Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə30/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   ...   41

7.9.5 
Proposed Mitigation and Management Measures 
7.9.5.1 
Performance Management 
OPR has  developed environmental management objectives, targets and performance indicators for 
soil quality (Table 7‐28). 
Table 7‐28  Soil quality management objectives, targets and performance indicators 
Management Objective 
Target 
Performance Indicators 
Minimise disturbance to ASS. 
Avoid known PASS where practicable. 
Comply with ASSMP 
Soil Testing. 
Manage disturbed ASS to avoid adverse 
impacts on all aspects of the 
surrounding environment. 
No contamination of surface water or 
soils with acidity and/or heavy metals. 
Comply with ASSMP 
Soil testing. 
7.9.5.2 
Management Strategies 
OPR  has  commenced  consultation  with  affected  landholders  along  the  Proposal  Area.    As  the 
proposed  centreline  for  the  rail  is  finalised,  OPR  will  expand  these  consultations  to  consider  more 
detail  of  the  individual  paddocks,  drainage  and  farm  management  aspects,  farming  facilities  and 
activities  impacted  by  the  Proposal.    The  basis  of  OPR’s  consultation  will  be  broader  than  just 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
205
environmental  issues  and  will  include  consideration  of  the  means  to  manage,  avoid,  minimise  or 
offset impacts on: 
 
Biosecurity; 
 
crop production; 
 
livestock production; 
 
soil disturbance and productivity; 
 
wind and water erosion; 
 
people/machinery movement issues and access; 
 
dissection of paddocks; and 
 
impact on wider land values. 
Environmentally,  two  key  areas  of  mitigation  and  management  are  identified  for  soil  quality  and 
related agricultural productivity: 
 
detailed  construction  planning to  be integrated with individual farm plans and to address 
key agricultural environmental aspects such as: 

biosecurity; 

impacts on drainage; 

rehabilitation of borrow areas and haulage routes; and 

minimising  construction  impacts  to  seeding,  harvesting  and  day‐to‐day  farming 
operations. 
 
detailed investigation and management for the small areas of ASS. 
In  addition  to  these  management  areas,  industry  best  practice  in  hydrocarbon  and  hazardous 
materials management will be used to reduce the risk of contamination of soils to insignificant. 
Particular  attention  will  be  given  to  biosecurity  and  the  requirements  for  vehicle  hygiene.    OPR  is 
developing a generic weed management strategy for construction at a broader scale to manage the 
ecological risks of weed spread.   
Borrow  areas  will  be  identified  as  the  feasibility  investigations  proceed.    A  generic  Borrow  Area 
Rehabilitation Plan (BARP) will  be prepared for borrow areas to be retained within the  operational 
corridor.    Where  borrow  areas  will  be  returned  to  landholder  control,  detailed  individual  plans  for 
each borrow area will be prepared in consultation with each landholder to ensure that outcomes are 
acceptable  to  the  landowner.    A  small  number  of  borrow  areas  will  be  retained  for  ongoing 
maintenance works. 
Further ASS investigations will focus on the high risk areas and confirmation of likely behaviours.  An 
ASS  management  plan  will  be  developed  to  identify  risks,  appropriate  controls  and  responsibilities 
prior  to  construction  in  the  high  risk  areas.    The  plan  will  include  details  of  further  sampling  to 
comply with DEC guidelines. 
Table 7‐29 describes management actions to be implemented to ensure that soil quality is protected 
and the small areas of potential ASS are appropriately managed. 
 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
206
Table 7‐29  Proposed soil quality management strategies 
Management Strategies 
Relevant EMP  Phase 
Responsible 
Persons 
Design infrastructure to minimise disturbance of ASS 
ASS 
Management 
Plan (ASSMP) 
Design 
Environment Manager, 
Construction Manager 
Detailed individual rehabilitation plans for borrow areas and access 
tracks that will be returned to landholder control to be prepared in 
consultation with individual landholders prior to construction. 
BARP 
Prior to 
construction  
Regional Manager 
Consult with landholders to integrate farm plan aspects into 
construction management. 

Prior to 
construction 
Regional Manager 
When excavation in areas of potential ASS is required a detailed 
survey will be completed in accordance with DEC guidelines (DEC, 
2004). 
ASSMP 
Prior to 
construction 
Environment Manager 
Prepare and implement an ASSMP to manage construction 
activities in areas of known or suspected ASS. 
ASSMP 
Prior to 
construction 
Environment Manager, 
Construction Manager 
Management of hazardous materials to ensure that risks of 
contamination of soil is minimised as outlined in Section 7.10. 
Hazardous 
Materials & 
Contamination 
MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Safety Manager, 
Construction Manager, 
Operations Manager 
7.9.6 
Predicted Outcome 
Soil disturbance and rehabilitation will be managed in accordance with plans agreed with individual 
landholders.  Borrow areas will be rehabilitated (except for a small number that will be retained for 
maintenance) according to Borrow Area Rehabilitation Plans.  The purpose of these plans will be to 
return the land to productive use.   
No  significant  impacts  are  anticipated  arising  from  disturbance  of  ASS  as  only  1.3%  of  the  16%  of 
Proposal  Area  expected  to  have  moderate‐high  risk  of  ASS  requires  excavation.    With  the 
implementation of these plans, minor and small scale impacts on soil structure and productivity are 
expected.   
The  application  of  individual  landholder  consultation  and  management  controls  through  the  land 
access  negotiations  for  biosecurity,  drainage  management,  and  integration  with  farm  planning  is 
expected to result in impacts being acceptable. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
207
7.10 
WASTE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS 
7.10.1 
Overview 
Due  to  the  rural  land  use  there  are  no  hazardous  materials  stored  and  no  contaminated  sites 
registered within the Proposal Area.  Some minor dumping of waste is apparent from historical rural 
activities.    Nearby  waste  management  facilities  are  limited  to  Shire  landfills.    Some  hazardous 
materials may be transported along major roads such as the NWCH. 
7.10.2 
Key statutory requirements, environmental policy and guidance 
7.10.2.1  EPA Objectives 
The  EPA  objective  for  waste  management  is  to  ensure  that  project  wastes  do  not  adversely  affect 
environmental  values  or  the  health,  welfare  and  amenity  of  people  and  land  uses  by  meeting 
statutory requirements and acceptable standards.  
7.10.2.2  EPA statements and guidelines 
 
EPA Guidance No. 33 ‐ Environmental Guidance for Planning and Development (EPA, 2005). 
7.10.2.3  Applicable Legislation and Policy 
 
EP  Act  and  subsidiary  regulations  (e.g.  Environmental  Protection  (Controlled  Waste) 
Regulations 2004); 
 
Dangerous Goods Safety Act 2004 and subsidiary regulations; 
 
Dangerous Goods Safety (Road and Rail Transport of Non‐explosives) Regulations 2007; 
 
Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Act 2007; and 
 
Health Act 1911. 
Other applicable standards and guidelines include: 
 
Water Quality Protection Guidelines No. 10 ‐ Mining and Mineral Processing Above‐Ground 
Fuel and Chemical Storage (DoW, 2000); 
 
Australian  Standard  1940‐2004  ‐  The  storage  and  handling  of  flammable  and  combustible 
liquids; 
 
Guidance Note S301 ‐ Storage of Dangerous Goods Licensing and Exemptions (DoIR, 2004); 
 
Australian  Code  for  the  Transport  of  Dangerous  Goods  by  Road  and  Rail  (National  Road 
Transport Commission and ACTDG, 2005); 
 
Used Tyre Strategy for Western Australia, Waste Management Board, 2005; and 
 
Health Treatment of Sewage and Disposal of Effluent and Liquid Waste Regulations (DoH, 
1974). 
7.10.3 
Aspects and Impacts 
The  aspects  of  the  Proposal  with  the  potential  to  generate  waste  and  hazardous  materials  include 
construction activities, construction camps, and servicing of machinery and vehicles. 
Potential  impacts  associated  with  the  generation  of  wastes  and  hazardous  materials  are  generally 
associated  with  inappropriate  storage,  transport  or  disposal,  leading  to  environmental  pollution  or 
contamination.   

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
208
For example: 
 
burst hydraulic, fuel, oil or lubricant vehicle hoses; 
 
overflow of tanks due to overfilling; 
 
spills due to collisions or tipping; 
 
faulty or inadequate containers; 
 
faulty or inadequate secondary containment facilities; and 
 
poor vehicle maintenance. 
7.10.4 
Waste and Hazardous Materials Impact Assessment 
Construction and operation activities associated with the Proposal will generate waste materials and 
require  the  transport,  storage  and  handling  of  hydrocarbons  and  chemicals.  The  construction  and 
operation of the Proposal will generate the following types of wastes: 
 
general domestic and office refuse;  
 
biological wastes (e.g. sewage); 
 
hazardous wastes (e.g. oils, grease, lubricants);and 
 
industrial wastes (e.g. tyres, packaging, infrastructure and machinery components). 
The Proposal does not involve the storage or handling of large volumes of hazardous wastes.  Waste 
production  during  both  the  construction  and  operational  phases  will  be  no  different  to  similar 
construction  sites  and  operational  rail  facilities  located  elsewhere  in  WA.    Transport  of  hazardous 
materials along major traffic routes such as the North West Coastal Highway (NWCH) is not expected 
to be significant and the potential for vehicle/rail interaction has been eliminated by the selection of 
a grade separation bridges where the rail crosses the NWCH and the Chapman Valley Road. 
The  Proposal  will  require  up  to  six  waste  water  treatment  plants  (WWTPs)  to  accommodate  the 
sewage and waste water from the construction workforce estimated at a maximum of 3,000 people.  
Some of these facilities will be retained for the operational phase of the Proposal. 
Compliance  with  legislative  requirements  relating  to  waste  management  will  ensure  that  no 
significant  adverse  impacts  are  experienced  as  a  result  of  waste  produced  by  the  Proposal.    The 
relatively small volumes of controlled and hazardous wastes (mainly hydrocarbons) will be managed 
and  transported  in  accordance  with  the  Dangerous  Goods  Safety  Act  2004  and  the  Environmental 
Protection (Controlled Wastes) Regulation 2004. 
OPR will ensure that its management of waste complies with legislative requirements.  OPR will also 
seek to reduce and minimise its waste production via the implementation of a Waste Management 
Plan that will be  based on the hierarchy of waste  Minimisation.   On  this basis it is considered that 
significant impacts on the environment from waste production will be avoided. 
7.10.5 
Proposed Mitigation and Management Measures 
7.10.5.1 
Performance Management 
OPR has developed environmental management objectives, targets and performance indicators for 
waste (Table 7‐30). 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
209
Table 7‐30  Waste and hazardous material management objectives, targets and performance 
indicators   
OPR Management Objective 
Target 
Performance Indicators 
Prevent waste or hazardous material 
discharges/contamination to the 
surrounding environment. 
No waste or hazardous material 
discharges to the surrounding 
environment 
Compliance with Dangerous Goods and 
Controlled Waste Licenses 
Incident reporting 
7.10.5.2 
Management Strategies 
WWTPs  will  be  constructed  at  each  of  the  construction  camps.  Treated  wastewater  will  be 
discharged at designated spray irrigation areas to be established near the camps, or the wastewater 
will  be  treated  to  a  standard  that  is  suitable  for  use  for  dust  suppression  (subject  to  DoH 
requirements).  These facilities will be subject to licensing under Part V of the EP Act.  Wastewater 
disposal  will  be  spread  over  a  large  area  (in  accordance  with  WQPN  –  Irrigation  with  nutrient‐rich 
wastewater) to ensure that nutrient loading will not significantly impact the receiving environment. 
OPR will ensure putrescible waste is collected and stored appropriately in accordance with a Waste 
Management Plan.  It is anticipated that there will be a requirement for a small number of Class II 
landfill sites along the Proposal Area for the disposal of putrescible waste.  These are expected to be 
located  relatively  close  to  accommodation  facilities,  and  may  be  subject  to  DEC  licensing 
requirements depending on their size.  Shire landfills may also be used where practicable. 
If Class II landfill sites are constructed and utilised these will be in accordance with DEC requirements 
and a Part V Works Approval and Licence will be obtained.  DEC will be consulted regarding suitable 
locations and proposed designs.   
Hazardous  wastes  (such  as  used  hydrocarbons,  chemicals,  explosives,  batteries  etc)  will  be  stored 
and  transported  in  accordance  with  Dangerous  Goods  and  Controlled  Waste  legislation  to  ensure 
that there is no discharge to the environment. 
Storage, transport and use of hazardous materials will be in accordance with Dangerous Goods 
legislation and Australian standards.  Significant impacts from the use of hazardous materials during 
construction and operation of the Proposal are unlikely. 
Risk management processes will be applied to hazardous materials and wastes.  Hydrocarbon spills 
will  be  reported  as  incidents  and  responded  to  immediately.    Spill  kits  will  be  kept  in  designated 
positions  to  allow  the  swift  response  to  these  events.    Any  contaminated  soil  or  used  clean  up 
equipment will be taken to a licensed facility.   
The management measures summarised in Table 7‐31 are proposed to ensure that waste and 
hazardous materials are stored, handled and disposed of in a suitable manner to ensure that impacts 
are minimised. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
210
Table 7‐31  Proposed waste and hazardous material management strategies 
Management Strategies 
Relevant EMP 
Phase 
Responsible 
Persons 
Hazardous material handling, storage and spill response will occur in 
accordance with Dangerous Goods Licences issued under the Dangerous 
Goods Safety Act 2004 and Australian Standards.  
Hazardous 
Materials & 
Contamination 
MP 
Design, 
Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager, 
Safety Manager 
Prepare and implement a Hazardous Materials and Contamination Management 
Plan to document in detail how chemicals, hydrocarbons and hazardous goods 
or waste will be managed. Control measures will include: 
  storage compliant with AS 1940 and located away from watercourses; 
  Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) will be available for all chemicals 
used on site; 
  handling, use and storage of chemicals will be compliant with the 
relevant MSDS; 
  adequate fire control and spill response equipment will be available 
within work areas; 
  any hazardous materials required on site will be approved for use by the 
responsible manager prior to being transported to site; 
  all licences required for storage or handling of hazardous materials will 
be obtained, held on site and made available to all personnel; 
  hazardous waste will be removed from site by a licensed contractor for 
disposal in an approved facility in accordance with controlled waste 
regulations; 
  contractors handling or using hazardous materials will be required to be 
trained, to comply with applicable legislation and carry appropriate spill 
containment equipment; 
  used hazardous material containers will be labelled and stored 
appropriately for future use or disposal; 
  any fuel, oily waste storage, diesel generators and re-fuelling facilities will 
be constructed and regularly inspected to ensure compliance with all 
regulatory requirements; 
  a well drained wash down pad will be utilized for vehicles and equipment. 
An oil water separation system will be utilised to maintain water quality of 
any water emissions; and 
  remediate any contaminated sites in accordance with legal requirements. 
Hazardous 
Materials & 
Contamination 
MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Safety 
Manager, 
Construction 
Manager, 
Operations 
Manager 
Prepare and implement a Waste Management Plan based on the hierarchy of 
waste minimisation: 
   1. Waste avoidance/reduction. 
   2. Reuse, recycling and reclamation. 
   3. Waste treatment. 
   4. Waste disposal.   
The plan will include the following actions: 
  prior to construction and prior to operation Proposal waste audits will be 
conducted to: 
    - identify Proposal waste streams; 
    - quantify and characterise the waste types; 
    - establish how each waste stream is generated; and 
    - identify options to minimise each of the waste streams; 
  ensure that litter is minimised, and waste disposal, storage or transport 
occurs in accordance with relevant waste legislation and guidelines; 
  appropriate containers (vermin-proof) will be provided for putrescible waste 
and these wastes will be disposed of at a licensed facility; 
  appropriate facilities will be provided for waste materials, with separate 
areas for recyclable materials.  Facilities will be secure and clearly labelled 
for the various waste streams; 
  concrete wastes and concrete wash out will be contained in lined bunds; 
and 
  conduct a waste management audit every three years. 
Waste MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager, 
Construction 
Manager, 
Operations 
Manager 
7.10.6 
Predicted Outcome 
The waste or hazardous material issues to be managed by the Proposal are similar to those faced and 
managed  by  many  other  remote  operations  in  WA.    The  application  of  industry  standard 
preventative controls such as risk assessment and the application of storage and handling standards, 
incident  reporting  and  remedial  capacity  are  expected  to  significantly  reduce  risks  to  the 
environment.    There  are  adequate  legislative  controls  in  place  to  ensure  that  these  materials  are 
managed to avoid impacts to the environment.  

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
211
7.11 
GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS 
7.11.1 
Overview 
The  Greenhouse  Effect  is  a  natural  phenomenon  caused  by  atmospheric  (primarily  carbon  based) 
gases where heat radiating from the earth’s surface is trapped within the atmosphere.  Greenhouse 
gases (GHG) include carbon dioxide (CO
2
), water vapour, methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide 
and non‐methane volatile organic compounds. CO
2
 is the main anthropogenic GHG emission which 
has increased in concentration in the atmosphere by approximately 31% in the last 200 years (EPA, 
2002b).    Activities  such  as  farming,  fuel  usage  in  industry  and  vehicles,  vegetation  clearing  and 
explosives generate CO
2
.  
Transport  contributes  14.4%  of  Australia’s  total  GHG  emissions  and  is  one  of  the  fastest  growing 
sectors.  GHG emissions from total transport are proposed to increase by nearly 30% between 2005 
and 2020. 
Currently  the  majority  of  ore  mined  in  the  Mid‐West  is  trucked  from  mine  sites  to  the  Geraldton 
port.  Energy
 
efficiency  is  directly  related  to  CO
2
  emissions  and  rail  is  significantly  more  energy 
efficient  than  other  land‐based  transport  modes.    Rail  transport  requires  between  3  ‐  5  times  less 
energy per tonne carried than road (Railfuture 2004
).
 
The  National  Greenhouse  and  Energy  Reporting  Act  2007  (NGER  Act)  establishes  a  national  system 
for  reporting  these  GHG  emissions,  energy  consumption  and  abatement  actions.    From  July  2008, 
corporations are required to register and report if they emit greenhouse gases or consume energy at 
or above specified quantities in a financial year. 
At present the Proposal Area is used for rural activities, and contains no industries that are required 
to report under the NGER Act and GHG emissions from the Mid‐West are currently considered to be 
minor. 
1   ...   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə