Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə28/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   ...   41

7.7.3 
Aspects and Impacts 
Aspects  of  the  Proposal  that  will  contribute  to  noise  include  construction  activities  and  operation 
activities, in particular train movements. 
Potential  noise  impacts  can  be  separated  into  those  associated  with  construction  activities  (which 
will be short term and transient) and those associated with operations (which will be longer term). 
Potential noise, light and vibration impacts from construction activities include: 
 
short term changes to amenity and living conditions in and around residences close to the 
rail centreline; 
 
nuisance noise or vibrations from the use of construction equipment; 
 
isolated noise and vibration events from blasting (if required); 
 
nuisance lights from construction activities where additional lighting is required; and 
 
short term impacts on fauna adjacent to the activities from noise, light or vibration. 
Potential noise, light and vibration impacts from operations activities include: 
 
longer term changes to amenity and living conditions in and around residences close to the 
rail centreline; 
 
longer term changes to low level noise conditions at some distance from the rail centreline 
with occasional noise events depending upon ambient conditions; 
 
occasional nuisance noise or vibrations from the use of maintenance equipment; 
 
nuisance lights from trains, vehicles, road crossings or signals; and 
 
longer term impacts on fauna adjacent to the activities from noise, light or vibration. 
7.7.4 
Impact Assessment 
7.7.4.1 
Construction Noise 
General  construction  noise  will  be  short‐term  (weeks‐months)  as  the  construction  face  will 
continually advance along the Proposal Area. 
Sources  of  ballast  are  not  expected  to  come  from  the  most  noise  sensitive  areas  around  the 
Wokatherra  Gap  and  Chapman  Valley  where  the  density  of  residences  is  highest.    The  activities 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
190
associated with ballast production will be subject to regulation under Part V of the EP Act and Local 
Government approvals.  
Blasting may be necessary in isolated locations where continuous rock is encountered.  In the case of 
blasting,  the  EPA  notes  that  the  DEC  licensing  process  no  longer  addresses  blast  vibration  criteria. 
Accordingly,  the  EPA policy in relation  to assessments of proposals that involve blasting is  that  the 
criteria previously adopted in licence conditions should apply: 
 
Blasting during daytime (0700 – 1800 hours): 
a.  no vibration level resulting from blasting on any  premises or public place, when 
received at any other premises, may exceed a peak particle velocity of 10 mm/s; 
and  
b.  the vibration levels for 9 in any 10  consecutive blasts (regardless of the interval 
between  blasts)  on  any  premises  or  public  place,  when  received  at  any  other 
premises, must not exceed 5 mm/s; 
 
Blasting out of hours (1800 – 0700 hours): 
a.  no vibration level resulting from blasting on any  premises or public place, when 
received at any other premises, may exceed a peak particle velocity of 1.0 mm/s; 
and 
b.  the vibration levels for 9 in any 10  consecutive blasts (regardless of the interval 
between  blasts)  on  any  premises  or  public  place,  when  received  at  any  other 
premises, must not exceed 0.5 mm/s. 
7.7.4.2 
Operation Noise 
Noise  from  rolling  stock  on  rail  curves  is  very  dependent  on  the  radius  of  curvature.    The  OPR  rail 
uses  broad  curves  with  a  minimum  mainline  radius  of  1000  m;  however,  most  curves  are  at  or 
beyond the preferred radius of 2000 m.  At 2000 m noise from trains is generally not greatly different 
from straight tracks.   
The modelling results of the rail movements were assessed by Lloyd George Acoustics against SPP5.4 
(WAPC, 2009). The External Noise Exposure Level Criteria for Noise Sensitive Land Uses as defined in 
SPP5.4 are: 
 
Day time (6 am – 10 pm):  
o  Noise Target = 55 db 
o  Noise Limit = 60 db 
 
Night time (10 pm – 6 am) 
o  Noise Target = 50 db  
o  Noise Limit = 55 db 
The 5 dB difference between the outdoor noise “Target” and the outdoor noise “Limit represents an 
acceptable “margin” for compliance, provided that best practical efforts have been made to reduce 
noise (WAPC 2009).  
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
191
The assessment assumed that all significant buildings are noise sensitive receptors.  Based on OPR’s 
modelling the results are as follows: 
 
three receptors are predicted to exceed the outdoor Noise Limit criteria at night (> 55 dBA), 
which  refers  to  a  level  of  outdoor  noise  exposure  that  is  not  generally  regarded  as 
acceptable for conventional residential or other noise‐sensitive development. An additional 
three  receptors  that  exceed  the  Noise  limit  criteria  at  night  are  owned  by  the  WA  Land 
Authority  and  have  lease  conditions  that  mean  that  they  are  not  considered  to  be  noise 
sensitive premises; and 
 
seven  receptors  would  be  exposed  to  night‐time  noise  levels  above  the  Noise  Target 
category (50 dBA ‐ 55 dBA), which refers to a level of outdoor noise exposure that would be 
acceptable  for  residential  and  other  noise‐sensitive  development,  and  may  require 
mitigation.    An  additional  seven  receptors  in  this  category  are  owned  by  the  WA  Land 
Authority  and  have  lease  conditions  that  mean  that  they  are  not  considered  to  be  noise 
sensitive premises. 
Details of receivers that exceed limit or target criteria, excluding WA Land Authority properties, can 
be found in Table 7‐21.  The location of these receptors is shown in Figure 7‐2 and Figure 7‐3.  Noise 
level contours are provided for the overall alignment and within the Chapman Valley area, which has 
a higher density of population than the rest of the railway. 
Table 7‐21  Receivors and noise criteria 
Receivers 
Predicted Noise levels (dB 
L
Aeq (Night)

SPP 5.4 Criteria Assessment 
Lot 6088 
62 
Exceeds “Limit” Criteria of 55 
dB L
Aeq (Night)
 
59 Eastough-Yetina Rd, Yetina 
58 
479 Chapman Rd, East Chapman 
56 
12 Newmarracarra Rd, Kojarena 
54 
Exceeds “Target” Criteria of 
50 dB L
Aeq (Night)
 
2134 Valentine Rd, North Eradu 
54 
150 Lorimer Rd, Durawah
53 
Lot 14 
51 
694 Badgedong Rd, Wandana 
51 
1682 Valentine Rd, North Eradu 
51 
1183 Chapman Rd, East Chapman 
51 
In  addition  to  SPP  5.4  criteria,  noise  modelling  results  were  also  assessed  in  relation  to  the  limits 
defined  in  Preliminary  Draft  EPA  Guidance  Statements  No.  14  (Version  3)  ‐  Road  and  Rail 
Transportation Noise. 
The results show that 55 receiver lo`cations are predicted to exceed the Preliminary Draft Guidance 
No.  14  “N1”  rating,  and  therefore  noise  from  the  railway  may  result  in  some  impact  to  residents.  
Although this noise level is below the SPP 5.4 “Target” criteria, it indicates trains may be audible from 
approximately 55 buildings in proximity to the rail line. 
It should be noted that the building uses (residential or otherwise) of the noise receivers included in 
this assessment have not been verified. 
Alternative alignments 
In  recognition  of  the  possibility  that  the  rail  centreline  could  require  adjustment  if  unforeseen 
constraints  are  identified,  OPR  requested  Lloyd  George  Acoustics  to  model  two  alternative 
scenarios – a “Northern Alternative” and “Southern Alternative”.  These alternatives have not been 
the  subject  of  any  feasibility  investigations  and  represent  a  significant  deviation  from  what  is 
planned.  They have been included as seeing representative cases that provide for the outer bounds 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
192
of  noise  emissions  to  be  established  and  allow  for  some  flexibility  in  centreline  location.    The 
topographic  constraints  and  already  identified  considerations  through  the  Wokatherra  gap  area 
mean  that  the  proposed  rail  centreline  location  is  unlikely  to  change  markedly.  In  effect,  they 
represent  “worst  case”  scenarios  should  detailed  engineering  investigations  require  significant 
changes to the proposed centreline.  
Table 7‐22 below presents the numbers of noise receptors that would be impacted at levels above 
the L
Aeq(night) 
limit and target criteria as specified in SPP5.4. 
Table 7‐22  Noise modelling summary – comparison of results 
Modelled Case 
No. of sensitive receptors exceeding SPP5.4 
night Limit criteria of 55dB L
Aeq(8hour)
 
No. of sensitive receptors exceeding SPP5.4 
night Target criteria of 50dB L
Aeq(8hour)
 
Preferred Centreline 


Northern Alternative 
13 
13 
Southern Alternative 


The  location  of  noise  receptors  has  already  been  considered  in  route  selection  to  establish  the 
preferred  centreline  –  as  can  be  seen  from  the  assessment  in  Table  7‐22  above.    The  preferred 
alignment will impact upon the least number of residences.  It should be noted that the data above 
specifically  excludes  residences  that  are  owned  by  Landcorp  within  the  OIE  and  buffer  area  as  the 
lease terms of these properties allow for developments such as the rail. 
It should be noted that current ore haulage arrangements from Mid‐West iron ore mines using truck 
haulage along main roads may also have noise impacts. 
7.7.4.3 
Vibration and Light Impact Assessment 
Vibration  during  operation  is  not  expected  to  be  an  issue  beyond  20  m  from  the  tracks.    This 
assumption was based on recordings taken in the Pilbara on trains of similar characteristics. 
Blasting  may  be  a  short‐term  source  of  vibration  during  construction  however  it  will  occur  in 
accordance  with  Regulation  11  of  the  Environmental  Protection  (Noise)  Regulations  1997.    In 
addition consultation with nearby landholders will occur about the noise and vibration from blasting 
and compaction to determine suitable timing and/or mitigation for these events. 
 Based on the information above and the expected distances between the Proposal and residences, 
vibration is therefore considered unlikely to be an issue at any sensitive receiver (Appendix 6, Lloyd 
George  Acoustics  2010).    Vibration  monitoring  may  be  used  if  required  to  verify  these  predictions 
and has been included as a management action in Section 7.7.5.2.   
During  construction,  lights  may  be  used  to  support  activities  in  poor  light  conditions  in  a  limited 
number of locations for relatively short durations (weeks to months).  During operations the key light 
source will be on the locomotives – a transient source that will be directed to the tracks, as well as 
road  crossings  and  service  vehicle  headlights.    Maintenance  camps  may  also  be  a  light  source, 
however  these  camps  are  expected  to  be  in  remote  locations  away  from  residences.    Given  the 
above and the rural location of the Proposal, light spill has not been considered further as a factor. 
 
 

Figure 4.5
G E O R G E
L L O Y D
Ac
o
us
tic
s
Lloyd George Acoustics
by Daniel Lloyd
daniel@lgacoustics.com.au
(08) 9300 4188
Length Scale
001
0
20
40
60
80
km
Signs and symbols
Point receiver
Railway line
Noise level 
L
Aeq (night)
 dB
<=
50
  Below Noise Target
<=
55
  Above Noise Target - Below Noise Limit
>
55
  Above Noise Limit
Oakajee Railway L
Aeq(night)
 Noise Level Contours - Overall Alignment
Figure 7-2  Location of potentially noise impacted residences  - entire Proposal 

Figure 4.6
Signs and symbols
Point receiver
Railway line
Oakajee Industrial Area
Length Scale
00
0.4
0.8
1.6
2.4
3.2
km
Noise level 
L
Aeq (night)
 dB
<=
50
  Below Noise Target
<=
55
  Above Noise Target - Below Noise Limit
>5
5
  Above Noise Limit
Oakajee Railway L
Aeq(night)
 Noise Level Contours - Chapman Valley
G E O R G E
L L O Y D
Ac
o
us
tic
s
Lloyd George Acoustics
by Daniel Lloyd
daniel@lgacoustics.com.au
(08) 9300 4188
Figure 7-3  Location of potentially noise impacted residences  - Chapman Valley 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
195
7.7.5 
Proposed Mitigation and Management Measures 
7.7.5.1 
Performance Management 
OPR has  developed environmental management objectives, targets and performance indicators for 
noise (Table 7‐23). 
Table 7‐23  Noise and vibration management objectives, targets and performance indicators 
OPR Management Objective 
Target 
Performance Indicators 
Prevent adverse impacts on sensitive 
receptors. 
 
Noise levels at sensitive receptors 
do not exceed the targets set in 
SPP5.4. 
 
Compliance with the construction 
section of the Noise Regulations. 
 
Noise monitoring shows 
compliance with SPP5.4 
 
Noise incidents logged in OPR’s 
incident register. 
7.7.5.2 
Management Strategies 
The preferred centreline has been selected to minimise both the number of receptors impacted and 
the degree of impact at those receptors. 
Construction noise mitigation will be the subject of a Construction Noise Management Plan that will 
include  relevant  controls  for  any  blasting  activities  that  may  be  required.    The  Construction  Noise 
Management  Plan  will  be  subject  to  approval  by  DEC  under  the  Environmental  Protection  (Noise) 
Regulations 1997 prior to commencement of construction. 
OPR will ensure that its rolling stock is based on Pilbara best practice and will be subject to regular 
maintenance, which will ensure that noise is managed.  Whilst OPR will be using locomotives similar 
to  those  used  in  the  Pilbara,  it  will  investigate  the  possibility  of  further  muffling;  however,  the 
feasibility of such controls is yet to be determined.   
Operational  Noise  mitigation  will  be  required  for  the  residential  premises  predicted  to  exceed  the 
SPP 5.4 criteria.  It is anticipated that any noise control management will be determined following a 
visual  assessment  of  each  property  and  extensive  discussions  and  negotiations  with  the  property 
owners. 
Investigations  into  the  use  of  railway  cuttings  or  noise  barriers  close  to  the  residences  will  be 
undertaken with a view to achieve an external noise level at the facade of residential properties that 
is as low as reasonably practicable.  Should the noise levels exceed the SPP 5.4 Target criteria, then 
upgrades  to  the  building  facades,  in  the  form  of  window,  roof  and/or  door  treatments  will  be 
implemented.    In  cases  where  the  SPP  5.4  Limit  criteria  are  exceeded  and  cannot  be  practicably 
reduced, then property acquisition and relocation will be considered.    
Visual  surveys  will  help  determine  if  barriers  will  be  effective,  as  this  is  highly  dependent  on  the 
geometry of the house and the geography of its surrounds 
 Landholder consultation processes will be completed (i.e. all affected landholders contacted) prior to 
commencement of construction, and will be ongoing in relation to operational noise.   OPR will use a 
continuous improvement approach through its Environmental Management System to ensure that a 
complaints management system is in place, noise incidents are recorded, investigated and additional 
management  measures  considered.    Annual  reviews  of  performance  will  be  completed,  and  it  is 
expected  that  public  annual  reporting  will  provide  evidence  of  noise  emission  levels  and 
management performance.  
Any future land use change or development close to the Proposal Area may require consideration of 
operational noise. 
Table 7‐24 below summarises the proposed noise, vibration and light management strategies.   

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
196
Table 7‐24  Proposed noise, vibration and light management strategies 
Management Strategies 
Relevant 
EMP 
Phase 
Responsible 
Persons 
Consultation programme with affected landholders based around the 
preferred centreline to identify and agree upon mitigation options that may 
include external noise barriers, internal sound proofing, building relocation or 
property purchase. 

Design, 
Construction
& Operation 
Regional 
Manager, 
Project 
Director, 
Operations 
Manager 
A Construction Noise Management Plan will be submitted for approval in 
accordance with the Environmental Protection (Noise) Regulations 1997 
prior to commencement of construction activities. 
Construction 
Noise MP 
Construction 
Construction 
Manager 
Design and place any construction lighting away from residents to reduce 
intrusion where practicable.  Design and place lighting in accordance with 
AS4282-1997.   
- Construction 
Construction 
Manager 
Noise will be managed using a combination of noise reduction methods, and 
will comply with the Noise Regulations (construction) and SPP5.4 (rail 
operation) at all times.  If the final alignment differs from what has been 
modelled, remodelling will be conducted to ensure that the relevant 
legislation can be met, and personnel will be made aware of noise related 
issues during inductions. 
Operation 
Noise MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction 
Manager, 
Operations 
Manager 
Consultation with the occupants of affected premises regarding key 
construction activities such as blasting, haulage, compacting and pile driving 
will continue throughout construction periods. 
Construction 
Noise MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Public 
Relations 
Manager 
Personnel will be made aware of noise related issues during inductions. 
Construction 
Noise MP, 
Operation 
Noise MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction 
Manager 
Develop an EMS to ISO14001 standard to include commitments to 
continuous improvement, monitoring, reporting and incident management 

Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
An Operation Noise Management Plan will be developed which will include 
detailed  information on the following: 
 
selection of equipment; 
 
noise monitoring at designated sensitive receptors; 
 
vibration monitoring to confirm expected levels at selected locations; 
 
verification of noise modelling results; 
 
monitoring to determine the success of noise mitigation measures
 
contingency actions to be taken when the SPP5.4 target is 
exceeded, or a noise complaint is received; 
 
incident management procedures including complaint management; 
 reporting 
requirements; 
and 
 
specification of zones where future development will require 
residential development to consider “deemed-to-comply” measures. 
Operation 
Noise MP 
Operation  
Environment 
Manager 
7.7.6 
Predicted Outcome 
Ambient  noise  levels  will  increase  during  both  the  construction  and  the  operational  phases  within 
adjacent areas.  The  preferred  centreline has  been specifically selected  to  minimise  the number of 
receptors impacted and the degree of impact minimised where possible.   
Compliance  with  noise  regulations  during  construction  criteria  expected  to  be  able  to  be  achieved 
subject  to  a  Construction  Noise  Management  Plan  under  the  Environmental  Protection  (Noise) 
Regulations (1997). 
As currently planned, during operations the Proposal will result in three residences receiving noise in 
excess of the SPP5.4 limit, and an additional seven residences receiving noise in excess of the SPP5.4 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
197
target  criteria.  Up  to  55  receptors  are  expected  to  occasionally  experience  noise  levels  that  are 
clearly audible above background noise. 
The  impacts  of  rail  noise  are  expected  to  be  most  evident  on  properties  through  which  the  rail 
traverses. OPR has commenced consultation with a view to negotiating suitable mitigation and land 
access packages in relation to use of the land and making consideration of factors such as noise.  OPR 
is committed to consultation at the individual landholder level  throughout  the life of  the Proposal. 
Properties for which the rail does not directly traverse, but which are exposed to noise levels above 
the target levels identified in SPP5.4 will also be consulted regarding noise exposure and mitigation 
options.  The consultation process will be used to confirm the building use (residential or otherwise) 
with landholders.  This consultation process and the associated mitigation packages are expected to 
result in compliance with SPP5.4. 
A series of management measures designed to ensure consideration of noise in equipment selection, 
monitoring  and  verification  of  modelling,  complaint  and  incident  management,  continuous 
improvement and workforce education are expected to assist OPR to manage noise to an acceptable 
level. 
Light impacts are able to be managed under Australian Standard AS4282‐1997, and vibration levels at 
sensitive receptors are expected to be insignificant. 
1   ...   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə