Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   41

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
This document and attachments comprise the Public Environmental Review (PER) documentation for 
the proposed Oakajee Rail Development (the Proposal), a Proposal for construction and operation of 
rail infrastructure to connect Mid‐West mining operations with the Oakajee Port. 
The proponent for the Proposal is Oakajee Port and Rail Pty Ltd (OPR) which was established as an 
infrastructure provider to develop and coordinate an iron ore supply chain comprising rail and port 
infrastructure for iron ore sourced from the Mid‐West region of WA. 
Development Background 
The Proposal is a component of the larger Oakajee Port and Rail Development, also consisting of: 
 
A  deepwater  port  facility  at  Oakajee  for  which  the  Minister  for  State  Development  is  the 
proponent.    The  Oakajee  Deepwater  Port  was  approved  by  the  WA  Government  in  1998, 
with the release of Ministerial Statement 469.  
The  original  approval  was  subject  to  additional  processes  under  the  Environmental 
Protection Act 1986 in 2009, as follows: 
o  Section  45C  (clarification  of  approved  Proposal)  –  clarification  of  the  location  and 
scale of the Proposal was approved by the Chairman of the Environmental Protection 
Authority  (EPA)  under  delegated  authority  on  the  2  September  2009,  with 
administrative revisions on the 1 December 2009; and 
o  Section 46 (extension of time to implement the Proposal) – a three year extension to 
the  substantial  commencement  date  was  approved  by  the  Minister  for  the 
Environment on the 25 November 2009 via the release of Statement No. 815. 
 
The  Oakajee  Terrestrial  Port  Development  which  will  include  the  infrastructure  necessary 
for  the  acceptance,  storage  and  export  of  ore  materials  to  the  overseas  market.    This 
proposal  is  the  subject  of  a  separate  and  parallel  approval  process  for  which  OPR  is  the 
proponent.  This  proposal  is  for  the  infrastructure  required  to  develop  and  operate  a  45 
Mtpa iron ore export facility as a first stage.   
It is understood that the Government of WA has plans to further develop the Oakajee area 
as a multi‐user, multi‐product port when there is a demand for further import and export 
facilities  serving  the  region  and  in  particular  the  Oakajee  Industrial  Estate.    Development 
beyond OPR’s 45Mtpa iron ore project will be the subject to future approvals processes and 
stakeholder consultation. 
On  20  March  2009  the  State  of  WA  and  OPR  entered  into  a  State  Development  Agreement  (SDA).  
This  SDA  provided  OPR  exclusive  rights  to  build  the  Oakajee  Port  and  a  northern  railway  line,  and 
operate it for a determined period. 
Proposal Overview 
The  railway  and  the  facilities  covered  in  this  Proposal  will  connect  Oakajee,  approximately  24 km 
north of Geraldton, to Jack Hills, 380 km to the north‐east, in the Mid‐West of WA. 
The  objective  of  the  Proposal  is  to  develop  an  open  access  world‐class  rail  ore  transport 
infrastructure for the State of WA, including those components outlined in Table ES‐1. 
The key characteristics and environmental footprint of the Proposal are summarised in Table ES‐1: 
Figures ES‐1 and ES‐2 highlight the environmental footprint of the Proposal. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
ii 
 
Table ES‐1 
Key characteristics of the Proposal 
Non-spatial elements 
Description 
Proposal Life 
In excess of 50 years 
Throughput 
45 Mtpa of iron ore 
Train Operations 
Diesel electric locomotives, up to 200 wagons (approximately 2 km in length) with a 
carrying capacity of approximately 20,000 tonnes.  Approximately 18 train movements 
per day (9 each way). 
Operating hours 
24 hours/day, 365 days/year 
Accommodation 
Construction: 6 camps capable of holding up to 3000 personnel in total 
Operation: Up to 2 camps holding up to 80 personnel in total 
Construction timeframe 
Approximately 36 months 
Groundwater requirements  
Construction: approximately 3.5 GL (total over 36 months),  
Operation: approximately 140 ML per year 
Spatial elements 
Description 
Approximate 
footprint 
Rail Corridor 
Includes approximately 570 km of rail line including a 10 – 15 km 
spur, 20 km spur line near Mullewa , access roads, rail crossings, rail 
loops, rail sidings optic fibre cable, water pipeline, approximately 
nine bridges. Final operating disturbance width of 50 – 80 m 
4500 ha 
Construction activities 
Including borrow pits, ballast quarries, turkey’s nests, associated 
access roads 
1450 ha 
Supporting facilities 
Including accommodation camps, lay down areas, communication 
towers, water supply, workshops, associated access roads 
1050 ha 
Total area of native vegetation 
clearing 
Maximum area of native vegetation clearing within the freehold area 
100 ha 
Approximate area of native vegetation clearing within the pastoral 
area 
5900 ha 
Total area of disturbance 
Combination of native vegetation clearing and disturbance of cleared 
land. 
7000 ha 
 

Meekatharra
Meekatharra
KalbarriKalbarri
Mount MagnetMount Magnet
MullewaMullewa
Figure No:
CAD Resources File No:
Drawn:
CAD Resources
02
0
Scale
MGA94 (Zone 50)
6900000mN
200000mE
40km
7000000mN
7100000mN
6900000mN
7000000mN
7100000mN
300000mE
400000mE
500000mE
600000mE
700000mE
200000mE
300000mE
400000mE
500000mE
600000mE
700000mE
g1660_Pub_PER_R_F021_01
Notes:
Project Overview
ProposedProposed
ConservationConservation
ProposedProposed
ConservationConservation
NatureNature
ReserveReserve
NationalNational
ParkPark
GeraldtonGeraldton
OakajeeOakajee
Jack HillsJack Hills
Weld RangeWeld Range
Greenough
Greenough
River
River
Murchison
Murchison
Murchison
Murchison
River
River
RiverRiver
Sanford
Sanford
RiverRiver
Figure ES-1  Proposal Area

Oakajee
Mullewa
Mullewa
Northampton
Northampton
LOCALITY
OakajeeOakajee
Figure No:
CAD Resources File No:
Drawn:
CAD Resources
g1660_Pub_PER_P_F021_02
01
0
Scale
MGA94 (Zone 50)
6950000mN
6850000mN
6950000mN
6850000mN
250000mE
250000mE
350000mE
350000mE
450000mE
450000mE
Road Road
Mt Magnet Mt Magnet
Geraldton
Geraldton
Yalgoo
Yalgoo
20km
ProposedProposed
Conservation ParkConservation Park
WoolgorongWoolgorong
Pastoral leasePastoral lease
ProposedProposed
Conservation ParkConservation Park
WoolgorongWoolgorong
Pastoral leasePastoral lease
Proposed Conservation ParkProposed Conservation Park
Twin Peaks Pastoral LeaseTwin Peaks Pastoral Lease
Proposed Conservation ParkProposed Conservation Park
Narloo Pastoral LeaseNarloo Pastoral Lease
ProposedProposed
Conservation ParkConservation Park
Yuin Pastoral LeaseYuin Pastoral Lease
East YunaEast Yuna
Nature ReserveNature Reserve
WandanaWandana
Nature ReserveNature Reserve
Bindoo HillBindoo Hill
Nature ReserveNature Reserve
UrawaUrawa
Nature ReserveNature Reserve
ProposedProposed
Conservation ParkConservation Park
Moresby RangeMoresby Range
WokatherraWokatherra
Nature ReserveNature Reserve
ProposedProposed
Conservation ParkConservation Park
Moresby RangeMoresby Range
WokatherraWokatherra
Nature ReserveNature Reserve
OakajeeOakajee
Refer toRefer to
EnlargementEnlargement
Enlargement
Notes:
DEC Estates data supplied by Department of Environment and Conservation
Project Overview
Freehold / Pastoral Interface
Figure ES-2   Proposal Area (Freehold Area)

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 

 
Benefits of the Proposal 
The existing port and rail system at Geraldton has limited capacity to accommodate the expanding 
iron‐ore industry in the Mid‐West region.  In addition, due to depth limitations, Geraldton port can 
only  partially  load  Panamax‐class  vessels.    Further  expansion  of  Geraldton  Port  is  inhibited  by  the 
Port’s location in the town of Geraldton.   
The proposed Oakajee Port and Rail Proposal will provide an iron ore transport, receiving, handling 
and exporting facility within the Mid‐West region. 
Oakajee was planned by the Government of WA to mitigate environmental and community impacts, 
including dust and noise emissions and heavy vehicle traffic, associated with bulk‐commodity exports 
in close proximity to a population centre. 
The  development  of  the  Proposal  will  result  in  financial  and  social  benefits  throughout  the  region 
through  increases  in  employment  opportunities,  infrastructure  development  in  more  suitable 
locations and a flow‐on effect to the non‐mining sectors.  Geraldton is currently benefiting from the 
re‐development  of  the  town  following  removal  of  rail  components  of  the  port  facilities  from  the 
town centre. 
Environmental Assessment  
The Proposal was referred to the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) in October 2009.  Based 
on the information in the referral document, it was determined that the likely environmental impacts 
associated  with  the  Proposal  are  sufficient  to  warrant  formal  assessment  under  the  Environmental 
Protection Act 1986 (EP Act).  In November 2009 the EPA advertised that the Proposal would be the 
subject of a PER level of assessment, including a four week public comment period.  No appeals were 
made to the level of assessment.   
The purpose of the PER is to assist the EPA in assessing the environmental impacts of the Proposal 
under  Section 40 of the  EP Act.   Preparation of this document has been undertaken in accordance 
with the Environmental Scoping Document (OPR, 2010) as agreed with the EPA and according to the 
Guidelines  for  Preparing  a  Public  Environmental  Review  /Environmental  Review  and  Management 
Plan (EPA, 2009b).   
OPR  has  commissioned  a  range  of  environmental  investigations  to  identify  key  risks  to  the 
environment  as  a  result  of  the  Proposal.    Environmental  surveys  to  date  have  included  vegetation 
and  flora,  fauna  (including  short  range  endemics  and  subterranean  invertebrate  fauna),  surface 
hydrology, groundwater, noise, Aboriginal heritage and social impacts. 
Environmental Factors  
Environmental factors relevant to the Proposal are considered to be: 
 
Vegetation and flora – the Proposal is expected to require approximately 7000 ha of ground 
disturbance,  including  approximately  6000  ha  of  native  vegetation.   Some  clearing  will  be 
required  in  the  freehold  area,  which  has  already  been  extensively  cleared.    Four  Priority 
Ecological  Communities,  three  Environment  Protection  and  Biodiversity  Conservation  Act 
1999 (EPBC Act) listed flora species (of which two are also listed as Declared Rare Flora (DRF)) 
and 87 Priority Flora species have been recorded within the Proposal Area; 
 
Fauna – habitat will be impacted by the Proposal. Five species listed under the EPBC Act have 
been recorded within the  Proposal Area, as have  two migratory  bird species.  An additional 
eight  listed  species  listed  under  the  Wildlife  Conservation  Act  (1950)  were  also  recorded 
within the Proposal Area; 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
vi 
 
 
Surface hydrology – the Proposal Area crosses a number of major and minor drainage lines, 
as well as sheetflow areas; 
 
Groundwater  –  the  Proposal  involves  the  construction  of  approximately  200  groundwater 
bores for use as construction, potable or maintenance water; 
 
Noise,  light  and  vibration  –  the  Proposal  will  generate  noise,  vibration  and  light  emissions, 
with noise emissions during operation being of most interest; 
 
Air quality – the Proposal will generate dust emissions during construction; 
 
Soil  quality  –  the  Proposal  Area  intersects  with  several  areas  of  potential  acid  sulfate  soil 
(ASS) risk; 
 
Wastes  and  hazardous  materials  –  the  Proposal  will  generate  construction,  industrial, 
hazardous,  domestic  and  other  wastes.    Hazardous  materials  will  be  stored  within  the 
Proposal Area, predominantly during construction; 
 
Greenhouse gases (GHG) – the Proposal will generate GHG emissions; 
 
Aboriginal  heritage  –  sites  are  known  to  exist  within  the  Proposal  Area  and  there  is  the 
potential for additional unknown sites to be discovered; 
 
Visual amenity – the Proposal will be visible from nearby vantage points; and 
 
Other social and economic factors – including nuisance issues, public risk and benefits. 
Stakeholder Consultation 
OPR  is  committed  to  ongoing  stakeholder  and  community  engagement  and  recognises  the 
importance  of  genuine  stakeholder  involvement  in  the  identification  of  potential  issues  and 
concerns, as well as appropriate management of impacts. 
Community and stakeholder consultations in relation to the Proposal were commenced in 2006 by 
Murchison Metals Ltd and continue to the present date with OPR. 
Key stakeholders identified early in the planning phase of the Proposal include: 
 
Local government authorities; 
 
State and Commonwealth government agencies; 
 
Local communities; 
 
Traditional owners; and 
 
Interested groups and organisations. 
Key themes from community and stakeholder consultations relating to environmental impacts have 
been: 
 
changes to surface hydrology; 
 
salinity; 
 
groundwater overuse; 
 
impacts on vegetation and flora; 
 
weeds; 
 
Aboriginal heritage;  
 
impacts on fauna; 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
vii 
 
 
visual amenity; 
 
impacts on land use; 
 
emissions – dust, noise, light, GHG; 
 
traffic impacts; and 
 
community engagement. 
The above issues raised by stakeholders have been addressed in this PER. 
OPR  will  continue  to  engage  with  the  stakeholders  identified  in  this  PER,  including  regulatory 
authorities, throughout the construction and operational phases of the Proposal, on a range of social 
and  environmental  issues.    OPR  is  currently  implementing  a  Community  Stakeholder  Engagement 
Plan  to  ensure  future  communication  and  consultation  with  key  stakeholders  through  a  range  of 
mechanisms. 
Environmental Management 
The  scope  of  the  environmental  impact  assessment  and  consideration  of  social  issues  has  been 
defined  following  consultation  with  key  stakeholders  and  agreed  with  the  EPA  through  the 
environmental scoping process. The scope of investigations has required a range of specialist studies, 
the results of which are included in this document.  The full reports of the key specialist studies are 
included as appendices to this PER. 
Table  ES‐2  identifies  the  relevant  environmental  factors,  EPA  objectives  and  summarises  the 
potential  impacts,  and  identifies  environmental  management  and  mitigation  measures  to  reduce 
impacts and the predicted outcome. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
Table ES‐2 
Environmental factors relevant to the assessment of the Proposal 
Environmental 
Factor 
EPA Objective 
Existing Environment 
Potential Impacts 
Environmental Management 
Predicted Outcome 
BIOPHYSICAL 
Vegetation and 
Flora 
Maintain the 
abundance, 
biodiversity, 
geographic distribution 
and productivity of 
flora at species and 
ecosystem levels 
through the avoidance 
of adverse impacts 
and improvement of 
knowledge. 
  Native vegetation subject to broad 
scale grazing with low levels of 
disturbance throughout the pastoral 
area in the eastern two thirds of the 
Study Area 
  Approximately 830 vascular flora 
species recorded within the Study 
Area. 
  Largely cleared land used for 
farming with small, detached 
remnants of native vegetation in the 
western third of the Study Area 
(freehold area). 
  62 Weed species recorded within the 
Study Area, including 3 Declared 
Weeds occurring largely in the 
freehold area 
  26 Beard vegetation associations 
recorded within Study Area. 
  72 Ecologia vegetation units 
recorded within Study Area. 
 No Threatened Ecological 
Communities (TECs) known from 
within the Study Area.   
  4 Priority Ecological Communities 
(PECs) known from within the Study 
Area. 
  3 EPBC Act listed flora species, 2 of 
which are Declared Rare Flora 
(DRF). 87 Priority Flora (PF) 
recorded within the Study Area. 
  Agricultural land use in the freehold 
area dominated by broad scale 
dryland farming with crops and 
pastures. 
 
  The most significant potential impact 
identified is the direct impact of clearing of 
native vegetation for construction of the Rail 
Corridor.  Most of the disturbance of native 
vegetation is in the pastoral area 5900 ha 
out of a total of 6000 ha). 
  Indirect impacts may also occur on 
vegetation within and immediately adjacent 
to the Rail Corridor and ancillary facilities 
from interference with local drainage 
patterns. 
  Spread of weeds, particularly from 
construction and maintenance activities 
  Indirect impacts through possible increases 
in the frequency of fire. 
  Increased risk of erosion and / or 
sedimentation impacting on vegetation. 
  Possible fragmentation of vegetation and 
flora populations, which may impact on 
population dynamics and increase edge 
effects 
 
  Clearing control system will be implemented to 
restrict the number and extent of cleared areas 
to the minimum needed for safe and efficient 
implementation of the Proposal.   
  Vegetation clearing will be minimised and will 
occur within clearly defined boundaries. 
  All conservation significant locations will be 
avoided where possible and will be marked 
with restricted access. 
  Throughout the freehold area native vegetation 
will not be cleared except for the purposes of 
the Rail Corridor itself and access tracks 
where alternative routes are not practicable. 
  Rail Corridor restricted to an average 100 m 
disturbance width through areas of native 
vegetation in the freehold area. 
  PECs will be avoided and a 50 m buffer will be 
put in place around these areas. 
  More detailed weed assessments completed 
along the corridor prior to significant ground 
disturbance and hygiene controls based on 
this information and consultation with 
landholders. 
  Restricted movement of topsoil and machinery 
or hygiene controls between sites where 
weeds could be spread to new locations during 
construction. 
  Workforce education to include weed 
awareness and control information. 
  Maintain Weed Hygiene Program such that 
weed inspection reports, records of weed 
hygiene certificates and weed survey data is 
recorded, assessed and reported.  The Weed 
Hygiene Program will be regularly reviewed. 
  Use incident reporting system to identify and 
rectify non-compliance with the Weed Hygiene 
Program, 
  Post-construction weed survey and weed 
control program to ensure that new weed 
infestations from construction activities are 
controlled. 
  Preparation and implementation of 
construction rehabilitation management plans 
in consultation with landholders. 
  Monitoring of vegetation health to ensure that 
Vegetation Clearing 
  Approximately 6000 ha of 
native vegetation.   
 
Up to 100 ha of 
vegetation clearing in 
the freehold area.  
 Sheetflow 
dependant 
Mulga will not be 
significantly impacted 
due to the installation of 
‘environmental’ culverts  
 Weeds 
controlled 
by 
survey, hygiene and 
control measures. 
 
Consideration of offset 
package for residual 
environmental impacts. 
Significant communities: 
  No impacts to TECs or 
PECs. 
  Reductions in vulnerable 
Beard and Burns (1976) 
mapped associations all 
less than 0.2% or pre-
European extent and not 
considered significant. 
 >92% 
of 
significant 
Ecologia vegetation units 
within the Study Area to 
remain undisturbed by 
the Proposal 
Significant Flora: 
  No impacts to DRF  
  Majority of Priority Flora 
species will not be 
significantly impacted by 
the Proposal.  11 species 
subject to further surveys 
pre-disturbance to allow 
Proposal to avoid where 
practicable resulting in no 
threat to the viability of 
Priority Flora species. 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
Environmental 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə