Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə31/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   ...   41

7.11.2 
Key statutory requirements, environmental policy and guidance 
7.11.2.1  EPA Objectives 
The EPA objective for management of GHGs is to minimise emissions to levels as low as practicable 
on an ongoing basis and consider offsets to further reduce cumulative emissions. 
7.11.2.2  EPA statements and guidelines 
 
EPA Position Statement No. 6 ‐ Towards Sustainability (EPA, 2004); 
 
Guidance Statement No. 12 ‐ Guidance Statement for Minimising Greenhouse Gas Emissions 
(EPA, 2002); 
 
Guidance  Statement  No.  18  ‐  Prevention  of  Air  Quality  Impacts  from  Land  Development 
Sites (EPA, 2000); and 
 
Guidance Statement No. 33 ‐ Environmental Guidance for Planning and Development (EPA, 
2005). 
7.11.2.3  Applicable Legislation and Policy 
 
EP Act; and 
 
NGER Act. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
212
Other applicable standards and guidelines include: 
 
Australian  Methodology  for  the  Estimation  of  Greenhouse  Gas  Emissions  and  Sinks  2002 
Series (DEH, 2006); and 
 
National Environmental Protection Measure for Ambient Air Quality (NEPM, 1998). 
Federal legislation/policies 
The National Greenhouse Strategy (NGS) was released by the Australian Greenhouse Office (AGO) in 
1998,  and  was  prepared  by  the  Commonwealth  Government,  State  and  Territory  Governments.    It 
sets  out  to  provide  the  strategic  framework  for  effective  greenhouse  response  and  for  meeting 
current and future international commitments (AGO 1998).  The NGS commits Australia to actively 
contribute to the global effort to stabilise greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere.   
The  Greenhouse  Challenge  Program  was  established  by  the  Federal  Government  in  1995,  and  is  a 
voluntary  program  between  government  and  industry  to  abate  greenhouse  emissions.    In  2004, 
following  a  review  of  the  Greenhouse  Challenge  Program,  the  Federal  Government  launched  the 
Greenhouse Challenge Plus program.  This program builds on the success of the original program and 
incorporates  two  industry  focussed  measures  (Generator  Efficiency  Standards  and  Greenhouse 
Friendly  initiative),  and  changes  in  the  Federal  Government’s  energy  policy  ‘Securing  Australia’s 
Energy Future’.   
In 2004 the Federal Government released its new energy policy ‘Securing Australia’s Energy Future’.  
This  policy  recognised  the  importance  of  effective  management  of  greenhouse  gases  by  major 
energy  users  and  indicated  that  the  Greenhouse  Challenge  is  to  become  a  ‘single  entry  point’  for 
business reporting on greenhouse and energy.  
The Kyoto Protocol is an international treaty designed to limit global greenhouse gas emissions.  The 
agreement  was  reached  in  1997  in  Kyoto,  Japan,  and  establishes  individual  quantified  emissions 
limitations or reduction commitments (emissions targets) for each developed country based on 1990 
emissions, for the commitment period of 2008 to 2012.  The Federal Government has committed to 
meeting  the  target  agreed  at  Kyoto  of  limiting  GHG  emissions  to  108%  of  1990  levels  for  the 
commitment period.  
The NGER Act establishes a single, national system for reporting GHG emissions, abatement actions, 
and energy consumption and production by corporations.  The NGER Act also 
lays the foundation 
for  the  Australian  Emissions  Trading  System.   
As  from  1  July  2008  it  will  be  mandatory  for 
corporations  emitting  above  125,000 tonnes  carbon  dioxide  equivalents  per  annum  (t  CO
2
‐e  per 
annum), or 25,000 t CO
2
‐e per annum for a facility, to register and report annually under the NGER 
Act. 
State legislation/policies 
Carbon rights legislation was passed by the Western Australian Parliament in 2003.  The purpose of 
the Bill is to provide for the registration on land titles and a ‘carbon right’ and accompanying ‘carbon 
covenant’.  The Bill will give certainty to those wanting to trade in carbon rights and gain the credits 
or emission offsets which arise from sequestration. 
The WA Greenhouse Strategy was released in 2004 and sets out the State government’s response to 
climate  change.    The  State  recognises  the  weaknesses  and  limitations  of  the  Kyoto  Protocol,  but 
believes  the  Protocol  represents  an  essential  step  towards  dealing  with  climate  change.    Key 
components  of  the  Strategy  include  government  leadership,  reducing  emissions,  local  government 
and community involvement, and national and international representation. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
213
7.11.3 
Aspects and Impacts 
The most significant emissions will be direct emissions (Scope 1 emissions) from the Proposal.  Direct 
emissions are expected to be produced as a result of fuel combustion and power generation.  These 
emissions  will  contribute  to  atmospheric  pollution  as  they  are  expected  to  contain  CO
2
,  carbon 
monoxide, nitrogen oxides and benzene.  The clearing and subsequent decomposition of vegetation 
will also contribute to emissions. 
Indirect emissions (Scope 2 emissions) may result from the consumption of purchased electricity that 
may  be  used  for  the  operation  of  the  sleeper  plant  for  the  period  of  construction.    These  will  be 
temporary and minor. 
Other  emissions  are  also  expected  from  the  following  sources,  but  are  not  considered  to  produce 
significant  volumes  or  have  a  major  impact  and  include  emissions  from  refrigerant  gases,  on‐site 
landfill facilities and wastewater treatment. 
GHG Impact Assessment 
Estimated fuel consumption for the construction phase of the Proposal is approximately 48,000 kL of 
diesel.    This  fuel  usage  is  associated  with  powering  earthwork  equipment,  vehicles,  construction 
camps and bore pumps.  
Fuel  usage  associated  with  the  maintenance  camp  and  maintenance  activities  is  estimated  at 
approximately 4,000 kL per year. Fuel usage as a result of locomotives and train movements is still to 
be finalised, however, it has been estimated at approximately 45,000 kL/yr. An initial estimation of 
GHG emissions suggests approximately 250,000 t of CO
2‐e
 during the 36 month construction phase, 
and approximately 130,000 t of CO
2‐e
/yr during the operational phase (Table 7‐32).  This represents 
approximately 0.02 % of Australia’s annual GHG emissions as at 2009. 
Table 7‐32  Estimated GHG emissions from diesel fuel usage 
Proposal Component 
Fuel Type kL 
Energy Content Factor 
GJ/kL 
Emission factor kg 
CO
2-e
/GJ 
Tonnes of CO
2-e
 
Construction – fuel use 
48,000 
38.6 
69.2 
128,213 
Construction – clearing 
See Note 
122,080 
Operation – fuel use
 
(maintenance activities)  
4,000/yr 38.6 
69.2 
10,684 
Operation – trains 
45,000/yr 
38.6 
69.2 
120,200 
Note: 
Australian Department of Climate Change’s National Greenhouse Accounts Factors (2009) 
6000 hectares native vegetation clearing. Based on Figure 2 of CRC for Greenhouse Accounting report to the WA Greenhouse Taskforce 
(2003), with route divided as follows: 
 
3/5 of the rail route (4200 ha) @ 2.4 tonnes CO
2
/ha (Treagust, 2008) = 10080 
 
1/5 of the rail route (1400 ha) @ 15 tonnes CO
2
/ha (CRC for GH Accounting, 2003) = 21000 
 
1/5 of the rail route (1400 ha) @ 65 tonnes CO
2
/ha (CRC for GH Accounting, 2003) = 91000 
Assuming 1L diesel / tonne @ 45Mtpa 
7.11.4 
Proposed Mitigation and Management Measures 
7.11.4.1 
Performance Management 
OPR has  developed environmental management objectives, targets and performance indicators for 
GHG emissions (Table 7‐33). 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
214
Table 7‐33  GHG emissions management objectives, targets and performance indicators 
OPR Management Objective 
Target 
Performance Indicators 
Minimise CO
2
 (GHG) emissions during 
construction. 
Adopting of appropriate and clean 
technologies. 
Monitor emission rates. 
Compliance with any future 
Commonwealth GHG legislation 
Meet and continually strive to lower CO
2
 (GHG) 
emissions targets during operation. 
OPR CO
2
 (GHG) emissions targets (to 
be determined). 
Monitor emissions rates 
7.11.4.2 
Management Strategies 
Table 7‐34 details OPR’s proposed management strategies for GHG’s. 
Table 7‐34  Proposed GHG management strategies 
Management Strategies 
Relevant 
EMP 
Phase 
Responsible 
Persons 
Energy use monitoring will be undertaken monthly and results reported 
to OPR Management. 
GHG MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
OPR will identify and comply with all energy usage and GHG reporting 
requirements, and any future Commonwealth GHG legislation. 
GHG MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
Construction and operations will be conducted with efficiency of energy 
use as a guiding principal to reduce unnecessary GHG emissions 
GHG MP 
Design, 
Construction 
and 
Operation 
Project Engineer
Operations 
Manager, 
Environment 
Manager 
Consider fuel efficiency and emissions profiles for all new locomotive 
purchases. 
GHG MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Operations 
Manager 
Report GHG emissions in accordance with NGERS 
GHG MP 
Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
Participate in the Commonwealth Carbon Pollution reduction Scheme as 
required 
GHG MP 
Operation 
Environment 
Manager 
Benchmark greenhouse emissions targets for each major phase of the 
Proposal against best practice. 
GHG MP 
Operation 
Operations 
Manager, 
Environment 
Manager 
Conduct annual energy audits of operations 
GHG MP 
Operation 
Operations 
Manager, 
Environment 
Manager 
Implement energy saving strategies for the rail system addressing factors 
such as fuel type, equipment design, rail design, operational procedures, 
schedules, loading and unloading systems, and technology. 
GHG MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Operations 
Manager 
In addition to the management strategies above OPR has also committed to using Tier 1 locomotives 
(refer to Section 4.4.1) which use 15% less fuel and utilise a cleaner burning process. 
7.11.1 
Predicted Outcome 
The Proposal will generate carbon‐based emissions representing approximately 0.02% of Australia’s 
GHG emissions (based on 2008 data).  Emissions at this level will require reporting under the NGER 
Act.  The Proposal will result in more efficient use of fuel as ore rail transport has a lower emissions 
rate (when comparing tonnes of ore/L of diesel) in comparison to emissions associated with existing 
road  based  ore  transport  in  the  region.        Additionally,  OPR’s  locomotives  will  be  a  higher  rating 
standard than those required by Australian regulation, resulting in a greater fuel efficiency and lower 
GHG emissions. 
OPR  is  committed  to  reducing  its  greenhouse  footprint  as  much  as  practicable  and  will  implement 
strategies that aim to reduce the proposed emissions. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
215
7.12 
HERITAGE 
7.12.1 
Overview 
The Proposal is within the external boundaries of the Naaguja, Amangu, Widi Mob, Mullewa Wadjari 
and Wajarri Yamatji native title claims. 
OPR has consulted with the above Native Title claim groups and their representatives regarding the 
potential impacts of the Project since late 2008.  Over that time a detailed heritage protocol has been 
agreed  between  the  parties  that  sets  out  the  heritage  management  requirements  in  detail.    These 
agreements  formed  the  cornerstone  of  OPR’s  Aboriginal  Cultural  Heritage  Management  Plan 
(ACHMP) that guide the implementation of Indigenous heritage management for the Project. 
Aboriginal  sites  within  the  Project  area  that  have  been  registered  with  DIA  under  the  AH  Act  are 
shown  in  Figure  5‐38.    These  include  Weld  Range  and  Jack  Hills,  which  are  known  to  have 
mythological associations to local Aboriginal people.  Water courses, lakes, and prominent landscape 
features may all have ethnographic significance to Indigenous people.  These same features are often 
found  to  have  a  higher  density  of  archaeological  material  such  as  artefact  scatters,  middens.    It  is 
likely that unregistered sites of Aboriginal heritage also exist within the Proposal Area as some areas 
have had little survey work completed on them. 
Indigenous Heritage survey work has commenced on key areas of the Proposal Area. 
7.12.2 
Key statutory requirements, environmental policy and guidance 
7.12.2.1  EPA Objectives 
The  EPA  objective  for  the  management  of  heritage  is  to  ensure  that  changes  to  the  biophysical 
environment  do  not  adversely  affect  historical  and  cultural  associations  and  comply  with  relevant 
heritage legislation.  
7.12.2.2  EPA statements and guidelines 
 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 41 ‐ Assessment of Aboriginal Heritage (EPA, 2004); and 
 
EPA Guidance No. 33 ‐ Environmental Guidance for Planning and Development (EPA, 2005). 
EPA Guidance Statement No. 41 (EPA 2004b) provides guidance on the process for the assessment of 
Aboriginal heritage as an  environmental factor.  This guidance statement also details those actions 
that  may  be  pertinent  to  the  factor  of  Aboriginal  heritage,  including  undertaking  surveys  and 
consulting local Aboriginal people. 
7.12.2.3  Applicable Legislation and Policy 
 
Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972 (AH Act) (WA); 
 
EP Act (WA); 
 
Native Title Act 1993 (Commonwealth); and 
 
Heritage of Western Australia Act 1990. 
Aboriginal Heritage 
The Minister for Indigenous Affairs is responsible for the administration of the AH Act. The Minister’s 
responsibility  is  to  ensure  that  all  places  that  are  considered  to  be  sacred  or  of  ceremonial 
significance  to  Aboriginal  people  are  recorded  and  their  importance  evaluated  on  behalf  of  the 
community. It is an offence to disturb any Aboriginal site without consent from the Minister under 
section  18  of  the  AH  Act.  The  Minister  considers  recommendations  from  the  Aboriginal  Cultural 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
216
Material  Committee  and  the  general  interests  of  the  community  when  making  a  decision  on 
disturbance to a site, and may also impose conditions on the approval. 
The  Registrar  of  Aboriginal  Sites  is  responsible  for  maintaining  the  Register  of  Places  and  Objects.  
The Department of Indigenous Affairs (DIA) has a database of all recorded sites.  DIA also provides 
advice  for  developers  in  Aboriginal  Heritage  and  Development  in  Western  Australia  –  Advice  for 
Developers (DIA, 1999). 
Non‐indigenous heritage 
The  Heritage  Council  of  WA  operates  under  the  Heritage  of  Western  Australia  Act  1990  (Heritage 
Act).  The Heritage Council of WA maintains the State Register, which provides official recognition of 
a place’s cultural heritage significance to WA.  Protection is achieved through the requirement under 
the  Heritage  Act  that  all  development  proposals  regarding  a  registered  place  be  referred  to  the 
Heritage Council for advice. 
The Australian Heritage Council is the principal adviser to the Australian Government on Australian 
heritage  matters.    The  Council  assesses  nominations  for  the  National  Heritage  List  and  the 
Commonwealth Heritage List and compiles the Register of the National Estate. 
The  Australian  Heritage  Database  is  maintained  by  the  Council  and  contains  a  listing  of  natural, 
historic  and  Indigenous  places  listed  in  the  World  Heritage  List,  National  Heritage  List, 
Commonwealth Heritage List and the Register of the National Estate. 
7.12.3 
Aspects and Impacts 
No known sites of non‐indigenous Heritage significance are to be impacted by the Proposal. 
Aspects of the Proposal with the potential to impact Aboriginal Heritage include: 
 
clearing; 
 
earth moving; 
 
increased number of people in the area; 
 
vehicle movements; 
 
infrastructure; and 
 
train movements. 
Potential impacts to Aboriginal heritage sites relate primarily to direct disturbance and include: 
 
disturbance of sites during the construction of Proposal infrastructure; 
 
landscape  level  changes  through  the  development  of  a  visible  linear  feature  through  the 
landscape; 
 
accidental damage of artefacts by off‐road vehicle use; and 
 
indirect disturbance to sites from changes in water flows, spillages, dust, or other indirect 
impacts. 
7.12.4 
Heritage Impact Assessment 
The existing level of heritage survey shows that there are a number of sites likely to be impacted by 
the  Proposal.    More  detailed  survey  work  will  add  to  this  body  of  knowledge  and  provide  a  more 
complete picture of heritage prior to project implementation.  Whilst there is some flexibility in the 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
217
location  of  the  rail,  there  are  also  a  number  of  practical  and  environmental  constraints  to  be 
considered. 
The  patterning  and  historic  use  of  the  area  by  Indigenous  people  means  that  sites  of  Aboriginal 
heritage associated with watercourses within the Proposal Area are the most likely to be impacted.  
This will be mitigated to some extent by the avoidance of watercourses for borrow and construction 
materials  where  practicable.    River  crossings  are  the  first  areas  being  intensively  surveyed  by  OPR.  
Some flexibility has been retained in the environmental and other statutory aspects of the Proposal 
to enable detailed design to avoid sites wherever practicable.  Where it is not practicable to do so, 
OPR  will  consult  with  the  native  title  claim  groups  in  relation  to  the  mitigation  and  salvage  of  any 
affected  Aboriginal  sites  and  seek  the  consent  of  the  Minister  for  Indigenous  Affairs  pursuant  to 
Section 18 of the AH Act. 
OPR has agreed processes in place with each of the Native Title claim groups affected by the Proposal 
to facilitate the identification of unregistered Aboriginal sites and Aboriginal heritage surveys will be 
progressively  conducted  over  the  Proposal  Area  prior  to  commencement  of  construction.    Impacts 
can be effectively minimised by using these processes. 
7.12.5 
Proposed Mitigation and Management Measures 
7.12.5.1 
Performance Management 
OPR has  developed environmental management objectives, targets and performance indicators for 
heritage (Table 7‐35). 
Table 7‐35  Heritage management objectives, targets and performance indicators 
OPR Management Objective 
Target 
Performance Indicators 
Ensure that OPR complies with the 
requirements of the AH Act  and 
Native Title Act 1993. 
Prevent disturbance to 
Aboriginal heritage sites unless 
consent has been granted under 
section 18 of the AH Act. 
Consultation with the relevant Aboriginal native title 
claimant groups.  
No Aboriginal sites of significance adversely 
affected without consent being granted under 
section 18 of the AH Act. 
Utilisation and referral to the OPR Aboriginal 
Cultural Heritage Management Plan. This plan shall 
also be in force during operations at all times. 
OPR will continue consulting with 
the relevant Aboriginal groups 
during the design of the Proposal 
and with respect to any future 
changes to the Proposal Area. 
Ensure that the relevant 
Aboriginal groups/people are 
consulted at each stage of the 
development. 
Heritage survey coverage.  
Compliance with the  AH Act  and any consent and 
conditions granted under Section 18. 
Ensure that all OPR personnel and 
contractors are aware of their 
responsibilities under AH Act 
All staff and contractors have 
undertaken Cultural Awareness 
Program 
Cultural awareness training, appropriate inductions 
and accurate training records.  
7.12.5.2 
Management Strategies 
In  order  to  avoid,  minimise  and  mitigate  the  impacts  discussed  in  Section  7.12.4,  management 
strategies outlined in Table 7‐36 are proposed. 
OPR will avoid Aboriginal sites wherever reasonably possible.  Where it is not possible to do so, OPR 
will consult with the native title claim groups in relation to the mitigation and salvage of any affected 
Aboriginal sites and seek the consent of the Minister for Indigenous Affairs pursuant to Section 18 of 
the AH Act. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
218
OPR has agreed processes in place with each of the native title claim groups affected by the Proposal 
to facilitate the identification of unregistered Aboriginal sites and Aboriginal heritage surveys will be 
progressively conducted over the Proposal Area prior to commencement of construction. 
1   ...   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə