to 
address these impacts. 
Potentially  polluting  activities  are  managed  under  environmental  harm  and  pollution  control 
provisions of the EP Act and licences are issued under the EP Act.  Stormwater management, surface 
water  discharges  and  potentially  polluting  activities  are  managed  under  an  environmental  licence 
issued under Part V of the EP Act.  Other legislative devices pertinent to the handling and storage of 
potential (hazardous) contaminants such as hydrocarbons: 
 
Dangerous Goods Safety Act 1961 and associated regulations; and 
 
Australian Standard AS 1940‐1993 – The Storage and Handling of Flammable and 
Combustible Liquids. 
Other applicable standards and guidelines include: 
 
Australian  New  Zealand  Guidelines  for  Fresh  and  Marine  Quality  Water  (ANZECC  / 
ARMCANZ, 2000); 
 
State Water Quality Management Strategy; 
 
Environmental  Water  Provisions  for  Western  Australian;  Statewide  Policy  No.  5  (WRC, 
2000); and 
 
Department of Health (Draft) Guidelines for the Use of Recycled Water in WA. 
ANZECC/ARMCANZ 1996 Guidelines 
In 1996 the Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) together 
with the Agricultural and Resource Management Council of Australia and New Zealand (ARMCANZ) 
developed the National Principles for the Provision of Water for Ecosystems (1996).  These national 
principles  aimed  to  improve  the  approach  to  water  resource  allocation  and  management,  and  to 
incorporate the needs of the environment in the water allocation process.  The overriding goal of the 
principles is to provide water for the environment to sustain, and where necessary restore, ecological 
processes and biodiversity of water dependent ecosystems. 
ANZECC  and  ARMCANZ  have  also  released  a  set  of  water  quality  guidelines  for  the  protection  of 
marine  and  freshwater  ecosystems  (ANZECC/ARMCANZ  2000).    The  ANZECC/ARMCANZ  guidelines 
provide  a  comprehensive  list  of  recommended  low‐risk  trigger  values  for  physical  and  chemical 
stressors  in  water  bodies,  broken  down  into  five  geographical  regions  across  Australia  and  New 
Zealand. 
State Water Quality Management Strategy 
The Government of WA developed the State Water Quality Management Strategy in 2001 with the 
objective  “to  achieve  sustainable  use  of  the  Nation’s  water  resources  by  protecting  and  enhancing 
their quality while maintaining economic and social development.”  

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
183
The  State  Water  Quality  Management  Strategy  requires  that  a  Water  Conservation  Plan  will  be 
developed  before  a  water  allocation  licence  is  issued  or  renewed.    The  plan  must  outline  water 
efficiency objectives and timeframes.   
Statewide Policy on Environmental Water Provisions 
Statewide  Policy  No.  5  (2000)  describes  the  principles  and  processes  to  be  applied  in  determining 
how much water should be retained for the environment when allocating and reviewing water use 
rights.    The  primary  objective  of  this  policy  is  to  provide  for  the  protection  of  water‐dependent 
ecosystems  while  allowing  for  the  management  of  water  resources  for  their  sustainable  use  and 
development to meet the needs of current and future users. 
Ecological  water  requirements  are  determined  on  the  basis  of  the  best  scientific  information 
available.    A  conservative  approach  is  taken  to  the  estimation  of  ecological  water  requirements  in 
allocation planning and licensing processes where scientific knowledge of ecosystem requirements is 
limited.  Soil water requirements are elements of the existing or historic water flow regime that are 
required to sustain key social values such as recreation and Aboriginal heritage and culture. 
7.6.3 
Aspects and Impacts 
The  main  aspect  of  the  Proposal  with  the  potential  to  impact  groundwater  is  groundwater 
abstraction.  Other aspects include the storage, transport and disposal of hydrocarbons, waste, and 
other hazardous materials. 
Potential  impacts  on  groundwater  include  reduction  of  groundwater  quantity  through  abstraction, 
and reduction in groundwater quality through pollution of the groundwater if contaminated wastes 
are not suitably controlled.  The affects of drawdown could include impacts on stygofauna and other 
groundwater users.   
Impacts  on  pastoral  water  supply  are  not  expected  from  peak  water  use  during  the  construction 
phase  as  pastoral  water  supplies  are  low  flow  and  generally  based  on  shallow  fresh  lenses.  
Construction  water  bores  will  need  to  yield  significantly  more  water  and  hence  are  likely  to  be 
sourcing water from deeper aquifers.  In the event that a pastoral water supply is clearly impacted by 
construction  water  abstraction,  OPR  will  make  arrangements  directly  with  the  pastoralist  to  make 
sure they still have access to adequate water supplies. 
The Proposal is not expected to have a significant impact on groundwater quality or quantities in the 
area.  Groundwater will either be sourced from numerous bores with small extraction requirements 
or  from  a  smaller  number  of  larger  supply  bores  that  have  been  selected  due  to  the  adequate 
supplies  they  contain.    Groundwater  extraction  will  be  managed  in  accordance  with  DoW 
requirements and licenses issued under the RIWI Act, which will ensure that the groundwater source 
is sustainably managed. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
184
7.6.4 
Proposed Mitigation and Management Measures 
7.6.4.1 
Performance Management 
OPR has developed environmental management objectives, targets and performance indicators for 
groundwater (Table 7‐19). 
Table 7‐19  Groundwater management objectives, targets and performance indicators 
OPR Management Objective 
Target 
Performance Indicators 
To maintain the quantity and quality of groundwater 
so that existing and potential environmental values, 
including ecosystem maintenance, are protected. 
  All appropriate DoW licences are obtained. 
  Compliance with DoW licence conditions. 
Acceptable groundwater 
monitoring results 
(quantity and quality). 
7.6.4.2 
Management Strategies 
OPR  will  undertake  detailed  and  ongoing  consultation  with  landholders  to  include  water  supply 
aspects.  Any impacts on pastoral water supply due to the Proposal will be addressed and rectified by 
OPR.   
OPR has also undertaken a detailed desktop assessment for stygofauna within the Proposal Area and 
all groundwater abstraction will be carried out in accordance with licences issued under the RIWI Act, 
which  will  ensure  the  sustainable  use  of  water  supplies  and  protection  of  stygofauna  and  their 
habitat. 
Management objectives for groundwater have been guided by the Pilbara water in mining guidelines 
(2009) as requested by DoW.  The guidelines will inform the Groundwater Management Plan, with 
considerations  including  water  access,  exploration,  alternative  sources,  abstraction  and  pumping 
rates, water use efficiency, water‐dependent ecosystems and other water dependent values, water 
quality and cumulative impacts. 
The  groundwater  licensing  assessment  process  requires  the  Proponent  to  demonstrate  that  the 
proposed groundwater abstraction will not have a detrimental impact on the environment or existing 
users,  or  if  an  impact  is  likely,  that  effective  mitigating  measures  will  be  implemented  (e.g.  supply 
water to these users, deepen existing wells, etc). 
Water supply investigations 
The  main  focus  of  future  investigations  will  be  to  assess  construction  and  accommodation  camp 
water supply.   
It  is  expected  that  when  it  comes  to  palaeo‐channel  and  calcrete  (alluvial)  investigations  for  water 
supply  borefields,  DoW  will  require  detailed  investigations  to  demonstrate  that  an  adequate  and 
available resource exists, prior to approving licensing applications.  This can include:  
 
geophysical  surveys  and  detailed  drilling  programmes  to  delineate  aquifer  geometry  and 
boundaries; 
 
adequate test pumping durations to demonstrate sustainable pumping rates and areas of 
impact; 
 
water chemistry analysis (which may need to include isotopes) to assess recharge rates to 
the aquifer; 
 
installation of monitoring bores for stygofauna monitoring; 
 
development of a robust conceptual model based on the exploration programme; 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
185
 
numerical modelling to assess potential impacts and extent of impact on existing users and 
the environment (e.g. stygofauna); 
 
proposed monitoring network and management programme; and  
 
mitigation measures and trigger levels. 
Accommodation camp water supply 
It is assumed that groundwater quality will be outside of Australian Drinking Water Standards and as 
such, water will require treatment before use as potable water in the accommodation camps 
It is proposed that camp water supply investigations would include the following tasks: 
 
drilling site selection, following confirmation of camp locations; 
 
site visits to carry out ground‐truthing and ground‐based geophysical surveys; 
 
relevant approvals for drilling investigations; 
 
hydrogeological exploration drilling and test‐pumping at each camp location; 
 
analysis and Reporting, including recommendations for bore infrastructure; and 
 
DoW abstraction licensing applications. 
In order to ensure security of supply, it will be necessary to develop additional ‘standby’ production 
bores at each camp. 
Construction water supply 
Eleven exploration targets located within the Proposal Area are proposed to be investigated in the 
Phase 2 drilling programme.  It is proposed that these exploration targets (refer to Section 5.2.4) be 
drilled  and,  if  successful,  test  pumped,  as  they  fall  within  or  along  the  edges  of  the  three  selected 
groundwater  supply  areas,  and  would  therefore  provide  useful,  preliminary  hydrogeological 
information on these areas.    
It  is  envisaged  that  the  construction  water  supply  investigations  would  include  the  following 
components: 
 
airborne geophysical surveys to assist in delineating aquifer boundaries and drilling target 
selection; 
 
ground‐based gravity geophysical surveys (to be done by others) to assist in  mapping  the 
basement geology and finalise drill sites outside the Rail Corridor; 
 
ground‐truthing site visit(s); 
 
relevant approvals for drilling investigations; 
 
exploration drilling investigations and test pumping within the Rail Corridor (eleven targets 
listed above); 
 
further  exploration drilling and production bore installation (in selected areas outside  the 
corridor); 
 
numerical  modelling  to  assess  potential  impacts  (the  requirement  for  a  numerical  model 
will be assessed during the hydrogeological exploration programme; and 
 
reporting and DoW Licensing applications. 
Proposed management of groundwater is detailed in Table 7‐20. 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
186
Table 7‐20  Proposed groundwater management strategies 
Management Strategies 
Relevant EMP  Phase 
Responsible 
Persons 
Continue to investigate potential water sources for the Proposal in 
consultation with DoW and DEC 
Groundwater 
MP 
Prior to 
Construction 
Environment 
Manager 
Groundwater sources will be investigated and licensed under the RIWI Act 
which will ensure that groundwater abstraction is sustainably managed to 
protect groundwater quantity and quality such that Groundwater 
Dependant Ecosystems, subterranean invertebrate fauna and seasonal 
pools will not be significantly affected. 
Groundwater 
MP 
Construction 
Environment 
Manager 
All bores no longer required will be rehabilitated in accordance with Section 
18 of the document ‘Decommissioning of Bores (abandonment) of the 
Minimum construction of groundwater bores’ (Land and Water Biodiversity 
Committee 2003). 
Groundwater 
MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction 
Manager, 
Operations 
Manager 
All groundwater bore construction and groundwater abstraction will be 
licensed under the RIWI Act and managed in accordance with licence 
conditions and associated management measures.  Management 
measures will determine appropriate trigger levels for contingency actions.  
Associated monitoring will be conducted to compare results against these 
trigger levels. 
Groundwater 
MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
7.6.5 
Predicted Outcome 
After  mitigation  and  management  measures  have  been  applied,  the  Proposal  will  result  in  the 
following outcomes in relation to groundwater: 
 
the majority of groundwater abstraction will be short‐term and/or relatively small volumes 
over  a  number  of  locations,  which  will  significantly  reduce  the  likelihood  of  unacceptable 
impact; 
 
groundwater use will be licensed under the RIWI Act which will ensure sustainable use; 
 
compliance and implementation of the Hazardous Materials & Contamination Management 
Plan will reduce the risk
 
of groundwater contamination; and 
 
impacts on pastoral water supply are not considered likely.   
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
187
7.7 
NOISE, VIBRATION AND LIGHT 
7.7.1 
Overview 
7.7.1.1 
Noise 
The  approach  to  noise  impact  assessment  involves  consideration  of  noise  sources,  activities  and 
locations of those activities to identify areas for assessment.  The key considerations for this proposal 
are centred around short term construction noise, and longer term noise from rail operations. 
The use of earthmoving machinery, light vehicles, tracklaying and construction equipment are likely 
to be sources of noise during the construction phase of the Proposal.  Blasting may be necessary in 
isolated locations where continuous rock is encountered. 
Construction  noise  will  be  relatively  short  term  at  any  one  receptor,  as  the  construction  face  will 
continuously  advance  along  the  corridor.    Construction  noise  sources  are  expected  to  be  more 
mobile as machinery will be accessing areas of borrow and access roads that may be away from the 
rail centreline.  The logical basis for identifying noise sensitive premises however, relates to the rail 
centreline.  To incorporate the possible variations in the rail centreline, consideration has been given 
to the extremities of possible rail alignment within the Proposal Area. 
Receivers within the Proposal Area are generally clustered in the western end of the Proposal Area 
within freehold land, as there is a higher density of residences in this area than in the pastoral area.  
Due  to  the  isolated  nature  and  sparse  settlement  of  the  pastoral  land  area,  a  smaller  number  of 
residences will be exposed to noise from the Proposal. 
In  order  to  assess  the  potential  noise  impacts  associated  with  the  operation  of  the  Proposal,  OPR 
commissioned Lloyd George Acoustics to undertake preliminary noise investigations along the length 
of the rail (Appendix 6, Lloyd George Acoustics, 2010) in accordance with Preliminary Draft Guidance 
No. 14 – Road and Rail Transport Noise, Version 3 (DEC, 2000).  .  
Ambient  noise  levels  were  measured  at  four  locations  at  Oakajee  and  East  Chapman  Valley,  which 
were chosen to represent a range of conditions along the railway, in order to provide baseline data 
for the noise assessment.  The ambient background noise survey showed levels consistent with the 
rural  setting  ‐  measured  noise  levels  from  the  four  locations  varied  from  LA90  23  ‐  26  dB  at  night, 
while the day time levels ranged from LA90 27 ‐ 30 dB.  Noise events tend to be related to vehicle 
movements associated with agricultural activities and wind noise. 
Ambient night time noise levels at the four locations ranged from L
A90
 23 ‐ 26 dB, while the day time 
levels ranged from L
A90
 27 ‐ 30 dB, indicating relatively low background noise consistent with a rural 
setting (Appendix 6, Lloyd George  Acoustics, 2010). 
Railway noise was predicted using modelling with inputs including topographical data and train 
configuration (e.g. speed, height, number of wagons, number of movements per day etc.). In 
addition, to accurately predict the effect of barriers (hills or buildings), the noise source height of the 
locomotive was raised from the standard 0.5 m above the railhead to 4.0 m (Lloyd George Acoustics, 
2010a).   
Noise modelling was completed for the proposed current centreline (2010a) and for two alternative 
scenarios (2010b).  The preferred centreline of the proposed rail is not likely to change significantly 
unless further site investigations reveal potential obstacles.  Hence the preferred centreline 
represents the most likely scenario for the generation of operational noise. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
188
7.7.1.2 
Vibration and light 
Current  vibration  sources  throughout  the  Proposal  Area  are  restricted  to  minor  and  low  level 
sources, almost primarily from rural activities. 
There  are  few  light  sources  throughout  the  Proposal  Area,  particularly  in  the  pastoral  area.    Light 
sources are generally limited to farm houses, road traffic and occasional farming operations at night. 
7.7.2 
Key statutory requirements, environmental policy and guidance 
7.7.2.1 
EPA Objectives 
The EPA objectives for the management of noise, light and vibration are:  
 
to  protect  the  amenity  of  nearby  residents  from  noise  impacts  resulting  from  activities 
associated with the proposal by ensuring the noise levels meet statutory requirements and 
acceptable standards; and 
 
to  avoid  or  manage  potential  impacts  from  light  overspill  and  comply  with  acceptable 
standards. 
7.7.2.2 
EPA statements and guidelines 
The following EPA statements are relevant to noise: 
 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 3 ‐ Separation Distances Between Industrial and Sensitive Land 
Uses (EPA, 2005); 
 
EPA Draft Guidance Statement No. 8 ‐ Environmental Noise ; 
 
Preliminary  Draft  EPA  Draft  Guidance  Statement  No.  14  (Version  3)  ‐  Road  and  Rail 
Transportation Noise; and 
 
EPA Guidance No. 33 ‐ Environmental Guidance for Planning and Development (EPA, 2005). 
It should be noted that Guidance Statement No. 8 (Draft) Environmental Noise (EPA 2007) does not 
apply  to  road  and  rail  infrastructure,  and  is  used  here  only  by  way  of  providing  guidance  for 
methodology and to provide criteria to indicate the number of receptors for which train movements 
will be audible over background noise. 
7.7.2.3 
Applicable Legislation and Policy 
The following WA legislation is relevant to noise 
 
EP Act; and 
 
Environmental Protection (Noise) Regulations 1997. 
Sections  51,  62(4),  65  and  74(3)/50,  51  and  75  of  the  EP  Act  provide  the  legislative  framework  for 
managing  noise  impacts.    The  noise  limits  cited  by  the  Act  are  assigned  in  the  Environmental 
Protection (Noise) Regulations 1997 (Noise Regulations) and further guidance exists in EPA Guidance 
Statement No.8 (EPA 2007a).  Regulation 7 of the Noise Regulations requires that noise emitted from 
any premises must comply with assigned noise levels when received at any other premises and must 
be  free  of  the  intrusive  characteristics  of  tonality,  modulation  and  impulsiveness.    In  addition,  the 
noise emissions must not “significantly contribute” to an exceedance of the assigned levels. 
The assigned levels are specified under regulation 8 of the Noise Regulations, according to the type 
of premises receiving the noise.  For noise‐sensitive premises, the assigned levels recognise the time 
of  day  and  the  presence  of  commercial  and  industrial  land  use  zonings  and  major  roads  within  a 
450 m  radius  of  the  receiver.    The  Noise  Regulations  also  specify  requirements  relating  to  tonality, 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
189
modulation  and  impulsiveness,  and  to  emissions  that  may  “significantly  contribute”  to  an 
exceedance. 
The “influencing factor” is calculated for each noise‐sensitive premises receiving noise. It takes into 
account the amount of industrial and commercial land and the presence of major roads within a 450 
m radius around the noise receiver. 
WAPC’s State Planning Policy 5.4: Road and Rail Transport Noise and Freight Considerations in Land 
Use  Planning  (WAPC,  2009)  (SPP5.4)  is  the  policy  that  has  been  adopted  by  the  WA  Government 
when assessing nose from railways.  
The  Noise  Regulations  provide  the  framework  for  the  management  of  construction  noise.    They 
provide  guidance  on  acceptable  noise  levels  for  different  times  of  day  and  days  of  the  week.  
Construction  activities  conducted  outside  of  those  times  are  generally  subject  to  a  Construction 
Noise Management Plan to be approved under the Regulations.   
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə