Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə29/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   ...   41

 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
198
7.8 
AIR QUALITY (DUST) 
7.8.1 
Overview 
Dust  is  a  common  feature  through  much  of  the  Proposal  Area  due  to  the  predominant  rural  and 
pastoral landuses in  the  surrounding  area.    Dust  generated  in  these  areas  is currently  restricted  to 
localised, short‐term events caused by the movement of cattle, and vehicle movements on unsealed 
roads.    In  addition,  large  scale  episodic  dust  events  caused  by  general  dust  lift  during  windy 
conditions occur occasionally and may lead to exceedances of NEPM levels.  
Within  freehold  areas,  dust  is  also  generated  from  erosion  processes  due  to  agricultural  activities 
such as ploughing prior to seeding and the summer grazing of stock (DAFWA, 2007). 
7.8.2 
Key statutory requirements, environmental policy and guidance 
7.8.2.1 
EPA Objectives 
The  EPA  objective  for  the  management  of  air  quality  is  to  ensure  that  emissions  do  not  adversely 
affect environmental values or the health, welfare and amenity of people and land uses by meeting 
statutory requirements and acceptable standards. 
7.8.2.2 
EPA statements and guidelines 
 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 3 ‐ Separation Distances Between Industrial and Sensitive Land 
Uses (EPA, 2005); 
 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 15 ‐ Emissions of Oxides of Nitrogen from Gas Turbines (EPA, 
2000); 
 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 18 ‐ Prevention of Air Quality Impacts from Land Development 
Sites (EPA, 2000); and 
 
EPA  Guidance Statement  No. 33  ‐  Environmental  Guidance for Planning and  Development 
(EPA, 2005). 
7.8.2.3 
Applicable Legislation and Policy 
 
EP Act and subsidiary regulations; 
 
PM
10 
– National Environmental Pollution Council (NEPC, 2007) Standard; 
 
Total  Suspended  Particles  (TSP)  –  Kwinana  Environmental  Protection  Policy  (Area  C 
Standard, EPA 1992); and 
 
Dust deposition – NSW EPA (2005) Standard. 
National Environmental Protection Measure 
In June 1998 a NEPM for Ambient Air Quality was endorsed by the National Environment Protection 
Council  (NEPC).    The  desired  environmental  outcome  of  this  Measure  is  ambient  air  quality  that 
allows  for  the  adequate  protection  of  human  health  and  well  being  (NEPC  1998).    The  measure 
included  standards  for  air  quality,  including  for  particulates  as  PM
10
.    In  2003,  the  NEPM  was 
amended to include advisory reporting standards for particles as PM
2.5
 (NEPC 2003).   
The NEPM standards and goals for particulates are shown in Table 7‐25.  
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
199
Table 7‐25  NEPM for ambient air quality 
Pollutant 
Averaging period 
Maximum concentration 
Maximum allowable 
exceedences 
Standards and goal for pollutants other than particulates as PM
2.5
 
Particles as PM
10
 
1 day 
50 µg/m
3
 
5 days a year 
Advisory reporting standards and goal for particulates as PM
2.5
  
Particles as PM
2.5
 
1 day 
25 µg/m
3
 
Goal is to gather sufficient data 
nationally to facilitate a review 
of Advisory Reporting 
Standards 
Other applicable guidelines and standards include: 
 
Land development sites and impact on air quality – A guideline for the prevention of dust 
and smoke pollution from land development sites in WA (DEC, 1996); 
 
Dust  Control;  Best  Practice  in  Environmental  Management  Series  (Environment  Australia 
1998b); 
 
Air Quality and Air Pollution Modelling Guidance Notes (DEC, 2000); 
 
A  guideline  for  the  development  and  implementation  of  a  dust  management  plan  (Draft, 
DEC 2008); and 
 
National Environmental Protection (Ambient Air Quality) Measure (NEPC, 2003). 
7.8.3 
Aspects and Impacts 
Proposal activities or areas that may result in dust emissions include: 
 
exposed surfaces such as cleared land and construction sites; 
 
construction earthworks, haulage and topsoil stripping and stockpiling; 
 
blasting and crushing of rock from quarries and borrow areas; 
 
vehicle movements on unpaved roads; and 
 
ore transport. 
All  of  these  aspects  may  lead  to  increased  levels  of  dust  in  the  atmosphere,  and  entering  the 
surrounding environment, both human and natural. 
7.8.4 
Dust Impact Assessment 
Dust  emissions  are  expected  to  be  primarily  generated  during  construction  of  the  Proposal.  There 
may be some minor dust emissions during operation due to vehicle movements and ore transport; 
however these events will be intermittent and are unlikely to significantly contribute to dust levels in 
the area.    
Best  practice  dust  controls  (such  as  water  trucks,  chemical  polymers  (if  required),  vehicle  speed 
limits, progressive clearing and rehabilitation etc) will ensure that dust emissions are minimised and 
avoided.    Speed  limits  will  be  set  and  enforced  and  vehicle  movements  will  be  restricted  to 
designated access tracks.   
In addition the construction face will be constantly moving, meaning that impacts from dust on the 
surrounding environment will generally be short‐term in nature.  Progressive and staged clearing will 
ensure  the  number  of  open  areas  is  limited  at  any  one  time  and  visual  dust  monitoring  will  be 
implemented  during  both  construction  and  operation  phases,  to  ensure  fugitive  emissions  are 
compliant.   

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
200
In  accordance  with  contractual  arrangements  with  its  clients,  all  iron  ore  products  transported  by 
OPR  along  the  rail  line  will  have  a  specified  moisture  content.    This  requirement  is  expected  to 
reduce dust emissions such that no further dust mitigation will be required for rail transport of ore.  
Furthermore, due to the considerable separation distance between the rail alignment and sensitive 
receptors it is unlikely that complaints from the community will be raised in relation to potential dust 
emissions.  Nevertheless, in the unlikely circumstance that dust emissions from wagons becomes an 
issue, OPR will investigate and implement suitable contingency actions that may include the use of 
covers, surface sprays or chemical sealants.  
7.8.5 
Proposed Mitigation and Management Measures 
7.8.5.1 
Performance Management 
OPR has  developed environmental management objectives, targets and performance indicators for 
air quality (Table 7‐26). 
Table 7‐26  Air quality management objectives, targets and performance indicators 
Management Objective 
Target 
Performance Indicators 
Prevent dust impacts on human 
population, recreation areas, and 
surrounding habitats during construction. 
No impacts to residential and recreation 
areas. 
Dust monitoring 
Complaints Register 
Prevent dust impacts on human 
population, recreation areas, and 
surrounding habitats during construction 
No dust complaints attributable to rail 
construction from nearby residents or 
local recreational areas 
Dust monitoring 
Complaints received and registered 
7.8.5.2 
Management Strategies 
Table 7‐27 outlines the proposed management strategies for air quality both during construction and 
operation of the Proposal. 
Table 7‐27  Proposed air quality management strategies 
Management Strategies 
Relevant EMP 
Phase 
Responsible Persons 
Perform visual dust monitoring of construction and operations areas to 
ensure that fugitive emissions meet required standards.  Dust 
management will include the following measures: 
 
progressive and staged clearing of vegetation to limit the 
number of open areas
 
restrict vehicle movements to designated access tracks; 
 
revegetate cleared areas no longer being used; 
 
surface with gravel/lump product; 
 apply 
water 
sprays; 
 
use chemical polymers to stabilise surfaces; 
 
set and enforce vehicle speed limits; 
 
incident reporting and follow up system; and 
 continuous 
improvement. 
Chemical polymers may also be used to stabilise surfaces if required. 
Air Quality 
Management 
Plan (AQMP) 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction Manager, 
Operations Manager 
Control occupational dust levels in accordance with the requirements of 
the Mines Safety and Inspection Regulations (1995) and Occupational 
Health and Safety Act (1984) 
AQMP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction Manager, 
Operations Manager 
Prepare and implement an AQMP that includes objectives, targets, and 
detailed management actions to minimise dust emissions at source, 
monitoring, incident management, and contingency measures 
AQMP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Environment Manager, 
Construction Manager, 
Operations Manager 
7.8.6 
Predicted Outcome 
Dust  emissions  are  expected  at  low  levels  during  both  construction  and  operational  phases  of  the 
Proposal.  Emissions from construction will be short‐term and subject to best practice dust controls.  
Emissions from operations will be longer term but are expected to be insignificant.  

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
201
7.9 
SOIL QUALITY 
7.9.1 
Overview 
Soil  quality  is  one  of  the  most  significant  factors  in  farming  practice  and  is  central  to  agricultural 
productivity. 
The Proposal Area intersects 30 land systems and 51 soil landscape systems.  The dominant soil types 
are shallow loams with red‐brown hardpan.  There are two major geological terrains; the northern 
Perth Basin and the Yilgarn Craton.   
Soils in the pastoral area are relatively undisturbed – they may have been influenced by broad scale 
grazing  and  isolated  disturbance.    In  the  agricultural  area  the  soils  have  been  subject  to  clearing, 
more  intensive  grazing  and  cropping.    The  areas  of  most  productive  farmland  are  based  on  loamy 
soils with good structure and water holding characteristics.  Large areas of sandy soils have also been 
cleared for agriculture.  The western portion of the agricultural area supports more reliable cropping 
and grazing activities.  The intensity of this activity can influence soil structure.  The eastern portion 
tends to be cropped opportunistically based on seasonal conditions and soil structure tends to reflect 
natural soil conditions rather than soil management practices.   
Weeds are a consideration for environmental management in agricultural areas, having the potential 
to  be  spread  through  natural  vectors  as  well  as  agricultural  practice  and  vehicle  and  material 
movements.  Weeds can have impacts on farm practice as well as on the natural environment.  OPR 
has  prepared  a  weed  map  on  the  basis  of  vegetation  and  flora  survey  work  that  shows  that  the 
freehold  section  of  the  Proposal  Area  has  comparatively  heavy  weed  burdens  consistent  with  the 
more intensive agricultural activity.  A further consideration in the freehold area is the presence of 
crop  diseases.    Two  key  crop  diseases,  rust  (in  wheat)  and  anthracnose  (in  lupins),  have  been 
identified  as  being  potentially  present  within  the  Proposal  Area  and  able  to  be  transported  by 
vehicles (Planfarm, 2010). 
Disturbance of Acid Sulphate Soils (ASS) can lead to acid drainage water that can have both on‐site 
and  off‐site  impacts.    No  prior  ASS  risk  mapping  had  been  completed  for  the  Proposal  Area.    A 
desktop  review  by  GHD  (2010)  utilised  geological  information  to  assess  ASS  risk.    The  study 
concluded  that  there  is  a  low  to  moderate  risk  of  ASS  prevalent  along  the  majority  of  the  main 
alignment.    High  risk  areas  are  predominantly  associated  with  alluvium  and  isolated  salt  pans 
occurring at several locations generally towards the eastern end of the Proposal Area.   
The broad scale rural usage of the area and limited quantities of hazardous materials means that the 
risk  of  soil  contamination  is  low,  with  isolated  and  small  scale  contamination  from  diesel  and 
chemicals possible.  Soils can also be influenced by farming and salinisation of soils from agricultural 
clearing and rising water tables is well documented.  Farm management practices can also influence 
soil acidity. 
Throughout the Proposal Area there is evidence of minor soil erosion from both water and wind. 
7.9.2 
Key statutory requirements, environmental policy and guidance 
7.9.2.1 
EPA Objectives 
The EPA objectives for the management of soil quality are: 
 
to ensure that emissions do not adversely affect environment values or the health, welfare 
and  amenity  of 
people
  and  land  uses  by  meeting  statutory  requirements  and  acceptable 
standards; and 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
202
 
to  maintain  the  integrity,  ecological  functions  and  environmental  values  of  the  soil  and 
landform. 
7.9.2.2 
EPA statements and guidelines 
 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 4 ‐ Rehabilitation of Terrestrial Ecosystems; 
 
EPA Position Statement No. 5 ‐ Protection and Ecological Sustainability of the Rangelands in 
Western Australia; 
 
EPA Position Statement No. 8 ‐ Environmental Protection in Natural Resource Management
and 
 
EPA Guidance No. 33 ‐ Environmental Guidance for Planning and Development (EPA, 2005). 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 4 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 4 ‐ Rehabilitation of Terrestrial Ecosystems (EPA 2006), recognises that 
a  key  aim  of  rehabilitation  is  to  ensure  the  long‐term  stability  of  soils,  landforms,  and  hydrology 
required  for  the  sustainability  of  sites.    When  discussing  abiotic  factors,  the  Guidance  Statement 
describes  the  maintenance  of  soil  properties  as  being  a  key  aspect  of  rehabilitation  to  ensure 
vegetation establishment and resistance to erosion.  It also states that effective topsoil and subsoil 
management is essential to ensure adequate plant growth and normal root distribution patterns.   
EPA Position Statement No. 5 
EPA  Position  Statement  No.  5  ‐  Environmental  Protection  and  Ecological  Sustainability  of  the 
Rangelands  in  Western  Australia  (EPA  2004)  outlines  the  environmental  attributes  and  values  of 
rangelands,  their  pressures  and  environmental  condition,  management  issues,  principles  and 
objectives  for  the  environmental  protection  and  ecological  sustainability  of  the  rangelands  and 
management  responses  required.    This  Position  Statement  identifies  grazing,  horticulture  (in  the 
floodplains), fire, feral animals and weeds, mining and climate change as pressures on the rangeland 
environment.  
EPA Position Statement No. 8 
EPA  Position  Statement  No.  8  ‐  Environmental  Protection  in  Natural  Resource  Management  (EPA 
2005)  outlines  the  EPA’s  role  in  natural  resource  management  with  respect  to  evaluating 
environmental  performance.    The  EPA  has  been  given  the  task  of  environmental  performance 
evaluation  of  natural  resource  management.    This  task  will  link  closely  with  WA’s  State  of  the 
Environment Reporting Program. 
7.9.2.3 
Applicable Legislation and Policy 
The following policy and guidelines are also relevant to soil as an environmental factor: 
 
Landform Design for Rehabilitation (Environment Australia, 1998); 
 
Identification and Investigation of Acid Sulfate Soils (DEC, 2004); 
 
General Guidance on Managing Acid Sulfate Soils (DEC, 2003); 
 
Planning Bulletin No. 64 ‐ Acid Sulfate Soils (WAPC, 2004); and 
 
Agriculture and Related Resources Act 1976. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
203
Acid Sulfate Soils Planning Bulletin No. 64 
The WAPC Planning Bulletin No. 64 ‐ Acid Sulphate Soils (WAPC 2003b), provides advice on matters 
that  should  be  taken  into  account  in  the  development  of  lands  that  contain  ASS.   The  Bulletin 
provides planning guidelines for ASS and refers proponents to the ASS Guidelines Series, prepared by 
DEC, which assist developers and individuals to manage development in areas where ASS may, or will 
be affected.   
7.9.3 
Aspects and Impacts 
Aspects of the Proposal with the potential to impact soil quality include clearing, topsoil stripping and 
storage, creation of borrow pits, vehicle access tracks, trenches, bunds and other drainage features, 
earth moving activities, vehicle movements, and use of hydrocarbons.  The creation of a long, linear 
drainage  obstruction  for  the  rail  embankment  could  impact  indirectly  on  soils  be  causing  localised 
changes in water flows leading to ponding or erosion. 
The resulting potential soil quality impacts include: 
 
alterations to soil chemistry (particularly Acid Sulfate Soils); 
 
alterations to soil structure caused by disturbance; 
 
the impact of soil disturbance on productive farm land (including farm scale biosecurity); 
 
erosion by wind or water; 
 
soil contamination; and 
 
spread of weeds and diseases. 
7.9.4 
Soil Quality Impact Assessment 
In this section, consideration is given to a range of soil related environmental issues throughout both 
the  pastoral  and  freehold  areas.    OPR  has  commenced  consultation  with  landholders  who  may  be 
impacted directly by the Proposal.  OPR recognises that individual landholder issues will be need to 
be addressed through one on one consultations with regard to land access and the localised impacts 
of the Proposal on an individual’s landholding. Remediation and management of the impacts on the 
individual properties will need to undertaken in consultation with each landholder.  
The rail embankment will be comprised of compacted soil material and is not expected to have any 
direct  or  indirect  impacts  on  adjacent  soils.    The  design  and  compaction  specifications  for  the 
embankment  mean  that  little  erosion  of  this  material  is  tolerable  from  an  engineering  perspective 
and hence no significant soil impacts are expected. 
Although no compaction machinery is expected to be used on construction haul roads, construction 
equipment repeatedly traversing areas will lead to compaction of soils from construction machinery 
traffic within borrow areas and haulage routes to the Rail Corridor can be expected (Planfarm, 2010).  
Soil  compaction  can  be  alleviated  using  deep  ripping  which  can  be  achieved  using  construction 
machinery.  As the traffic areas are no longer required, it is expected that these areas will be deep 
ripped to alleviate any soil compaction. 
The  location  of  borrow  areas  is  subject  to  further  investigation  and  consultation  with  landowners.  
Borrow  material  will  be  sourced  from  as  close  as  feasible  to  the  rail  centreline  (certain  soil 
characteristics  and  quantities  are  required  to  make  a  borrow  area  feasible).    The  economics  of 
accessing  borrow  will  tend  to  drive  locations  to  be  close  to  the  rail  centreline.    It  is  expected  that 
most borrow will be sourced from within the final operational corridor. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
204
The  access  routes  to  and  from  borrow  areas  are  also  likely  to  have  localised  influence  on  surface 
water  runoff  which  may  cause  localised  erosion.    Localised  water  erosion  can  be  managed  using 
small  scale  earthen  drainage  features  to  divert  flows.    In  some  cases,  farms  may  have  existing 
drainage systems that OPR’s surface water management will integrate with. 
Sandy textured soils are also likely to be prone to wind erosion from disturbance.  Management of 
this risk is usually achieved by retention of organic matter on and in the soil surface, or with cover 
crops.  
The majority of borrow material required is within the pastoral area where availability of water is the 
over‐riding  factor  influencing  farm  productivity.    The  creation  of  areas  of  short  term  ponding  and 
aggregation  of  water  may  lead  to  localised  water  erosion  but  may  also  create  areas  of  localised 
increased  soil  moisture  and  vegetative  growth.    These  areas  can  be  attractive  for  weed 
establishment. 
At a farm scale, individual biosecurity considerations and the unique nature of each farm and farm 
plan means that issues tend to be managed at an individual landholder down to a paddock scale.  By 
matching the scale of planning to individual landholdings, issues such as weed management can also 
be considered in the context to the overall impact on farming operations and the farm plan.   
Based on a preliminary assessment, only 16% of the Proposal length is expected to have a moderate 
to  high  potential  to  impact  on  ASS  (GHD,  2010).    Of  these  areas,  only  a  small  portion  (1.3%  of  the 
Proposal) is expected to require excavation as in most cases excavation will be avoided. The higher 
inherent  ASS  risks  tend  to  occur  in  the  pastoral  zone,  however  there  is  very  little  cutting  work 
required for the rail, leaving a low residual risk.    Borrow pits are relatively shallow features that are 
not  located  within  areas  where  there  is  an  elevated  risk  of  sulphidic  materials  and  are  unlikely  to 
generate any acid drainage. 
No contaminated sites are known from the Proposal Area and the likelihood of soil contamination is 
limited to small scale contamination resulting from  spillage of diesel or pesticides.  The increase in 
use  of  diesel  and  potential  for  additional  use  of  herbicides  associated  with  the  project 
implementation makes the likelihood of contamination higher.  Standard controls for storage and use 
of hazardous materials are available to reduce the risk of contamination. 
1   ...   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə